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Amount of layers and servings

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
I've been searching everywhere to see if I could find some sort of chart that would tell me what the serving size becomes as you add layers. I know for a fact that you can get more servings out of a 4 layer 8 inch cake versus a 2 layer. I did a four layer tall 8-inch for my son's birthday and we fed 26 people with 1/3 of the cake left over. However, this information seems to be nowhere. Everything is based on a 2 layer cake.

I'm trying to feed 40-50 people using a tall 10 inch round cake. Was thinking four layers might do it if the cake is cut properly. Otherwise I'd have to do a 2 layer 12 inch, but that won't give the customer the height. And I really, really REALLY don't want to add a third layer to the 12 inch.

Any advice? Or links with charts you could send me to?

Thanks!
post #2 of 11
Well... the wilton chart (I think) is based on TWO 2" Layers. So if you usually do FOUR 1" layers then that is the same amount of servings. Maybe a few more because of more filling.

If you usually do FOUR 2" layers then that will be double the servings.

HTH
Started my business legally February 2012! Commercial kitchen and all!
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Started my business legally February 2012! Commercial kitchen and all!
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post #3 of 11
Hi i have a chart kindly put on cc by another user i have tried to add an attachment hope it works and that it helps you
LL
post #4 of 11
When you add an additional layer to a two-layer cake, it's 50% more.
When you add an additional two layers to a two-layer cake, it's 100% more.

You could potentially get more servings, but it depends on how you construct it and how it's cut. Since a layer is typically 2" tall, four layers (8" tall) with a cake circle in between at 4" would serve double the industry standard because it's being sliced as two separate two-layer cakes. If there's no board in the middle and it's being sliced as one extra tall layer cake, it wouldn't yield any additional servings if it's cut following the same pattern of cutting.
http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm
post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by gingerlycreative

I've been searching everywhere to see if I could find some sort of chart that would tell me what the serving size becomes as you add layers. I know for a fact that you can get more servings out of a 4 layer 8 inch cake versus a 2 layer. I did a four layer tall 8-inch for my son's birthday and we fed 26 people with 1/3 of the cake left over. However, this information seems to be nowhere. Everything is based on a 2 layer cake.

I'm trying to feed 40-50 people using a tall 10 inch round cake. Was thinking four layers might do it if the cake is cut properly. Otherwise I'd have to do a 2 layer 12 inch, but that won't give the customer the height. And I really, really REALLY don't want to add a third layer to the 12 inch.

Any advice? Or links with charts you could send me to?



Are you trying to make an 8" tall cake WITHOUT dowels in the bottom 4", and a cardboard circle under the top 4"? That is asking for disaster IMHO. There is a reason that "everything is based on a 2 layer cake". Cakes over 4" (6" MAX) are not generally made because they would be too unstable. The method for making "tall" cakes or carved cakes over 6" tall is to create a tier (typically 4" high made of two 2" layers), then put in dowels, then put the second tier (which is on a cardboard circle) on top of the dowelled bottom tier, and so on until you get the height needed. Tall cake structures need to be dowelled like crazy!

If you are stacking two tiers (dowelled and supported with cardboard circle), all you have to do is some math. If you are putting a cardboard cake circle between each 4" of cake (two, 2" thick layers), to create an 8" high cake: Refer to the Wilton Wedding Chart for wedding size servings for a 4" high tier, then double it.

You would cut from the top down to the cardboard circle that is sitting on the dowels. Once all the cake on that tier is gone, remove the cake circle and pull out the dowels, and serve the same number of servings from the bottom tier.
post #6 of 11
I'm pretty sure you are meaning an 8" round cake, not a 8" tall? A standard serving size is 8 cubic inches for wedding cakes, which is 1" x 2" x 4" high. Party sizes are usually considered double that: 2" x 2" x 4", though sometimes a two layer cake is considered a party cake and then the cut size of 2" x 2"x 2" is also 8 cubic.

This is a great cutting guide for those sizes: (also check out the rectangle and square guides by the same user)

http://cakecentral.com/gallery/1300478/round-cake-cutting-and-serving-guide


good luck!
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by lorieleann

Party sizes are usually considered double that: 2" x 2" x 4", though sometimes a two layer cake is considered a party cake and then the cut size of 2" x 2"x 2" is also 8 cubic.



Party sizes are usually 50% larger (12 cu. in.), not 100% larger (16 cu. in.).
1.5 x 2 x 4 = 12 cubic inches.
http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-party-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

You don't get 2x2x2 cuts from two-layer cakes (they're 4" tall), that's how single-layer cakes are cut.
post #8 of 11
lorieleann~~ Thanks for providing the link (and thanks to the person who made the guide!) I'm bookmarking this because I use the Indydebi method of cutting for my cakes.
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWR41

Quote:
Originally Posted by lorieleann

Party sizes are usually considered double that: 2" x 2" x 4", though sometimes a two layer cake is considered a party cake and then the cut size of 2" x 2"x 2" is also 8 cubic.



Party sizes are usually 50% larger (12 cu. in.), not 100% larger (16 cu. in.).
1.5 x 2 x 4 = 12 cubic inches.
http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-party-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

You don't get 2x2x2 cuts from two-layer cakes (they're 4" tall), that's how single-layer cakes are cut.



D'oh! i knew that icon_redface.gif about what equals 8"

Though it may not be usual practice, I do however like to quote the range of servings of 2x2 (party) to 1x2 (wedding) on my party cakes (which are 4-5" tall). Wedding and 'three or more' tier event cakes are quoted by serving on the 1 x 2 wilton chart.
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWR41

Quote:
Originally Posted by lorieleann

Party sizes are usually considered double that: 2" x 2" x 4", though sometimes a two layer cake is considered a party cake and then the cut size of 2" x 2"x 2" is also 8 cubic.



Party sizes are usually 50% larger (12 cu. in.), not 100% larger (16 cu. in.).
1.5 x 2 x 4 = 12 cubic inches.
http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-party-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

You don't get 2x2x2 cuts from two-layer cakes (they're 4" tall), that's how single-layer cakes are cut.



D'oh! i knew that icon_redface.gif about what equals 8"

Though it may not be usual practice, I do however like to quote the range of servings of 2x2 (party) to 1x2 (wedding) on my party cakes (which are 4-5" tall). Wedding and 'three or more' tier event cakes are quoted by serving on the 1 x 2 wilton chart.
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWR41

Quote:
Originally Posted by lorieleann

Party sizes are usually considered double that: 2" x 2" x 4", though sometimes a two layer cake is considered a party cake and then the cut size of 2" x 2"x 2" is also 8 cubic.



Party sizes are usually 50% larger (12 cu. in.), not 100% larger (16 cu. in.).
1.5 x 2 x 4 = 12 cubic inches.
http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-party-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

You don't get 2x2x2 cuts from two-layer cakes (they're 4" tall), that's how single-layer cakes are cut.



D'oh! i knew that icon_redface.gif about what equals 8"

Though it may not be usual practice, I do however like to quote the range of servings of 2x2 (party) to 1x2 (wedding) on my party cakes (which are 4-5" tall). Wedding and 'three or more' tier event cakes are quoted by serving on the 1 x 2 wilton chart.
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