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California cottage food act introduced in state assembly - Page 10

post #136 of 145
cakenewbe: There are some helpful sites on facebook regarding the new law and questions about it. One is Cottage Food Law-supporters of AB1616. If you facebook search Cal cottage law, they should show up.
Lisa

To see more pix visit facebook: Gingerbread On The Go
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Lisa

To see more pix visit facebook: Gingerbread On The Go
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post #137 of 145
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakenewbe

I do have a question though. Since it stipulates that you can not use cream or custard fillings. Does that include things like SMBC or IMBC? Does that include pastry cream too? And would you (we) be telling customers that you can not use those?



Here's where some education will help you. That's what those food safe courses are for.

So this is how you have to think under this law:

SBMC and IBMC are made from butter and meringue. Did you see those on the forbidden list?

Fruit curds are made from fruit juice, eggs, butter, sugar, water, starch. Are those limited?
OOPS--can you skip the egg part of the fruit curd for compliance? Jason, please?

"without cream, custard" theoretically includes pastry cream, pudding, cream cheese, ganache, whipped cream, and icings/frostings made with cream or cream cheese or custard.
Is custard defined as milk/cream cooked with starch and/or egg? Jason?

You MUST refuse to provide such components of baked goods to customers simply saying "state law regulations, sorry". People generally accept the concern for their safety.

Now what does this list allow for cake decorators? Jason you're the expert.

Let me illustrate one legal example that does not involve more than a minimum of chemicals. Instant pudding mix may be milk-free (check label). If so then you can blend 1 pack pudding mix and 1 cup water and whip that stiff mass into 1 cup shortening with 1 cup sugar to make a "whipped frosting" that complies with the law.With real vanilla or other extracts, it tastes a whole lot better than the commercial stuff that has titanium dioxide and only artificial flavours.
post #138 of 145
Someone started a FB group for people to specifically discuss getting your CA food business started: https://www.facebook.com/groups/Creatingyourcaliforniacottagefoodbusiness/

It's kind of a mess, since there are a lot of specifics still be decided with regards to the law, and a lot of these people don't have the first clue about how to start or run a business.
post #139 of 145
Thread Starter 
Regarding which cream fillings will be allowed, it isn't clear whether ultimate authority for determining this lies with the state public health office or local county health depts...the former is in charge of maintaining the list of allowed items (which is a little vague at this point), but the latter has been tasked with enforcement.

The way this usually works is that anything requiring refrigeration is generally not allowed, but to be sure you can have a product tested to determine acidity and water activity to tell you whether or not it is "potentially hazardous" (meaning at risk for growth of bacteria). There are companies that specialize in this testing, one is Food Safety Net, they have labs in LA and Fresno. http://www.food-safetynet.com/
post #140 of 145
Filling options seem to be pretty limited.
post #141 of 145
I just found out that Gov. Brown signed this one tonight. Like others I totally thought this was a long shot! I'm THRILLED! I see more of my profits go down the drain in kitchen fees! It will be wonderful not to have to lug my stuff all the time too!

As for the "perishables"...I don't use them. I saw someone added ganache to the list but that is shelf stable so it, along with the fondant and buttercream recipes I use, are just fine at room temp and I don't refrigerate them. I don't use creams and such that have to be refrigerated because I believe it dries out the cake.

I'm over the moon!!!

Cat
post #142 of 145
I have a simple questions: What defines a "private home" ? Is a townhome owned privately a private home?
Thanks!
post #143 of 145
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetestthing09

I have a simple questions: What defines a "private home" ? Is a townhome owned privately a private home?
Thanks!


Section 113758(b)(6):
âPrivate homeâ means a dwelling, including an apartment or other leased space, where individuals reside.

http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=201120120AB1616

So a townhouse would be fine, as would a rented apartment. If you have an HOA you would need to check the bylaws though, as some HOAs have restrictions on home-based businesses.
post #144 of 145
Thread Starter 
The Sustainable Economies Law Center (one of the organizations responsible for pushing through AB1616) posted a FAQ on their web site for questions about the new law.

http://www.theselc.org/faq/
post #145 of 145

I'm excited to see that Orange County already has information available online AND for my needs, it looks like I will need a permit, but not an inspection, which pleases me, because they just make me nervous! I'm so so happy that my dreams to have a functioning bakery didn't die with the economy in 2008! I'm working on my new business plan!

 

jen

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