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QUICK HELP! When using a flower nail for a heating core . .

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
How do you place the flower nail in the cake batter to use as a heating core?? I've never had to do it before. Or maybe someone can tell me - do I NEED a heating core for a 11x9" sheet?
Learning as I go . . . and lovin' every minute!
Cake Designs by Erin
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Learning as I go . . . and lovin' every minute!
Cake Designs by Erin
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post #2 of 10
I don't think it would hurt to use one, it should just take the dome down a bit, reducing your temperature will help too.

To use the nail just poke it thru the baking parchment you use to line the bottom of the tin icon_smile.gif

HTH
Gray
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
Hmm . . . I didn't use parchment. I always use Cake Release
Learning as I go . . . and lovin' every minute!
Cake Designs by Erin
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Learning as I go . . . and lovin' every minute!
Cake Designs by Erin
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post #4 of 10
I would put one or two flower nails in, yes. Grease and line your pan as usual. Then grease your flower nail(s) on the stem and both sides of the head and place, flat head down, in the pan. Place it right in the centre if you are using one, or spread along the centre line if you are using two. Fill your pan with batter taking care not to move your nails - slide them back into place if they move, don't pick them up and plunge into the batter.

Your cake will probably bake quicker than usual so you need to keep an eye on it. Good luck!
post #5 of 10
Make sure you use a METAL nail. Prepare it as you do the pan itself and place it in the middle (or close to it) of the pan.

Thanks for the tip about sticking it through the parchment. I'll have to try that thumbs_up.gif
post #6 of 10
Since you posted so early this a.m. I assume you have alread bakedicon_smile.gif Here is my opinions on this matter:

It never fails to amaze me that people use a heat core for this small of a cake- And mamy of them *insisting!* it is necessary. I have baked cakes up to 16" round w/o even one nail, core or pan wrap w/o problems.
Having said that, it won't hurts to use a nail. Just place it in the pan before pouring in the batter carefully around it so as not to move it.
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

Since you posted so early this a.m. I assume you have alread bakedicon_smile.gif Here is my opinions on this matter:

It never fails to amaze me that people use a heat core for this small of a cake- And mamy of them *insisting!* it is necessary. I have baked cakes up to 16" round w/o even one nail, core or pan wrap w/o problems.
Having said that, it won't hurts to use a nail. Just place it in the pan before pouring in the batter carefully around it so as not to move it.



Wow. Are your pans 2" high? My cakes take way too long to bake. Looking for solutions.
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

Since you posted so early this a.m. I assume you have alread bakedicon_smile.gif Here is my opinions on this matter:

It never fails to amaze me that people use a heat core for this small of a cake- And mamy of them *insisting!* it is necessary. I have baked cakes up to 16" round w/o even one nail, core or pan wrap w/o problems.
Having said that, it won't hurts to use a nail. Just place it in the pan before pouring in the batter carefully around it so as not to move it.



I don't use them either and up until now (knock on wood) I haven't needed them. I do have one just in case but with my Magic Line pans that are 2 inches in height I haven't had to use one. The cakes cook evenly and there is never a dome. I really love these pans.
post #9 of 10
Hi, i have been baking for 17 yrs. Never have i used a heat core or nail in any size cake i make . Never had to. If you feel the need, then i don,t blame you as to how you bake. We are all different and that is a good thing. lol!!!
post #10 of 10
i use 2"deep pans - Wilton and Magic Line - always haveicon_smile.gif
As the others have said, there is eally little need for heat cores! It could be your oven is off calabration. Have you had it checked out?
For any pan that takes one cake mix (such as 10 round; 12x8 sheet etc) I bake at 300 degrees for approx. 20 minutes, then turn the oven up to 325 for about an equal time. I bake mostly by 'nose'/smell. If you can smell that wonderful cake aroma in the next room it most likely is done - test w/a finger in the center. If it springs back at all the cake should be done. For larger cakes I follow the same instructions only for longer times. A 16"x2" round takes about 45-60 minutes at each setting. Baking at these lower temps will yield a flat, moist cake w/o that hump in the middle or dry sides!

I retired from baking about 5 yrs ago & now I'm beginning to forget exactly the recipes & times of baking so you are going to have to find what works best for you and your oven. BTW: I bakes in many different ovens, including commercial convections ovens and used basically the same instructions with the same results.
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