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modeling chocolate - Page 2

post #16 of 48
my instructor said you could flavor it just like you would with the candy melts. kids like it, its sugar. its nothing amazing taste wise.
post #17 of 48
Thread Starter 
kkurek, i would love the instructions as well! you do beatiful work, and a very much appreciate all the information. lsmitke@gmail.com thank you so much
You Imagine It... I Create It... It's a PEACE of cake!
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You Imagine It... I Create It... It's a PEACE of cake!
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post #18 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by kkurek

my instructor said you could flavor it just like you would with the candy melts. kids like it, its sugar. its nothing amazing taste wise.



Can you make it amazing, taste wise? (I've only used the peppermint and wintergreen Wilton candy flavors for my Guittard A'Peels' chocolate so far, and it was wonderful.
post #19 of 48
I havent experimented with flavors yet. I only took this class about a month ago, so most of the technical stuff is still nice and fresh in my mind.

I would assume that if the candy melts flavor good when used for candy making or whatever else then the modeling chocolate would too.

I would maybe think it could change the consistency a little. So youll just have to experiment with it. Maybe ease up on the glucose or corn syrup,
post #20 of 48
The book Cake Art from the Culinary Institute of America has a recipe that I've used. If I recall correctly, the ratio is 1 lb of chocolate (real chocolate) or 1 1/2 lbs of white chocolate and 1 cup of corn syrup. I didn't try covering a cake with it, but it did taste nice. The texture was reminiscent of a tootsie roll, but it tasted like real chocolate (which was just el-cheapo Baker's semi-sweet) so if you used a fantastic tasting chocolate, I bet it would be even better. I'm definitely going to try it again with the mint flavoring, what a great idea!

As far as texture or ease of use, it was a little tricky to use, melting quite easily and remaining fairly soft when set. Never tried any other recipe, so I have nothing to compare it to and thought this was just the way modeling chocolate was. So would using glucose instead of corn syrup stiffen it up better?

My flowers aren't a patch on the gorgeous things y'all have posted, but I was still proud of them.
post #21 of 48
kkurek--I apologize, I may not have sent you a PM (private message). I've been watching my niece and nephew and had to step away suddenly a few times. I'll send another PM with my email. I'd be so grateful for copies of your instructions and notes.

happyascanbee~~Those were beautiful. Thanks for posting.
post #22 of 48
I'll get flamed for this, but I'm gonna say it anyway:

If you've paid to take a class, sharing some info is wonderful, but it is patently unfair to the instructor--AND TO YOU--to share detailed notes or the instructor's handouts. Please consider this when giving out information.
You devalue your own paid tuition to the class and you devalue the time and effort put in by the instructor when to produce the class and any handouts you've received.

I've taken a class with Jing Palasigue at an ICES Day of Sharing here in OH (he's doing the class at Wilton in Chicago). He's a wonderful instructor and the one who got me using glucose vs. corn syrup in my modeling chocolate. I think it makes a marvelous difference.

Rae
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They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
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I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
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post #23 of 48
i'm going to try this! my brother's girlfriend wants a romantic cake for their anniversary and i'm thinking about putting chocolate flowers on there using this modeling chocolate. wish me luck! icon_biggrin.gif
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"If there ever comes a day when we can't be together, keep me in your heart, i'll stay there forever." - Pooh
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post #24 of 48
I use Wiltons Candy melts. They actually taste good.. Don't confuse it with Fondant.. I don't know how else you can change the taste of candy melts ??? extact will ruin the texture and chemistry of the modeling mixture..
post #25 of 48
they have candy flavors, specifically made for the candy melts.
post #26 of 48
Just making sure I understand this right. If you want a certain flavor you just use the flavored candy melts? Or can you add flavoring to the mix? Also what about coloring it? Would it be similar to coloring fondant or gum paste?
post #27 of 48
you color the same as fondant and gumpaste. once the mixture is ready and set over night.

i am not certain about flavoring it. im assuming you can flavor the melts with the candy melts flavors before you mix it with the glucose. something to experiment with.
post #28 of 48

I've just recently started working with modeling chocolate maybe my mixture is wrong or my hands are to hot but I try my best not to handle it to much but after I make something I will set it out on our enclosed patio to cool down as soon as I bring it back in it melts instantly, my mixture 12 oz of wilton white chips and 1/3 cup corn syrup. If someone could help me I would really like to start using it for figures on my cakes.

post #29 of 48

I've made it with the 12 oz bag of Wilton Melts, 1/3 C clear corn syrup recipe. I added gel food coloring & Lorann oil flavoring to the syrup before I stirred it into the melts. Came out with tasty, vibrantly colored modeling clay that was easy to work, held its shape and people actually ate the decorations made with it instead of scraping them to the  side of the plate like they've done with fondant!

 

I also used the recipe I found here on CC for Chocolate Leather. It calls for chocolate bark and clear corn syrup. Tastes just like a Tootsie Roll!

 

One thing I learned is to let the melted mixture set several hours before trying to knead it. I made a huge mess trying to sop up all the watery/oily looking goo before that lesson! OH! and it's a good idea to work over the sinkicon_smile.gif

In my opinion, cake should be at the base of the Food Pyramid.
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In my opinion, cake should be at the base of the Food Pyramid.
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post #30 of 48

Thank you I'll give that a try

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