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First wedding cake...Help!!

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I bake/decorate just for fun but word has been getting out so I've been getting several orders. A friend of my husbands wants me to make their wedding cake. I live on an island in Alaska without access to most decorating/baking supplies and the date is August 11th so I don't have a whole lot of time to order. So they want a two tier cake that will serve 80 people. I have three 10x2 pans, two 9x2 and one 6x3 all round pans. What sizes should a make to serve 80 but also look right? I really don't want to have to purchase pans. Also my idea is to get a realistic bear mold and have a fly fishing bear pulling up the female bear and have a waterfall bordered with rocks coming down the side of the cakes. Can I use blue piping gel for the water on top of fondant or should I use gel colors with clear alcohol to paint it on? Thank you do much for your help! I come here often, I just dont post too often.
post #2 of 15
http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

Two 2" layers of each of your pan sizes will yield 82 servings, however I don't think a 9" looks so great on top of a 10". If you'd consider buying a 12" pan to use with the 9" and 6", the bottom tiers would serve 88 and the couple could freeze the 6" top tier for their 1st wedding anniversary.
post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thank you! I will purchase a 12" pan and make a three tier.
post #4 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by AKmomto4

Thank you! I will purchase a 12" pan and make a three tier.



Oh, I guess I didn't catch that part, that they wanted a two-tier cake... I was busy looking at the pan sizes that you owned. If they really want a two tier (aren't freezing the top, and you're buying a 12" pan anyway), you could make a 12" and 8" for exactly 80 servings.
(Yes, 6" top tiers are typical, but an 8" top tier won't look huge on a 12" especially if it's covered with a proportionate topper or flowers.)
post #5 of 15
Don't forget the dowels.
post #6 of 15
Yes, if you've never made a tiered cake before, you'll need to use a support system for every 4" of cake height.

This might come in handy:
http://www.wilton.com/cakes/tiered-cakes/
post #7 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thank you so much for your help! I have made two and one three tiered cakes do yes I will definitely be doweling. Not sure how to transfer the cake though. My husband said they are getting married at a place that is about a 30 minute drive on kind of a bumpy road. The cake will be three tiers with a waterfall going down the cake and a bunch of woodsy/animal accents. I have heard to take the tiers apart to travel but not sure how I could do that without messing up the waterfall and accents. Wish I could get one of those wedding cake boxes shipped to me but nobody likes to ship to AK without charging an astronomical amount. icon_sad.gif
post #8 of 15
If it's a buttercream cake make sure your cake is ice cold and hard...it travels better. You don't need to order a wedding cake box. Find a box...any box...if you have Walmart they sell sturdy boxes...find one that fits the base of your cake board. That is if you have the cake on a 12" square cake board, find a 12" square box. If it's round, sometimes you have to go up an inch in the box size but just make sure you have some mesh rubber shelf liner on the bottom to keep the cake from sliding around in the box. Tape up all the flaps so it's pretty tall. Split two sides of the box so it opens down and you can slide the cake in. Tape it all up and put it on a FLAT surface in your car with some rubber mesh shelf liner underneath it so it will not slide.

Many people don't put their tiered cakes in boxes but I do just in case a sudden stop occurs and loose things that can go flying in the car won't hit the cake...plus the cake will be contained in a tight space so if it (God forbid) collapses, it will be in the box and not all over your car...(and easier to fix).

If there are any attachments to your cake that can be applied at the location, put those in a separate box or tray (again on mesh liner) and do it at the site. Make extras in case something breaks.

Put a sign in your rear view mirror that says 'wedding cake on board' so everyone will know why you are driving slowly and carefully. Next...drive slowly and carefully. Have the air conditioner blasting to keep the cake cold.

Make sure to have a repair kit on board to fix any mishaps that may occur.
30 minutes may turn into 45 minutes or longer so make sure your delivery time is adjusted.
It should be fine. As long as you're prepared, you'll be able to take care of any problems in plenty of time. Good luck!

