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Interns - Page 2

post #16 of 18
Some interns/externs through culinary school are "hired" and paid wages but many of them are brought into a company on an unpaid basis until their hours are completed, then the company may or may not hire them. Obviously, some students prefer a paid internship because we all have bills to pay, haha, but there are definitely a large number of unpaid interns, too.

If you participate in the school's internship program, you are NOT under any obligation to hire them after the internship is over. Also, in some states, the worker's comp coverage is the responsibility of the school-not the company that accepts the unpaid intern. Of course, if you actually hire them as an employee and pay wages, then you would want to protect yourself with worker's comp coverage.

There is so much more involved in labor law that you'll want to educate yourself about before hiring an employee. Things as simple as minimum wage posters, OSHA/safety requirements, hiring documents, etc. There are classes you can take at probably any community college near you or resources available through SCORE that will help make sure you get started on the right foot. Sometimes people ignore all of these "little" details and it only takes one angry "ex" employee to ruin your business.
post #17 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PumpkinTart

Some interns/externs through culinary school are "hired" and paid wages but many of them are brought into a company on an unpaid basis until their hours are completed, then the company may or may not hire them. Obviously, some students prefer a paid internship because we all have bills to pay, haha, but there are definitely a large number of unpaid interns, too.

If you participate in the school's internship program, you are NOT under any obligation to hire them after the internship is over. Also, in some states, the worker's comp coverage is the responsibility of the school-not the company that accepts the unpaid intern. Of course, if you actually hire them as an employee and pay wages, then you would want to protect yourself with worker's comp coverage.

There is so much more involved in labor law that you'll want to educate yourself about before hiring an employee. Things as simple as minimum wage posters, OSHA/safety requirements, hiring documents, etc. There are classes you can take at probably any community college near you or resources available through SCORE that will help make sure you get started on the right foot. Sometimes people ignore all of these "little" details and it only takes one angry "ex" employee to ruin your business.



Yeah. Thanks. I'm nervous about this because its one thing for us to work together, but its another if we grow quickly (and there is a good chance of that, from what I'm seeing) which means we may be thrown into this next realm of hiring, which intimidates me....but we'll make it!
post #18 of 18
For employees:

I owned a construction company with 23 men as employees. Boy, was that an experience. The boss was a 5' 1" woman with a contractors license. Not a great combination. I had to make sure all bases were covered because not only was the job hazardous, but I had issues with drugs, stealing, poor work when an employee got burned out, and many other issues inherent to the construction industry.

I made sure I had detailed meetings with the labor board to understand proper warnings and reprimand, plus the big one... firing. A clear knowledge of unemployment from the unemployment office is the next stop. Make sure you are clear on proper procedure.

Post all relevant posters and notices.

Other must-see sources are an employment attorney, an accountant, and a long read on the irs.gov site.

An insurance agent will apprise you of workers comp coverage, both required and optional.

Decide on employee codes and policies. This week a friend who owns a store was asked by her employee if he could dye his hair blue because she didn't have an appearance policy. She does now.
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