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wedding cakes and cake texture

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Those who bake from scratch....for wedding cakes do you use only dense cakes to make them sturdier or does it really matter? Someone suggested to me I should be using pound cakes? Any input? I've done small two tier wedding cakes and just used any old recipe I had. Those cakes were fine. Now I'm wondering about larger 3 tiered cakes. I have one due in a couple months. If I use proper dowel supports, shouldn't that provide the cake with enough support? Or do I need a sturdy cake recipe? Please tell me what all of you think?
post #2 of 15
I use butter cakes and the SPS support system. I have never had a wedding cake collapse, knock wood.
Fall down 7 times....get up 8
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Fall down 7 times....get up 8
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post #3 of 15
I really don't see what it would matter what type of cake you used as long as you have proper support. The cake doesn't hold the tier above it, the supports do.
post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 
That's what I was thinking....the supports are what is important. Someone told me though that especially fondant covered cakes, need to be a dense cake that is sturdy enough to support the fondant....I don't know. I tend to agree with both of you though. I'd like to hear if anyone else has a differing opinion though...
post #5 of 15
Truely, you can use any kind of cake recipe for a tiered cake if you use the correct supports. I made a three tiered cake of cheesecake based on Rose Levy's Cake Bible. I use SPS system only because I have to transport cakes over bumping country roads but I suspect that bubble straws would work as well.
No license or insurance. Put lead wires in cakes, never wash hands, cake boards are used cardboard. No contracts cause I can't read or write. No lawyer cause I'm judgment proof. I bake with old mix boxes found behind Walmart. Now about my question
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No license or insurance. Put lead wires in cakes, never wash hands, cake boards are used cardboard. No contracts cause I can't read or write. No lawyer cause I'm judgment proof. I bake with old mix boxes found behind Walmart. Now about my question
Reply
post #6 of 15
The supports is what will make the cake stay upright (thanks to the SPS system, i have had a middle tier crack which would have led to a collapse if it weren't for the independently supported SPS plate.)

I think the benefit of using a pound or sturdy cake for a wedding cake is that it will hold up better when cut. A lighter, more fragile cake may be a bit of a mess when being sliced into the precise 1" x 2" wedding cake slices. Where a delicate cake may be lovely cut in wedges and served, it could fall apart upon cake cutting.
post #7 of 15
So, I'm just wondering what the SPS system is? I just use wooden dowels icon_razz.gif
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by cupncake1

So, I'm just wondering what the SPS system is? I just use wooden dowels icon_razz.gif



In a nutshell, the SPS system means Single Plate System by Baker's Craft is a wonderful method to insure that your tiered cake won't topple. Each tier sits on a rigid plastic plate with pillars which securely attach to the bottom of the plate. The pillars serve the same purpose as the wooden dowels that you use...they are pushed into the bottom tier. BC's SPS is extremely well made and offer incredible stability so that there's no shaking or shimmering. There's plenty of posts on CC extolling the joys of SPS. I've made a 5 tiered cake with them and never have any worry about toppling. I've transported a completely assembled three tiered cake over country dirt roads with no shifting of the cakes or any dreaded ripping through the cake.
No license or insurance. Put lead wires in cakes, never wash hands, cake boards are used cardboard. No contracts cause I can't read or write. No lawyer cause I'm judgment proof. I bake with old mix boxes found behind Walmart. Now about my question
Reply
No license or insurance. Put lead wires in cakes, never wash hands, cake boards are used cardboard. No contracts cause I can't read or write. No lawyer cause I'm judgment proof. I bake with old mix boxes found behind Walmart. Now about my question
Reply
post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 
I may have to look into this SPS system, I'm always worried about my cake toppling over! I've always used dowels and it's worked so far. Is the SPS system expensive?
post #10 of 15
SPS is more expensive than bubble straws or wooden dowels but considering the peace of mind, it's worth it. Because I bake in a very small town where we know each other, it seems like all my customers send the plates and the pillars back to me when they return the platter. I've just run them through the dishwasher and reused them. My cakes are usually 4" tall and I've even reused the pillars that have been cut to size before.
No license or insurance. Put lead wires in cakes, never wash hands, cake boards are used cardboard. No contracts cause I can't read or write. No lawyer cause I'm judgment proof. I bake with old mix boxes found behind Walmart. Now about my question
Reply
No license or insurance. Put lead wires in cakes, never wash hands, cake boards are used cardboard. No contracts cause I can't read or write. No lawyer cause I'm judgment proof. I bake with old mix boxes found behind Walmart. Now about my question
Reply
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by HannahsMomi

That's what I was thinking....the supports are what is important. Someone told me though that especially fondant covered cakes, need to be a dense cake that is sturdy enough to support the fondant....I don't know. I tend to agree with both of you though. I'd like to hear if anyone else has a differing opinion though...



If the fondant is enough to collapse the cake, then it's way too thick. The weight of the fondant will be dispersed over the area of the cake so it shouldn't matter if it's not an extremely dense recipe. The cake beneath should already be smoothed enough that you don't need a thick layer to cover imperfections.
post #12 of 15
SPS = Single Plate Separators (a disposable system by Bakery Crafts):
https://www.bakerycrafts.com/ItemSearchResults.aspx?SrchStr=sps

SPS instructions (a "sticky" by leah_s):
http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-603925.html
post #13 of 15
Here's a youtube instructional that I used when I did my first wedding cake. This is a great visual.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=74k0ZopsCW8&feature=mfu_in_order&list=UL
post #14 of 15
I agree with lorieleann.

I offer every cake as a wedding cake and I warn people that some are harder to cut. If I use buttercream, it is easier, but fondant, and the pressure to cut it can slightly smash a more delicate cake.

I'm learning as I go. If it is my most popular Bailey's cake, I know to have it slightly cold when cutting. I suggest that they cut the cake with the bride and groom, then have them dance, etc., giving me or someone in the wedding party a chance to cut the cake, put it on plates, and arrange the plates. That 20 or 30 minutes is enough to bring the slice to room temp.

If someone wants a particular scratch cake, I have found that they will adjust their schedule around the needs of the cake. I make sure I discuss all of the needs of a particular flavor when we are planning.

I agree with everyone about the supports.
post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 
so....would a 3 tiered (6, 8, 10) buttercream cake with sugar flowers survive a 1 1/2 hour trip down the interstate if stacked with the SPS system?
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