Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cake Decorating › Cooked Sugar Syrup BC Recipe Question
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Cooked Sugar Syrup BC Recipe Question

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I did a test run last night on the Newclassic buttercream recipe found in the "Cake Bible." I had a problem and I hope someone can help. The recipe consists of beating egg yolks until light in color. While you are doing that you are supposed to cook sugar and corn syrup together until it comes to a rolling boil, and then dump the sugar mixture in a greased measuring cup. The directions said to incorporate the sugar mixture into the eggs a little at a time by stopping the mixer, pouring some in and then mixing on high for five seconds. The fist addition of sugar syrup to the eggs was fine. When I tried the second addition, the syrup was like taffy and wouldn't pour from the cup. I spooned some in and it was like a rock in my mixer bowl. This all happened within 30 seconds of removing the syrup from the heat. What happened?

The directions said since you are using corn syrup, the boiling stage is the correct "soft ball" stage so I didn't think I could cook it to long.

I continued to stir after the sugar began to boil. Was this the problem?

I used light corn syrup. The recipe did not specify which to use.

Also I wondered about the safety of this recipe. If I had been able to mix the sugar in correctly, do you think this would have been enough heat to make the frosting safe? I finished making it despite my sugar issues and it was really tasty.

Thanks,
Dena
post #2 of 12
It sounds like you cooked it too much. You essentially made lollipops.

Don't stir after it boils.

Light corn syrup sounds right. Usually use light unless it says otherwise. You could go to the back of the book, I think she's got a list of terms there.
post #3 of 12
DID YOU TEMPER THE EGG MIXTURE?
post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 
What does temper the eggs mean?
post #5 of 12
WHAT THIS MEANS IS THIS. ANYTIME YOU HAVE TO ADD HOT LIQUID TO EGGS IT HAS TO BE TEMPERED. THIS MEANS THAT YOU TAKE A LITTLE OF THE HOT LIQUID AND ADD IT TO THE EGGS THEN STIR THE EGGS. THIS BRINGS THE EGGS UP TO TEMPERATURE WITH THE HOT LIQUID AND KEEPS THEM FROM SCRAMBLING. AFTER YOU DO THIS YOU CAN THEN ADD THE REST OF THE HOT LIQUID TO THEM. YOU HAVE TO BE CAREFUL ANYTIME YOU ARE ADDING HOT LIQUID TO EGGS. ADD IT ALL AT ONCE WITHOUT TEMPERING AND THEY SCRAMBLE.


AND SANGRIA IS RIGHT. AFTER IT BOILS DO NOT STIR IT.
post #6 of 12
Hi dparrish..when I have made this recipe I had some problems also. One thing I've noticed is if you pour the syrup into the eggs while the mixer is going, the air from the beater cools the syrup too quickly. Try stopping your mixer, or even using a pouring shield (you can make your own with a paper plate). Another thing that I do is warm my mearuring cup with hot water and dry thorughly. This helps the syrup to not set up as quicky. Hope this helps.
post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 
I guess I did try to temper my eggs until my syrup turned into a lollipop!
I was turning my mixer off before the addition of syrup. But that is a great idea to heat the measuring cup.

The sugar mixture is 1/2c. corn syrup and 1/4c. of sugar. I live in north central Kansas. It is kind of humid here.

Thanks for your advice. I will have to try making this again!
post #8 of 12
I tried making the whimsical bakehouse cooked BC recipe and I had similar problems. I followed the directions to a "T" but when it came time to pour the sugar syrup into the egg whites, the sugar started to crystalize immediately after taking it off the heat. I couldn't get all the syrup mixture in the recipe and it ended up tasting like butter frosting icon_sad.gif
post #9 of 12
We've had a discussion before about whether the temperature of the syrup is hot enough to bring the eggs to a safe temperature. The consensus seemd to be that it isn't. You are making the syrup not to rasie the temperature of the eggs, but to control the consistency of the icing.

I use the recipe for Mousseline buttercream which is also in The Cake Bible. It calls for egg whites instead of yolks, so I can use pasteurized dried whites which are safe. Also, the recipe uses a candy thermometer so you have more control about the sugar syrup temperature, though if you cook it past the stated temperature you can still get taffy. Most likely, if you left the syrup on the stove after it came to a boil, it continued to cook and the temperature did rise. Notice the recipe says to remove fro heat and pour into the glass measuring cup as soon as you hit a rolling boil.

While it is usually important to temper eggs before adding anything hot, in the case of icing, I'm not so sure. However, since you are adding the syrup slowly, it is almost the same thing.

And before others chime in and we start this same battle all over again... Yes, I know using dried egg whites probably produces an icing that is not as stupendously wonderful as one produced using fresh egg whites. However, as I don't know any chickens personally, I have made the choice to safe instead of sorry and sacrifice the freshness of the eggs. You are perfectly welcome to make your own decision. Only, please let's not argue about it again, OK? icon_smile.gif
post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
itsacake - you are so funny! I must have missed out on that discussion.

I do know some chickens.. my mother in law has chickens and gives me eggs. Sometimes I don't wash them, yuk I know. (I live on a farm so stuff like that doesn't bother me) I should probably say that I do not use them when I make cakes because they are not uniform in size and I would wash them if I did. I have been to a commercial egg farm and they collect the eggs right away and wash them really well at high temperatures. Way better than anyone could ever do at home. After going to the egg farm, and seeing the cleaning process I would rather use the store bought eggs because I know they didn't sit outside for who knows how long and they are clean.


Thanks for the tip on the Mousseline buttercream. I want to experiment with the dried egg whites also. Is that the same as meringue powder?
post #11 of 12
I have been buying dried egg white powder at Whole Foods. They have two brands: Deb-el and Bob's Red Mill and I've used both.

I think you can find dried egg white powder at any health food store and at many large grocery stores as well. It is almost the same as Meringue powder, but the meringue powder has sugar and other additives so I prefer this product. I don't use the Wilton buttercream recipe which uses meringue powder, so I don't keep it on hand. I wouldn't hesitate to experiment with using meringue powder for this kind of icing, because I think it should work, but I'd leave time to do it over again in case I was wrong and I'd do it for the first time with a small batch.

Also, if you di decide to use dried egg powder, remember to dissolve it by stirring in warmish water for quite a while before you actually beat it, otherwise, you can get icky (the techncal term) lumps. If you have a KA, you can leave it on the lowest speed with the balloon whip attached but not "clicked in" so it hangs a bit lower and just let it go for a few minutes. When you come back to it, most of the powder will have dissoved and you can squish any other lumps that are left between the side of the bowl and the bottom of a spoon.

Good Luck!
post #12 of 12
dparrish, oh my goodness, I just got hooked on the fresh eggs as well. They just don't compare to anything!!!! I can see why Martha has her own chicken coop.

Well, speaking of farms, my rabbit just decided she is going to hang out ON the couch. I don't think so! icon_lol.gif

Gotta run!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cake Decorating
Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cake Decorating › Cooked Sugar Syrup BC Recipe Question