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to freeze or not to freeze?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Hi all,
I just baked a vanilla cake from scratch. I made one layer today and I'm doing one layer tomorrow and two layers on Saturday for a mother's day cake.

Should I freeze the cake I made today? Or just Saran wrap and place it in the fridge until Saturday?
Ive never frozen a cake so I'm hesitant about this.

All help and advice is appreciated!

Flower
post #2 of 13
Freeze. Refrigeration is not a kind thing to do to a nice cake.
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post #3 of 13
Wrap your cakes well in plastic wrap and freeze them it will keep your cakes moist. Refrigerating cakes actually speeds up the process of drying them out. Take your layers out of the freezer 1 1/2 to 2 hours before you plan on decorating and let them thaw on the counter with the plastic wrap on. I actually prefer freezing my cakes.
post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweettreat101

Wrap your cakes well in plastic wrap and freeze them it will keep your cakes moist. Refrigerating cakes actually speeds up the process of drying them out. Take your layers out of the freezer 1 1/2 to 2 hours before you plan on decorating and let them thaw on the counter with the plastic wrap on. I actually prefer freezing my cakes.



Thanks sweettreat for your advice. I figured freezing was best after I posted this so I wrapped it well in plastic wrap and put it on top of my cake board. I'm glad you also answered my concern regarding when I should take it out. I figured it would take longer to thaw but I'm glad that I'd be ok with 2 hours.
post #5 of 13
Freezing is great. But I don't thaw before filling and crumb coating. In fact if I thaw in the plastic wrap, I've found condensation can sometimes make my cake wet.

I take the cakes out of the freezer, unwrap and start working with them. It really doesn't take very long for the cake to thaw at all. In fact by the time I've finished the crumb coat it's cold but not frozen solid any more. Crumb coating a cold or frozen cake is so much easier...less stickiness.

I've never had a problem with bulging issues either. But then I use only buttercream...no fondant except for decor. Just another option for you! ;D

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post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by carmijok

Freezing is great. But I don't thaw before filling and crumb coating. In fact if I thaw in the plastic wrap, I've found condensation can sometimes make my cake wet.

I take the cakes out of the freezer, unwrap and start working with them. It really doesn't take very long for the cake to thaw at all. In fact by the time I've finished the crumb coat it's cold but not frozen solid any more. Crumb coating a cold or frozen cake is so much easier...less stickiness.

I've never had a problem with bulging issues either. But then I use only buttercream...no fondant except for decor. Just another option for you! ;D



Carmijok:
I am going to use Sugarshack's shortening based frosting. Do you think that I can use your method with her recipe? I'd like to crumb coat as soon as I can and I do worry about condensation forming on the cake. I do have to level it and torte it though. I don't know if torting a cake is difficult when frozen. I should have done that but it was so late and I had finals at school too so I was exhausted.

I do like your suggestion though.
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by ibeeflower

Quote:
Originally Posted by carmijok

Freezing is great. But I don't thaw before filling and crumb coating. In fact if I thaw in the plastic wrap, I've found condensation can sometimes make my cake wet.

I take the cakes out of the freezer, unwrap and start working with them. It really doesn't take very long for the cake to thaw at all. In fact by the time I've finished the crumb coat it's cold but not frozen solid any more. Crumb coating a cold or frozen cake is so much easier...less stickiness.

I've never had a problem with bulging issues either. But then I use only buttercream...no fondant except for decor. Just another option for you! ;D



Carmijok:
I am going to use Sugarshack's shortening based frosting. Do you think that I can use your method with her recipe? I'd like to crumb coat as soon as I can and I do worry about condensation forming on the cake. I do have to level it and torte it though. I don't know if torting a cake is difficult when frozen. I should have done that but it was so late and I had finals at school too so I was exhausted.

I do like your suggestion though.



Actually I find it easier to torte when the cake is cold. I use a serrated knife to do it.
I only use real butter BC so I can't speak for a shortening based one. I can't imagine there would be any problem with it though.

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post #8 of 13
If I plan to cover the cake with fondant can I still fill and carve the cake while frozen and then just let it thaw before covering?
mary
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mary
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post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cakeonista

If I plan to cover the cake with fondant can I still fill and carve the cake while frozen and then just let it thaw before covering?



I never cover with fondant so I can't say definitively yes or no...but I wouldn't think it would make a difference at that point. If it's thawed it would be no different than any other room temp cake. IMO!

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post #10 of 13
Cakeonista, I did a cake this way the other day, and it worked just fine. Well, actually, I crumb-coated the cake in ganache. A whol lot of condensation formed on the ganache as the cake thawed, but I wiped it down with a paper towel or two and it was just moist enough to get the fondant to stick. I didn't put the fondant on until the cake was totally thawed though, so that no more condensation would form on the fondant. I'll certainly be trying this again in the future.
Marianna
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post #11 of 13
My two cents:

I freeze. If I need the cake within 24 hours I refrigerate.

Condensation has been a huge problem for me, as the cakes thaw, creating soupy butter cream. (I live in a very humid area near the ocean) I try to ice the cakes and the butter cream won't stick to the sides of the cake because of condensation.

I found that if I take my frozen layers which have been wrapped in plastic wrap and put them in the fridge over night, they are just right to work with the next day. They are chilled, and I don't have a problem with condensation hence...no sweaty butter cream.

Hope this helps...
post #12 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tokazodo

My two cents:

I freeze. If I need the cake within 24 hours I refrigerate.

Condensation has been a huge problem for me, as the cakes thaw, creating soupy butter cream. (I live in a very humid area near the ocean) I try to ice the cakes and the butter cream won't stick to the sides of the cake because of condensation.

I found that if I take my frozen layers which have been wrapped in plastic wrap and put them in the fridge over night, they are just right to work with the next day. They are chilled, and I don't have a problem with condensation hence...no sweaty butter cream.

Hope this helps...



It is very humid here. It's been especially humid this week. I can't walk from my car to the office door without perspiring (and I'm not exaggerating or walk very far)

I'll have to experiment to figure out if humidity will be an issue for me.
post #13 of 13
I personally don't like frosting a frozen cake. I tried it a couple of times and as the cake thawed the frosting started sliding down the side of the cake plus the condensation. If you use a crusting butter cream you won't be able to smooth with a paper towel until the cake has completely thawed and there is no condensation on the frosting. I use the Wilton icing tip to frost my cakes.
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