Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cake Decorating Business › delivery fees
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

delivery fees - Page 2

post #16 of 27
Quote:
Quote:

I think people like to rail against Jason just because he's Jason.



I was thinking the same thing.
post #17 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

If, as the customer, I take the time to find your business, peruse your offerings, decide on what I want to order (mentally commit), and consider delivery as a real option, I don't want to go thru any part of the process with you only to find out that the cost of delivery is way beyond what I consider reasonable. That's a waste of my time.


Agreed...and as you said, delivery is an option. Pickup is always available as a cheaper alternative. Just like with any other premium option, if the customer really wants delivery and needs to stay within a certain budget we work with the customer to reduce the cost of the cake or make the delivery to a closer location.

Quote:
Quote:

I really do think that should be disclosed on the website or at the outset of an order inquiry.


The amount is disclosed as soon as the customer inquires about the order (or before if they ask specifically about delivery costs).

Your posts in this thread exemplify why we don't specifically say on our web site that we charge $60/hour or $1/minute for deliveries: for some customers, the focus would shift to the delivery charge and why it is so high instead of staying on the cake. It really is not that different from charging $1/mile...in some areas $1/minute would actually be cheaper than $1/mile.
post #18 of 27
Thanks for validating my personal policy to NEVER deal with any business that doesn't disclose delivery charges up front and in writing--without my having to ask.

You say that you see my point, but a few paragraphs down, you justify NOT putting the delivery charges on the website because "....the focus would shift to the delivery charge and why it is so high instead of staying on the cake".

What that says to me is you're willing to get me significantly invested in the cake that I've envisioned and then when I ask about delivery, force me to grapple with choices about $ & locations-----that's the "waste" of time I'm talking about.

Personally, I walk away from those scenarios with no regrets and a loud mouth about why I'm not using that business:
"Well, we got all the way through the ordering process and when I asked about delivery, it added so much to the price that I had to say no thanks. Fifteen minutes on the phone for nothing.........The next place I call will have the delivery charges on the website, or I WON'T call !"

Rae
I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
Reply
I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
Reply
post #19 of 27
So I (or Jason) should answer the phone "Superstar Pastry Design delivery is $20 within Anchorage or $3.50 per mile calculated one-way outside of town unless of course you don't need delivery, how may I help you?"

Come on. Delivery isn't requested or discussed for 90% of my non-wedding cake orders and I'm pretty sure that's the same for most of us. For wedding cakes it is discussed during the consultation. I'm not gonna get into options customers don't need until they need them. It shouldn't be on the front page of the website either because Jason is right, customers may focus of the less important factors before the more important ones. Now, if your business was 90% delivery then yes that is a valid thing to discuss immediately.
post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

Thanks for validating my personal policy to NEVER deal with any business that doesn't disclose delivery charges up front and in writing--without my having to ask.


We do disclose delivery charges up front, either in writing (via email) or over the phone, and customers do not have to ask to receive this information, assuming they want delivery in the first place. In all cases the delivery charge appears on the invoice which is emailed to the customer once the order is finalized. The customer is free to change their mind about delivery at any time during the process.

Quote:
Quote:

What that says to me is you're willing to get me significantly invested in the cake that I've envisioned and then when I ask about delivery, force me to grapple with choices about $ & locations-----that's the "waste" of time I'm talking about.


Yes, the decision to pay for delivery or pick up a cake is indeed monumental. The choices are: pick up the cake, pay for delivery to your desired location, or pay a smaller amount for delivery to a closer location.

Quote:
Quote:

"Well, we got all the way through the ordering process and when I asked about delivery, it added so much to the price that I had to say no thanks.


We have never had a customer cancel an order because of the delivery charge. As I said above, if delivery is too much the customer picks up the cake, and if delivery is a must but the order is over budget we work with the customer to reduce the cost of the cake.

Quote:
Quote:

Fifteen minutes on the phone for nothing.........


The first thing I ask (on the phone or in an email) is where the customer is located and whether they want pickup or delivery.

If you would really get so upset over a delivery charge that you would just cancel the order outright instead of picking it up or modifying the order to stay within budget, then I probably wouldn't want you as a customer in the first place.
post #21 of 27
[quote="jason_kraft"}

If you would really get that upset over a delivery charge that you would just cancel the order outright instead of picking it up or modifying the order to stay within budget, then I probably wouldn't want you as a customer in the first place.[/quote]

thumbs_up.gif
post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by KoryAK

Now, if your business was 90% delivery then yes that is a valid thing to discuss immediately.



100% due to zoning.

It's on your website and easily located--perfect. The circumstance of delivering in the Anchorage area is , to say the least, exceptional.

I consider an informed customer the best customer.

"If you would really get that upset over a delivery charge that you would just cancel the order outright instead of picking it up or modifying the order to stay within budget, then I probably wouldn't want you as a customer in the first place."

You, sir, are correct in that assumption. Every deal has a deal-breaker. Clearly, you have discovered mine.

