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Do I need to spilt and fill cake before frosting? - Page 2

post #16 of 26
I think having a 12" and 10" stacked is going to look short and squaty. What size dummies did you order? You could use the dummy for the wedding along with a couple tiers of real cake. If you ordered a 10" dummy, you could make a real 8" and 6" and have extra cake in the back.

About the buttercream, I'm in America, so we're used to buttercream, not royal icing. The swirls would work with buttercream or royal. If the UK is used to large amounts of royal, then do that. Another option might be white chocolate ganache, but that would be really expensive!

I homeschool because I've seen the village and I don't want it raising my children.

 

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I homeschool because I've seen the village and I don't want it raising my children.

 

http://whynotethiopia2.blogspot.com/

 

 

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post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinarina1

Have been practising buttercream roses and rose swirls all day



What are the buttercream roses for if you're making a rose swirl cake?

Quote:
Originally Posted by tinarina1

What I think I might do to make it a little easier is a 12" and a 10" (tiered)



A 10" is way too big for a top tier -- you should add a 6" on top.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tinarina1

I froze a buttercream rose last night, got it out this morning and it defrosted very quickly as it's quite warm here at the moment - in fact it looked very soft. I think perhaps the frosting had a little too much liquid so will try another batch with less next time.



Again, I don't know what the roses are for, but freezing them isn't a solution to prevent them from melting because they will just return to the same consistency before they were frozen. Buttercream roses can be air dried a week or more before needed. Once they're dried, they can easily be picked up and placed where needed without fear of melting or falling off. If the roses are drooping as you make them, add more powdered sugar for stiff roses that won't droop, and they'll dry faster too.
HOW TO:
Make tip #127D (giant rose tip) Ruffle cake,
Write with icing,
Make buttercream roses on a stick:
http://s984.photobucket.com/albums/ae322/Unlimited1cakes/
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HOW TO:
Make tip #127D (giant rose tip) Ruffle cake,
Write with icing,
Make buttercream roses on a stick:
http://s984.photobucket.com/albums/ae322/Unlimited1cakes/
Reply
post #18 of 26
Thread Starter 
Sorry I meant a buttercream rose swirl which I froze on a piece of wax paper. I just imagined them all melting on the cake, in the heat of the room, and sliding off! Might that happen?

That sounds a good idea about the cake tiers. It was a 10" dummy I ordered so could use that at the bottom and then make an 8" and a 6" as you suggested.

Thanks.
post #19 of 26
Tinarina, I'm sorry but I have to agree with Carmijok on a few points made. If this is your first cake on this kind of scale it might be best if you leave it to a professional who has the experience in this kind of thing. I am doing my parents 25th anniversary cake but theirs is fairly simple, won't feed that many people, and the cake is not really for display since they are doing it in their house in the middle of July.

But, I have done research. I first figured how many servings necessary, then figured out the cake sizes, I also did various test runs of different cakes to find one that could be carved, or filled.

I also took into consideration that it is 100 degree right now, and will only get hotter so I decided on a high ratio shortening based frosting. It took me questions and practice, but I have the icing down now. And I'm not doing fondant. Just a simple white frosting.

Also, I did my decorations out of gumpaste. I did them this past weekend so they will be ready by the time the cake is needed. Since you are doing roses on it this may not apply to you.

Your daughter's day is important...especially because you are her mother. I know my mom will want to spend a lot of time with me during the wedding process and she will be wrapped up in all the wedding hoopla right before my big day.

But if it really means that much to you and you really want to do it then just do your research. Search the forums because often other people have asked a similar question and you can see what other people have replied. Be careful with your frosting though. Do your research to make sure it will stand up to any heat in your area and won't melt off the cake.

Good luck!
post #20 of 26
Do a dummy cake...all three layers....for the wedding...( a display cake) and bake regular sheet cakes for the kitchen to accomadate your guests. Stack all three tiers, tie together with dowels going thru all tiers....Ice the cake with your rose swirls. You can do this a few days before the wedding and let it just stand out in the air.....it will crust and dry a bit.. you don't have anything that will spoil and no need to refrigerate.....does this make sense....?
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SMILE - and people will smile back.

www.myspace.com/mycakesite
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post #21 of 26
I know how special doing a wedding cake for your dd is. My first wedding cake was a 4-tier fondant-covered castle for my oldest dd. I flew to NY and made it in her small apartment. Because of problems with supplies I had ordered to be drop-shipped to her, I missed her party with her bridesmaids. I had to be at the venue early to set up the cake and couldn't go with her to her hair appointment. Nothing went right that day and I didn't get to help her get dressed at the church.

