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Attention: fruit cake bakers!!! Mature vs non mature price - Page 2

post #16 of 24
Thread Starter 
I had problems with the pre soaked fruit method. Cakes come out greasy and fruits sink. Some rise and come out well, some don't. I also tried the pre boiling fruits method. Cake did not rise. The cake did not taste good too. It had cocoa. However, this method has worked out very well for me:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bdhE1AAIduU&list=UUl1-QY2swbDoI8MmBU__q4g&index=4&feature=plcp
I adjust fruit amounts and types. So far the cakes I baked about 2 months ago are ok. I fed them 3 times. Will they last for one year without going bad? TIA.
Life is short. If there was ever a moment to follow your passion and do something that matters to you, that moment is now. -quotebites.com

http://m.facebook.com/Edible.Elegance.cakes.Zimbabwe
http://www.flickr.com/photos/73178569@N05/
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Life is short. If there was ever a moment to follow your passion and do something that matters to you, that moment is now. -quotebites.com

http://m.facebook.com/Edible.Elegance.cakes.Zimbabwe
http://www.flickr.com/photos/73178569@N05/
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post #17 of 24
this is a recipe for a fruitcake that can be eaten immediately
it only has three ingredients and is very easy to make.
It is probably a good place to start for a fruitcake novice.

I like to add a bit of booze to it so just replace a couple of tablespoons of the milk for rum or brandy .

I am a Queenslander so my choice is Bundaberg Rum. .


1 kg mixed fruit
700 mls chocolate milk
2 cups self raising flour
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Preparation method
Prep: 8 hours   | Cook: 2 hours | Extra time: 1 day 14 hours
1. Soak the mixed fruit in the chocolate milk overnight in the fridge
2. Preheat oven to 150 degrees C. Line the bottom and sides of 25cm square tin with either baking paper or alfoil, with the lining coming over the sides by about 5cm. Spray the paper or alfoil with some cooking spray.
3. Sift the flour into the soaked fruit one cup at a time and mix in well after each addition. Pour the mixture into the prepared cake tin and cook for 1½ to 2 hours. After 1½ hours insert a skewer or cake tester into the centre of the cake and if it comes out clean your cake is ready to be taken from the oven.
4. Leave the in cake tin until cooled and then put onto a wire rack to fully cool.
post #18 of 24
I pre soak all of my fruit for regardless, but the majority of my customers (the ones who want fruit cake at least for christmas) know to place there orders in September/October
i do believe that maturing the cake gives is better but at the time, but i have never charged extra for this, considering the amount you use to feed a cake, an entire bottle of brandy is enough to last me feeding over one christmas period so the cost is vastly spread out amongst every one so it makes little difference to just one customers price.

I usually make extra cakes around christmas time incase i do get any last minute orders, and the majority of them gets used up, but any spares i am quite happy to give as gifts or serve up for family guests icon_smile.gif
post #19 of 24
Thread Starter 
I would like to know if the recipe from the youtube link above will give me a cake that will last a year. It comes out better than some I have tried. The fruits are not presoaked. The brandy is only added after baking.
Life is short. If there was ever a moment to follow your passion and do something that matters to you, that moment is now. -quotebites.com

http://m.facebook.com/Edible.Elegance.cakes.Zimbabwe
http://www.flickr.com/photos/73178569@N05/
Reply
Life is short. If there was ever a moment to follow your passion and do something that matters to you, that moment is now. -quotebites.com

http://m.facebook.com/Edible.Elegance.cakes.Zimbabwe
http://www.flickr.com/photos/73178569@N05/
Reply
post #20 of 24
I cut my fruit into raisin iszed pieces before soaking. I let my presoaked fruit drain overnight before I mix it into the batter. I can;t tell if it sinks because the cake is so stuffed...

Any fruitcake will last a year if you keep it in a cool place in a airtight tin or container. I add three doses of brandy or rum to my fruitcakes spaced right after baking and then three weeks apart. At six months I would add another dose if I want the cake to age for a full year.

Fruitcakes covered in marzipan and fondant or royal icing need only to be kept in a cool place. They will last for 2 years.
post #21 of 24
Thread Starter 
Thank you very much.
Life is short. If there was ever a moment to follow your passion and do something that matters to you, that moment is now. -quotebites.com

http://m.facebook.com/Edible.Elegance.cakes.Zimbabwe
http://www.flickr.com/photos/73178569@N05/
Reply
Life is short. If there was ever a moment to follow your passion and do something that matters to you, that moment is now. -quotebites.com

http://m.facebook.com/Edible.Elegance.cakes.Zimbabwe
http://www.flickr.com/photos/73178569@N05/
Reply
post #22 of 24
From all the wonderful advice on here I have decided to post my questions.

I am baking our wedding cake for this Christmas, looking at all the pictures in the magazines I love how deep the cake layers all look.

My problems come in that the tins I am renting (hexagonal) come in a range of 2.5inches to 3inches deep. I have read that lots of these cakes will be made with layers inside, to get the effect of deep layers. I don't want our cake to look flat and not relatively professional having made a lot of other occasion cakes. Should I make 2 inch deep fruit cakes and then marzipan two together for each tier?

I hope you can help.
post #23 of 24
How "deep" your cakes look is a function of the diameter. Older wedding cake tins (my mother had to buy hers so I have them for reference) were 3" deep but 4"-6"-8" and therefore looked "deep".

Making two 2" deep layers with marzipan in between is a good solution for larger pans. For a professional finish, cover with flat rolled sections of marzipan on the sides after you pack all crevices in the stack.
post #24 of 24
Thanks for the help.

If I do smaller rolled sections of marzipan can I do the same with sugarpaste rolled icing as I am not using royal icing to cover the cake?
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