If I am ever on life support, unplug me...

Then plug me back in.  See if that works!

Reply

If I am ever on life support, unplug me...

Then plug me back in.  See if that works!

Reply
post #9 of 15
If it's a buttercream cake make sure your cake is ice cold and hard...it travels better. You don't need to order a wedding cake box. Find a box...any box...if you have Walmart they sell sturdy boxes...find one that fits the base of your cake board. That is if you have the cake on a 12" square cake board, find a 12" square box. If it's round, sometimes you have to go up an inch in the box size but just make sure you have some mesh rubber shelf liner on the bottom to keep the cake from sliding around in the box. Tape up all the flaps so it's pretty tall. Split two sides of the box so it opens down and you can slide the cake in. Tape it all up and put it on a FLAT surface in your car with some rubber mesh shelf liner underneath it so it will not slide.

Many people don't put their tiered cakes in boxes but I do just in case a sudden stop occurs and loose things that can go flying in the car won't hit the cake...plus the cake will be contained in a tight space so if it (God forbid) collapses, it will be in the box and not all over your car...(and easier to fix).

If there are any attachments to your cake that can be applied at the location, put those in a separate box or tray (again on mesh liner) and do it at the site. Make extras in case something breaks.

Put a sign in your rear view mirror that says 'wedding cake on board' so everyone will know why you are driving slowly and carefully. Next...drive slowly and carefully. Have the air conditioner blasting to keep the cake cold.

Make sure to have a repair kit on board to fix any mishaps that may occur.
30 minutes may turn into 45 minutes or longer so make sure your delivery time is adjusted.
It should be fine. As long as you're prepared, you'll be able to take care of any problems in plenty of time. Good luck!

If I am ever on life support, unplug me...

Then plug me back in.  See if that works!

Reply

If I am ever on life support, unplug me...

Then plug me back in.  See if that works!

Reply
post #10 of 15
You can transport the cake easily in a corrugated box. I buy them from Walmart (about 1.00 for a 16 inch box). If the base of your cake is 12 inches and it sits on a 14 inch cake board, get a 14 inch x14 inch box. cut one side so that it drops down then you can slide the cake in then left the side you dropped back up and tape it back.

I have traveled up to 3 hours with a cake like that and it works for me.
post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 
No Walmart or any chain stores but I'm sure I could find a box somewhere. Awesome tips thanks!
post #12 of 15
I've seen more and more cakes on here where they have doubled the height of a particular sized pan for instance 3 layers of the 9x2 over a double 12x2 with a double 6" might give an interesting effect and take away from the difference in size. You can use the space on the 12" for lots of decorating and scenery especially with the ideals you have come up with that could easily become a "river" around the cake with room for a fisherman/woman

LOVE the wildlife, fishing idea!

I know the Ben Franklin & other big stores in Anchorage carry a lot of items but getting it out of there is a pain unless you know someone flying.
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by forjenns

I've seen more and more cakes on here where they have doubled the height of a particular sized pan for instance 3 layers of the 9x2 over a double 12x2 with a double 6" might give an interesting effect and take away from the difference in size. You can use the space on the 12" for lots of decorating and scenery especially with the ideals you have come up with that could easily become a "river" around the cake with room for a fisherman/woman

.



Ooh I love cakes that have different heights for the tiers. They look so elegant. My only question is...how do they cut into that? I have seen some that are really tall on top and a normal 4" on the bottom but I can't figure out how you would cut and serve that.
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by ibeeflower

I have seen some that are really tall on top and a normal 4" on the bottom but I can't figure out how you would cut and serve that.



There's usually a cake board in the middle. They are served as two separate tiers.
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWR41

Quote:
Originally Posted by ibeeflower

I have seen some that are really tall on top and a normal 4" on the bottom but I can't figure out how you would cut and serve that.



There's usually a cake board in the middle. They are served as two separate tiers.



WOW. I learn something every time I come here. Thank you! I will be trying this out.
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