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UK Bakers - help please!

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
My husband's boss is English. I met him last week at an after work event. My husband mentioned there that I bake. His boss is planning to have a celebration for about 20 people for Queen Elizabeth's Diamond Jubilee and he's asked me to make something for the party. I was thinking fruitcake. Would this be appropriate? Would anyone have a fruitcake recipe? Would you cover it in marzipan?

Any information would be EXTREMELY appreciated!! icon_biggrin.gif
post #2 of 14
Thread Starter 
Anyone??
post #3 of 14
well fruit cake is very british, but i know only one person that likes it! how about victoria sponge(even more british) or this http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-1370364/Prince-William-asks-special-wedding-cake-Rich-Tea-biscuits-dark-chocolate.html and decorate in white red and blue.
post #4 of 14
and i have tried this recipe here, tara w rich fruit cake. yes people put apricot jam, cover in marzipan, then ice it. good luck. http://www.netmums.com/coffeehouse/food-feeding-555/recipes-557/387138-cake-decoraters-receipes.html
post #5 of 14
Rich fruit cake is very British. If you're unsure of a recipe, you can't go far wrong if you Google Delia Smith (or Saint Delia, as I like to call her!)

But, yes, Victoria sponge is also very British, filled with strawberry jam and whipped cream.

Although Prince William had the chocolate biscuit cake at his wedding, that REALLY isn't a very British thing at all....In all my years, I've NEVER been asked for one (although my best friend has a cake business in Ireland and chocolate biscuit cake - as they call it - is very, very popular there).

Hope this helps... if you want to know anything else, feel free to drop me a line.

Suzanne x
Inside this fat body, there's a thin woman screaming to get out...... but I can usually shut her up with chocolate!
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Inside this fat body, there's a thin woman screaming to get out...... but I can usually shut her up with chocolate!
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post #6 of 14
Since you only have a couple of weeks I wouldn't do a fruit cake, simply because they are best if made well in advance and "fed" with alcohol to mature. Also, as previously stated, not that many people love the cake, though most will eat a tiny piece if that's all there is icon_biggrin.gif

I would also go with a Victoria Sponge (here's one http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/victoriasponge_13555 )...the basic recipe is similar to what you guys call Pound Cake I think.

Or chocolate cake. Yum.
post #7 of 14
If you intend to cover the cake with fondant you will need a more denser sponge than Victoria as it is too springy.
here is a link to Delias website for fruit cake. The best thing about fruit cake is that they can be made well in advance. You also may want to check with hubby's boss as it may be possible that he is not fond of fruit cake.
Me I love it.
http://www.deliaonline.com/how-to-cook/baking/scaling-up-cake-recipes.html
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rosiepan

If you intend to cover the cake with fondant you will need a more denser sponge than Victoria as it is too springy.
here is a link to Delias website for fruit cake. The best thing about fruit cake is that they can be made well in advance. You also may want to check with hubby's boss as it may be possible that he is not fond of fruit cajavascript:emoticon('icon_smile.gif')ke.
Me I love it.
http://www.deliaonline.com/how-to-cook/baking/scaling-up-cake-recipes.html


ALL my sponge cakes are a Victoria sponge - ie equal weights of butter, sugar, eggs (cracked weight) and self-raising flour. They hold up perfectly to marzipan and sugarpaste. icon_smile.gif
Inside this fat body, there's a thin woman screaming to get out...... but I can usually shut her up with chocolate!
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Inside this fat body, there's a thin woman screaming to get out...... but I can usually shut her up with chocolate!
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post #9 of 14
post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 
Oh thank all of you SOOOO much!! This gives me some great ideas to think about!! icon_biggrin.gif
post #11 of 14
To celebrate the jubilee, consider a Queen Elizabeth Cake. It's a date cake with coconut broiled topping and does NOT require any big fuss or making ahead. And as it was created at the time of Her Maj's coronation, it's a good cake to celebrate with.

You can use Google to search, but make sure the recipe has the topping as well as the cake, for example

http://sharonoddiebrown.blogspot.ca/2011/08/queen-elizabeth-cake.html
post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
thanks Irene! That looks yummy as well! So many options to consider icon_smile.gif
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by BakingIrene

To celebrate the jubilee, consider a Queen Elizabeth Cake. It's a date cake with coconut broiled topping and does NOT require any big fuss or making ahead. And as it was created at the time of Her Maj's coronation, it's a good cake to celebrate with.

You can use Google to search, but make sure the recipe has the topping as well as the cake, for example

http://sharonoddiebrown.blogspot.ca/2011/08/queen-elizabeth-cake.html


I've never heard of it! icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif

Another idea that sprang to mind is Eton Mess. It's not a cake, but it is a lovely, light dessert.
Inside this fat body, there's a thin woman screaming to get out...... but I can usually shut her up with chocolate!
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Inside this fat body, there's a thin woman screaming to get out...... but I can usually shut her up with chocolate!
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post #14 of 14
Queen Elizabeth Cake is a Canadian cake.

Queen Elizabeth Cake is either, a cake created by a Canadian in honor of Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, and sold to raise money for the war efforts during World War II - or - it is believed that it was created by the Queen Mother to support fund raising efforts for the Church of England.

Queen Elizabeth Cake
5 oz chopped dates
1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
1 cup boiling water
7 1/2 oz sugar
4 oz butter, softened
1 egg
1 teaspoon vanilla
6 oz flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 oz chopped pecans or walnuts
Cooked Icing
5 tablespoons brown sugar
5 tablespoons cream
2 tablespoons butter
3 oz shredded coconut
1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Butter and line 20 x 30cm cake tin.
2. sift flour, baking powder and salt.
3. Combine dates and bicarb, and pour boiling water over them. Let mixture stand.
4. Cream the butter with the sugar. Add egg and vanilla, and beat well.
5. Mix in dry ingredients, pour in date mixture, and then the nuts, to combine well.
6. Pour into the tin. Bake 25-30 minutes until golden on top.
7. Remove from oven and let stand.
Icing
Over medium heat, bring sugar, cream and butter to a boil; boil 3 minutes until thickened. Pour over cake in tin. Spread evenly, and sprinkle coconut over top.
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