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Question over Duff Goldman fondant

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I would like to know if anyone has tried Duff's fondant. Does it have avoid flavor and does anyone recommend it? I would like to know if it tastes the same as Wilton ?
post #2 of 18
Duff's fondant is way better than Wilton, I highly recommend it! The only other brand that I buy is Choco Pan, in my personal opinion these the the two best tasting fondants out there.
post #3 of 18
ive used it quite a bit. espcially when i need black. its very expensive but with the joannes/micheals 40% coupons its not too bad
it does IMO taste better than wilton. i use wilton only to cover my boards or decorations. never to cover a cake.
i read somewhere ??maybe here?? that duff is a form of stain ice or maybe from the same company.
i also noticed that wilton is def easier to roll out than duffs. duffs is very hard even when i soften it.
i like using duff because it holds the color better than wilton.
HTH
Wilton Method Instructor. If you're lucky enough to be on a beach...you're lucky enough.
DANCE as though no one is watching you, LOVE as though you have never been hurt before, SING as though no one can hear you, LIVE as though heaven is on earth...souza
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Wilton Method Instructor. If you're lucky enough to be on a beach...you're lucky enough.
DANCE as though no one is watching you, LOVE as though you have never been hurt before, SING as though no one can hear you, LIVE as though heaven is on earth...souza
Reply
post #4 of 18
I found it very greasy and a little hard to roll out.
post #5 of 18
I've used the red, and the only thing I don't like about it is that it doesn't dry well. I've had it sit for weeks after cutting out shapes and it would still be pliable. It can sit out for weeks and not dry like other fondant, but it does retain the red color much better than other fondants.
post #6 of 18
Duff is difficult to work with. A little too pilable.I like mixing it 50/50 with wilton
post #7 of 18
Duff's fondant is Fondarific under a different label. It's a candy melt based fondant, acting more like modeling chocolate, with a lot more fat than any other fondant than Choco Pan.

It needs to be nuked, per the instructions on the container, for a few SECONDS to be made pliable. If you over do it, or overwork it when kneading it/rolling it, throw it in the fridge for a minute.

It doesn't dry like regular fondant, nor can you add gums to it to make "gum paste" or to get it to dry quickly/better. The fats make it somewhat less stable in heat.

I love it for certain applications and can't use it for others. Like everything, it has it's place.

Rae
I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
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I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
Reply
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

Duff's fondant is Fondarific under a different label. It's a candy melt based fondant, acting more like modeling chocolate, with a lot more fat than any other fondant than Choco Pan.

It needs to be nuked, per the instructions on the container, for a few SECONDS to be made pliable. If you over do it, or overwork it when kneading it/rolling it, throw it in the fridge for a minute.

It doesn't dry like regular fondant, nor can you add gums to it to make "gum paste" or to get it to dry quickly/better. The fats make it somewhat less stable in heat.

I love it for certain applications and can't use it for others. Like everything, it has it's place.

Rae



First time I've seen that, thanks! I don't use it but that is very useful info about what type of fondant it is!
post #9 of 18
I used it Duff (Black) with tylose added with my last cake to make all the fondant decorations. I needed to add a couple of drops of super black because the tylose changed the color just a bit. I was pleased with the outcome.
post #10 of 18
When the weather is warmer, you may find that the tylose isn't what really helped it "firm up". The cool weather helps it firm up naturally.

In warmer weather, I've known people to add teaspoon after teaspoon of tylose/cmc/gum tex, and it was just a waste of money.

It's really designed to stay pliable.

Rae
I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
Reply
I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
Reply
post #11 of 18
Thanks BlakesCakes. I'll remember that. Tylose is what I had at the time.
post #12 of 18
If you watch his shows he will suggest for beginners using fondant to cover a cake to use the Fondarific brand. That it doesnt dry fast like the others and you have alot of time to work with it.
I think it tastes great!
post #13 of 18
The chocolate tastes like a Tootsie Roll-delicious!!
post #14 of 18
I,ve used tylose in both red and black, it never hardened up to make flowers. I was so dissappointed. I,ve use it as is for small deco's . Liked it that way. The red and black both smell and taste good.Haven,t used it to cover cakes.
post #15 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thank you for the information and opinion.
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