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How to make crisp edges using fondant??

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
I love fondant...so easy to work with! However, when I cover my cakes in fondant, they tend to have a more rounded look, rather than the crisp edges I prefer. How do you guys get a more crisp look? Could it be that I've rolled the fondant too thick (I feel like I get it thin, but maybe not thin enough)? Do different brands create different results? Help!!
post #2 of 23
Roll your fondant as thin as you can, and if you are using buttercream underneath the fondant, try putting your cake in the freezer long enough ..15minutes .. for the buttercream to harden this will help keep the edges crisp .
Be Kind Anyway
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Be Kind Anyway
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post #3 of 23
post #4 of 23
I am a big fan of ganache under fondant. You can get your edges super square, let the ganache harden, then lay on the fondant.
post #5 of 23
There is no need to spend that much time icing a cake. If you learn alternate methods, you'll never master the correct method. http://tlc.discovery.com/videos/cake-boss-icing-a-cake-buddy-style.html I apologize, there's a commercial, but the 30 seconds you spend on that will save you hours down the road. He used a really light icing, so it went even faster. The video is not quite 3 minutes long and the whole cake gets iced. For a heavier icing the regular cake icing tip is probably preferable.


Your issue is probably icing hardness, just put the cake in the frig first and fondant thickness.
post #6 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by howsweet

There is no need to spend that much time icing a cake. If you learn alternate methods, you'll never master the correct method.



lol.... there are no cake laws which state the 'correct' methods. As long as the result pleases you, then any method that suits you is the correct one.
post #7 of 23
I second the ganache - I just tried it last week...and loved the effect!!
I've learned so much from my mistakes..... I'm thinking of making a few more!
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I've learned so much from my mistakes..... I'm thinking of making a few more!
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post #8 of 23
OP - there is no 'correct' method to ice a cake. If you asked 100 members here how they do it, you'd get 100 different answers.
post #9 of 23
I hope this question doesn't sound stupid, but ganache is chocolate, so what if your cake flavor isn't compatible with chocolate - say, lemon, for instance. Or what if people say they want "birthday cake icing" or "wedding cake flavor icing" (which is usually vanilla, butter, almond)? Also, if you do use ganache, do you use a spreadable or pourable type? Just chocolate and cream, or butter as well?
post #10 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawnybird

I hope this question doesn't sound stupid, but ganache is chocolate, so what if your cake flavor isn't compatible with chocolate - say, lemon, for instance. Or what if people say they want "birthday cake icing" or "wedding cake flavor icing" (which is usually vanilla, butter, almond)? Also, if you do use ganache, do you use a spreadable or pourable type? Just chocolate and cream, or butter as well?



course it's not stupid icon_smile.gif you could always make white chocolate ganache (different ratio of choc to cream, and not quite as firm, but easier to work with as it sets up slower). Then add lemon oil to it.

Try watching Michelle's ganache videos, there are three of them, this is the first. She is very thorough and easy to follow:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qFtm8q4m4Bk
post #11 of 23
ooohhh, lemon white chocolate ganache!?!?
sounds amazing- I hadn't thought that far, since I just started using the ganache!

I use plain ganache, no butter, no whipping, I just made it, let it cool, and crumb coated my cake, stuck it in the fridge, smoothed it with a hot knife (that was where I fell in love), then back in the fridge, then fondant!

However, my next big task is to master smoothing buttercream...that is probably why I fell in love w/ganache- but I have to admit the ganache tasted delish with the fondant- but a batch doesn't go very far on a cake-I'd love to have had a thicker layer....
I've learned so much from my mistakes..... I'm thinking of making a few more!
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I've learned so much from my mistakes..... I'm thinking of making a few more!
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post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Debbye27

but a batch doesn't go very far on a cake-I'd love to have had a thicker layer....



You can use as much as you like! I usually make a batch melting 1.2kg (2.6lb) of chocolate to fill and cover an 8 or 9inch cake.
post #13 of 23
Thread Starter 
I usually stick my cake in the freezer for awhile before covering in fondant but I still end up with rounded edges icon_sad.gif Haven't tried ganache; I've always used BC as my frosting. Wondering how to still achieve the sharp edges without switching from my BC. I'm thinking I'll try and roll it thinner next time and see how it turns out.
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by zespri

Quote:
Originally Posted by howsweet

There is no need to spend that much time icing a cake. If you learn alternate methods, you'll never master the correct method.



lol.... there are no cake laws which state the 'correct' methods. As long as the result pleases you, then any method that suits you is the correct one.

lol... as long as the result pleases you? But it can take about 5 minutes or 30 minutes. I was just thinking most people would want to get it over with. I can't fathom taking the extra time to turn the cake upside down, bother with a hot knife or make templates(???) for icing a cake.
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by howsweet

Quote:
Originally Posted by zespri

Quote:
Originally Posted by howsweet

There is no need to spend that much time icing a cake. If you learn alternate methods, you'll never master the correct method.



lol.... there are no cake laws which state the 'correct' methods. As long as the result pleases you, then any method that suits you is the correct one.

lol... as long as the result pleases you? But it can take about 5 minutes or 30 minutes. I was just thinking most people would want to get it over with. I can't fathom taking the extra time to turn the cake upside down, bother with a hot knife or make templates(???) for icing a cake.



I wasn't saying your method isn't fast for you, obviously it is. Your method is the first one I used when I was starting out, and it's fine. I still do it if I'm not worried about perfect edges.

I was just amused that you felt it was the only valid method, that all others were a waste of time. Each method brings it's own pro's and con's. Using the upside down method (not sure what you mean about templates, unless you mean Sharon Zambito's method?) is actually faster for me. You smear icing on top, so do I. Then I flip upside down (takes make 30 seconds max). You smear icing on the side, so do I. It's really not a huge difference in time actually applying the icing. the time saving comes in getting it looking neat and even. You can do it quick as a wink without even thinking when the cake is upside down with cake boards to guide you.

Neatness isn't important all the time, so in those cases you can skip the steps you want to, and only do the bits that suit you.

Just keep an open mind icon_wink.gif
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