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You CAN freeze a fondant covered cake successfully - Page 2

post #16 of 31

Box the completed cake. Wrap box in several layers of saran/plastic wrap and foil.  Freeze. 

24 hrs. before serving, place wrapped box in fridge. 

A few hrs. before serving, place wrapped box on counter. 

Right before display/serving, unbox cake. 

Virtually no sweating.

post #17 of 31
Perhapsm I'll try it next time although I'm afraid
post #18 of 31

I've done it many times............here are the most recent examples--both frozen for a week and defrosted by the bride [as described above] the day before the wedding:

 

Navy blue fondant flowers with handmade silver dragees

klick+bride+cake+small.JPG

 

Black chocolate fondant with dry dusted gold plaque

Klick+groom+cake+small.JPG

post #19 of 31
They look great! Does it matter the brand of fondant? Do I have to put them in a box sometimes they don't fit in a box when they are big cakes
post #20 of 31
Good to now!! Thank you thumbs_up.gif! Maybenot did you freeze the cake whit flower's and dragees?
post #21 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daina-M View Post

They look great! Does it matter the brand of fondant? Do I have to put them in a box sometimes they don't fit in a box when they are big cakes


Yes, they must be boxed and wrapped per ALL of the instructions I provided above.

post #22 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by anavillatoro1 View Post

Good to now!! Thank you thumbs_up.gif! Maybenot did you freeze the cake whit flower's and dragees?


Yes, the cake was completely decorated and the photo was taken after it was defrosted.

post #23 of 31
Thanks thumbs_up.gif
post #24 of 31

Would adding a little tylose powder to the fondant help with any stickiness that may occur after thawing? If so how much should I add to say 500g of fondant? Would it be okay to freeze the tiers seperately and assemble them after they have been sitting out for quite a few hours?

post #25 of 31

I don't see where adding Tylose will help at all.  It's the process that I described that keeps condensation from forming on the surface.

 

Yes, you could stack them after defrosting, BUT you'd want to wait several hours after the cakes have come to room temp to be certain that they're not even slightly tacky.

post #26 of 31
Ok...need some advice! Early in December, I made a red velvet/cream cheese frosting wedding cake. I covered it in LMF and decorated the whole thing. Then an ice storm hit our area and the wedding was cancelled. The bride/mother of the bride have not filled me in on when the wedding will be rescheduled for. My husband says I should thaw it out and sell it at a drastically reduced price and then remake the cake for the wedding whenever it is. What do you think? How long can it stay in the freezer before I have to remake it? It is in a deep freezer that has nothing else in it.
post #27 of 31

idk--i always told peeps that the wedding taking place was not a requirement for the cake to happen--this would be one of the reasons why i set things up like that--i told them that storage is also up to them--

 

if i was you i'd probably re-make the cake and then hate myself because there's probably nothing wrong with the frozen one--

 

hey--probably just bring it to temp gradually and if it needs sprucing up just re-cover it? maybe

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if you had your own tv show what would be your favorite commercial/sponsor

i think i'd like ghirardelli and hershey for starters...

Reply
post #28 of 31

If the box is really well wrapped and the freezer operates consistently, the cake will be fine for many months--at least 6. 

 

Now, if the client knows that it's been frozen, I'd let her choose what to do with the cake.  I'd get hold of her on Jan. 2 and I'd tell her that she has 3 choices--one to be made IMMEDIATELY---pay for the cake & take it NOW [to do with as she pleases]; pay for the cake and, if the wedding is held in the next 3 months, use the cake [as is, with no option for complaints or refunds]; pay for the cake and allow me to dispose of it as I see fit. 

 

If the wedding is definitely more than 3 months out from the original date, I'd tell her that she has to pay for this cake NOW and that a new one will cost her the same amount in the future.

 

Of course, you could also have her pay for the cake and take it to her own freezer and let her decide at her leisure.

post #29 of 31

I do this ALL the time...(bake, torte, fill, and ice the cake) in advance.  Just make sure to wrap them with suran wrap...Make sure you let them sit in the freezer about 15 b4 you wrap them so they will be firm and the butter cream wont move.  This will save so much time...I have sold many cakes that I have frozen at least a week b4 they were fully decorated.  However, once the cake come to room temp the fondant will become sticky.  good luck.  Also, you can just test it out with like a 6inch cake prior to her wedding for taste and any other concerns.

post #30 of 31

I'm glad someone rebooted this thread because I am shipping a cake at the end of April. I was planning to have some foam supports around the cake to keep it from slipping. Now I'm worried that the condensation as it defrosts will cause problems. 

 

any advice?

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