That was the most disappointing, stress-filled week of my life. Don't get me wrong - - doing her wedding cake was very important to me. But since it was my first, there was so much I didn't know and that made it so much more difficult.

The cake was beautiful, my dd was gorgeous, the wedding went off without a problem and all was well. The reception was perfect and everyone loved the cake. And after 2 good stiff drinks, I was able to enjoy it. Was it worth it? Well, that's an entirely different question. What matters is, would it be worth it to you?
post #22 of 26
You should do what ever you feel is MOST comfortable for you. Not sure what buttercream recipe you use & by no means am I the expert. But, in my personal experiences, I've noticed that my buttercream is pretty stiff before I add cream. When I first started making this particular recipe...I just kept on adding cream until I smooth my spatula through easily.

BUTTTT, if maybe you just added a tiny bit & tested piping. If it's too stiff, add another bit & then tested...you may get a stiffer consistancy for piping & the technique you're using could hold up better.

I've also heard that ALL butter buttercream is not good for heat. I've heard that you COULD go with all shortening based buttercream but some people don't like that it has NO butter at all. The shortening holds up to heat better.

If you wanna try my buttercream, I use Indydebi's recipe here on CC. It's 1 cup unsalted butter, 1 cup shortening (preferably with trans fat IN it for better texture...although, I use a shortening with out it and it turns out fine) and 1 tablespoon of flavor. Beat till smooth. Add 2 lbs of powdered sugar, slowly. Mix good. THEN, add cold cream one tablespoon at a time till you get the right consistancy. Normally it's 4 or 5 tablespoons for spreading on a cake. Using the cream makes it not as horribly sweet....

I hope I didn't discourage you in my earlier post. I just know how stressed out I get and thought it would be easier to scale it back to make sure you enjoy the day. But, you do have plenty of time to work out kinks in your process. If you stay focused, you can do it for sure. But, don't feel bad if you go the conservative route. My fellow always tells me ...pretty cakes are great but how they taste is what's really important.

I hope it all turns out for you.
post #23 of 26
SInce you already have a few months, how about making a full fledged mock up of the cake as a dress rehearsal. IMHO, the frosting of the cakes really isn't the make or break part of the cake--the actual baking and stacking of the cake is where the heart is on this one (not to mention transporting it).

You must be comfortable with the baking, filling, resting, leveling, frosting, doweling, and stacking of this cake if it is going to get to the wedding. I've made the rose swirl cake so many times, and it really isn't hard once you get your rhythm going (and for that you can practice on dummies). I think practicing on dummies is great, but nothing beats the experience of baking and stacking and working with real, live cake and frosting.

that being said, I'd vote to order a cake and enjoy spending the days with your daughter. I would never trade time with my mother before my wedding for a cake made by her own hands. (an aunt, a family friend doing the cake is one thing...but my mother? I'd want her with me, not working for me.)
post #24 of 26
I'd get it done a week before the wedding and stick it in the freezer. Pull it out the morning of the wedding and you're ready to go. Seriously, the rosettes are easy, forgiving, and they look great. You can watch YouTube videos about stacking, filling, etc. It's not like your trying to do some 7 tier monstrocity with 100s of gumpaste flowers in 2 days. You've got time, you can make a little tier cake for family and practice driving around and stacking. I think it's great that you want to do this for your daughter. I'm glad you chose an easy, beautiful design.

I homeschool because I've seen the village and I don't want it raising my children.

 

http://whynotethiopia2.blogspot.com/

 

 

Reply

I homeschool because I've seen the village and I don't want it raising my children.

 

http://whynotethiopia2.blogspot.com/

 

 

Reply
post #25 of 26
Thread Starter 
Thank you all so much for your replies. People are so helpful on this forum. The buttercream recipe I used was more butter than fat but think I will try equal quantities next time, with a small amount of cream. I have one using meringue powder too which I might try. Will just keep practising but in plenty of time to change my mind!

I have lots of time watching youtube videos - now I need to do it myself!

Thanks again.
post #26 of 26
OH! Yes, I saw a recipe with meringue powder in it too. It does help to stiffen. That makes sense.

Just trust yourself. I only do a cake every once in a while...so my learning curve has been stretched out big time. But, if you are on a mission to do this - you'll find out after you start practicing which route is best for you.

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