Rae
I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
Reply
I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
Reply
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

Every deal has a deal-breaker. Clearly, you have discovered mine.


I'm a little confused here...you stated earlier that your personal policy is "to NEVER deal with any business that doesn't disclose delivery charges up front and in writing--without my having to ask". Since we do disclose delivery charges up front, I'm not sure what the issue is.

Here's what a typical order inquiry would sound like:
Customer: "I'd like to order a cake."
Business: "Would you like to pick up your cake or have it delivered?"
Customer: "Delivered."
Business: "Where is the delivery address?"
<customer states address>
<business looks up address in Google Maps, address is 15 minutes from kitchen>
Business: "Your quote for delivering this order is $30, or you can pick it up from <kitchen address> at no extra charge."

To clarify, is this the point where you would become irate and make it your mission to destroy my business?

If so -- for my own curiosity -- what would need to be added to the web site to abate your fury? And how do you have it worded on your bakery's web site?
post #24 of 27
Hmmm. I'm not sure why this is such an issue.

I was charging $2 per kilometer (or $1/km each way). I also use google maps. I like Jason's formula. I have planning on increasing my delivery charges because it is a service I provide (mostly for wedding cake clients) that does not make me any money, and eats up a whole lot of my weekend with my family. So, my new calculation I'm working on will be based on kilometers travelled, plus time spent x number of delivery people required. Because my husband delivers the cakes with me in 99% of cases, it is only fair to be paying him for his time also.

I am upfront about delivery charges, and yes, clients do factor it into their decisions on whether they will get someone to pick up the cake for them, or ask me to do it. I have never lost a potential client due to my delivery fees. As I said, I really prefer NOT spending three hours on a Saturday delivering cakes! I <3 pickups!

Life's too short to make cake pops.
___________________________________
www.sweetperfection.com.au

www.sweetperfectioncakes.blogspot.com.au/
www.facebook.com/sweetperfectioncakes (come visit sometime!)

Reply

Life's too short to make cake pops.
___________________________________
www.sweetperfection.com.au

www.sweetperfectioncakes.blogspot.com.au/
www.facebook.com/sweetperfectioncakes (come visit sometime!)

Reply
post #25 of 27
Well, I have used the term "in writing" several times, generally meaning that it's stated clearly on the website--as it is on Kory's under FAQs............

I do an internet search for probably 90%+ of my transactions with new businesses these days, looking for reviews (by the way, Yelp shows your ex-business as CLOSED, so the new proprietor might want to look into that.....it likely stops potential customers in their tracks unless they take the time to go to the page, anyway, and see the disclaimer about under new management), and any other information that may help me to hit a bulls eye the first time I call, rather than spinning my wheels only to find out about things like unexpected delivery fees, etc.

I prefer to refer back to things in print, should there be a problem.

The way I handle things would have little relevance to a brick & mortar business because I don't have a bakery or website for orders. I operate under cottage laws out of my home and I generally deal with people who find me by word of mouth. When I have an inquiry--by phone, in person, or by e-mail--the first thing I verify my availability for the date requested. I respond via e-mail, citing my policies (including delivery information) and requesting a response to hold the date. Communication continues via e-mail to keep up the printed record.

Kudos for making sure that delivery IS virtually the first thing discussed when someone calls about a cake.............Personally, when I have been the customer, I've found that it is generally the last thing mentioned during the process.

What you would see as a "mission to destroy your business", I would see as a reasonable comment about why I chose to not use a particular business:
"Did the cake come from XYZ? No, I needed it delivered and they're delivery charges were way too high, so I did some more research and went with ABC. That'll teach me not to call before I've checked the website for some basic info."

Rae
I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
Reply
I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
Reply
post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

Every deal has a deal-breaker. Clearly, you have discovered mine.


I'm a little confused here...you stated earlier that your personal policy is "to NEVER deal with any business that doesn't disclose delivery charges up front and in writing--without my having to ask". Since we do disclose delivery charges up front, I'm not sure what the issue is.

Here's what a typical order inquiry would sound like:
Customer: "I'd like to order a cake."
Business: "Would you like to pick up your cake or have it delivered?"
Customer: "Delivered."
Business: "Where is the delivery address?"
<customer states address>
<business looks up address in Google Maps, address is 15 minutes from kitchen>
Business: "Your quote for delivering this order is $30, or you can pick it up from <kitchen address> at no extra charge."

To clarify, is this the point where you would become irate and make it your mission to destroy my business?

If so -- for my own curiosity -- what would need to be added to the web site to abate your fury? And how do you have it worded on your bakery's web site?



You've never made me laugh out loud before. Well done, sir.
post #27 of 27
I charged $35.00 for the first 10 miles and $1.50 per mile after that (based on oneway mileage). I have it posted on my website, in the contract and on their invoice. Brides expect to pay for delivery and set-up and it's a very common practice here.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cake Decorating Business
Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cake Decorating Business › delivery fees