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Looking for a recipe...

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
That will allow me to get that smooth texture and cut that "professional" wedding cakes have. I have been asked to do a few birthday and baby shower cakes and while doctored mixes are great for my kids - I want something a little more formal..

Thanks!
post #2 of 12
In order to get the smooth look you will need to use a nice buttercream that has the consistency of mayonnaise. I like swiss buttercream.

Check out http://www.youtube.com/user/tonedna1

She has a nice beginners tutorial on how to ice cakes.
post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
thanks for the suggestion on the buttercream! But what about a cake recipe?
post #4 of 12
sorry...lol

I use a sponge cake with a whipped cream frosting and jam. The best recipe I have ever used comes from Williams-Sonma. It comes out light and so yummy. They call it their classic Birthday cake. I can make this one in my sleep.

http://www.williams-sonoma.com/recipe/sponge-cake-layers.html

Tip: have two bowls ready - one for the egg whites and one for yolks. Sift (don't skip this) cake flour.

You can use buttercream but I would make it one of the lighter versions (not the shortening kind).
post #5 of 12
Try a Sponge or Genoise both can be flavored as desired. Like, Lemon, Orange, Almond...

Those are my go to cakes. They always turn out nice.

My recipes are Gluten Free ones, but these are popular cakes and I'm sure you can find the recipe either online or in just about any cookbook (with cake) or cake book.

The love "The Cake Bible" by Rose Levy Beranbaum

An excellent resource for all things cake, well worth the money. Or maybe you can get it at your local library.

Good Luck

Quinte West, Ontario, Canada   www.TeriLovesCake.ca   Strictly Wheat & Gluten-Free         

 

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Quinte West, Ontario, Canada   www.TeriLovesCake.ca   Strictly Wheat & Gluten-Free         

 

Reply
post #6 of 12
DizzyMaiden, does this recipe hold up to a fondant finish? thanks icon_smile.gif


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dizzymaiden

sorry...lol

I use a sponge cake with a whipped cream frosting and jam. The best recipe I have ever used comes from Williams-Sonma. It comes out light and so yummy. They call it their classic Birthday cake. I can make this one in my sleep.

http://www.williams-sonoma.com/recipe/sponge-cake-layers.html

Tip: have two bowls ready - one for the egg whites and one for yolks. Sift (don't skip this) cake flour.

You can use buttercream but I would make it one of the lighter versions (not the shortening kind).
post #7 of 12
You didn't indicate whether you wanted scratch or doctored. I am a hobby baker, but have found these two recipes will produce excellent, consistent, smooth results. (I use other recipes in addition to these, but for a guaranteed success, these are my "go-to" recipes. They can also be changed with different additions to the recipes.)

INDYDEBI CRISCO-BASED BUTTERCREAM--(Excellent for hot/humid areas):
(IndyDebi is a very experienced decorator/caterer: http://cateritsimple.blogspot.com/)
Single Batch Recipe:
1-1/3 cups Crisco (BETTER: store brand shortening with 3 grams of trans-fats, or BEST, a specialty cake supply product called high-ratio shortening. As of 2010 Crisco no longer contains trans-fats.)
1/3 to 1/2 cup milk, depending on consistency needed
3 Tbsp powdered Dream Whip (powdered whipped topping mix made by Kraft Foods)
2-3 Tbsp clear vanilla, depending on personal taste (optional: almond extract, or lemon extract )
2 lbs. powdered pure cane sugar
IndyDebi says: There's no wrong way to mix this. I usually mix all but the powdered sugar & milk for a minute or two, then gradually alternate the sugar & milk, but the only reason I do this is to avoid the "sugar-splash" factor. The longer the mixer runs, the smoother it gets. Sifting the powdered sugar before blending helps with smoothness but is not necessary.
NOTE: Based on recommendations from other users of her recipe: 1) I make a double batch so the beaters are totally immersed to avoid air bubbles, 2) I beat the shortening, milk, Dream Whip, and vanilla for 10-15 minutes BEFORE I add the powdered sugar. I refrigerate or freeze leftover icing.

---------------------

This cake recipe is very dependable, consistent, tasty, & durable enough to stack and carve. It also makes lovely cupcakes. You can use gel colors to color the batter. This is a version of a cake recipe from the book: The Cake Mix Doctor, by Anne Byrn, ISBN: 0761117199. [EVERY baker should own this book!]

Sour Cream White Cake
1 package (18.25 oz.) Duncan Hines white cake mix
1 cup sour cream
1/2 cup canola oil
3 large eggs
1 teaspoon pure almond (you can also used vanilla, lemon, etc.) extract
post #8 of 12
INDYDEBI CRISCO-BASED BUTTERCREAM is nice but I would use high-ratio shortening which you can buy online. It has a much better mouth feel.

I have been doing this for many (more than I care to mention) years and over that time I have found that it is better to stick with high end ingredients if you want the wow factor. I have tried to sneak in imitation flavors or box mixes (which are fine for most occasions) but I always get the same reaction "we like this cake but can we have the same as before"?
post #9 of 12
I tend to make docotored or butter cakes.
I looked at the William sonoma recipe and wondered if it is a dry cake since there is no fat (butter or oil) listed in the ingredients. Advice?
post #10 of 12
I looked at the William sonoma recipe and wondered if it is a dry cake since there is no fat (butter or oil) listed in the ingredients. Advice?

It is a sponge so yes it would be considered a "dry" cake - however I wrap with clear plastic when the layers are almost cool and then put in fridge overnight. Then I use simple syrups that I boil down with fresh fruit or lemon or whatever you want to wet the top (not soak) of the layers.

This is a good cake if you are not worried about traveling, heat or long sit time.

When it is necessary to use a doctored box mix I always use the white almond sour cream cake recipe! This is beautiful with almost every frosting and filling.

http://cakecentral.com/recipe/white-almond-sour-cream-cake-wasc
post #11 of 12
I am going to say no. Even a thin layer might sink the cake.

Love your name...are you really stuck on the farm? I am stuck in the suburbs!

Quote:
Originally Posted by StuckOnTheFarm

DizzyMaiden, does this recipe hold up to a fondant finish? thanks icon_smile.gif


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dizzymaiden

sorry...lol

I use a sponge cake with a whipped cream frosting and jam. The best recipe I have ever used comes from Williams-Sonma. It comes out light and so yummy. They call it their classic Birthday cake. I can make this one in my sleep.

http://www.williams-sonoma.com/recipe/sponge-cake-layers.html

Tip: have two bowls ready - one for the egg whites and one for yolks. Sift (don't skip this) cake flour.

You can use buttercream but I would make it one of the lighter versions (not the shortening kind).

post #12 of 12
I use the WASC method with most of my cakes and they're pretty sturdy with a pound cake-like texture. Also, if you're using the traditional buttercream (butter, shortening, powdered sugar), don't mix it too long or too high to avoid whipping air into it. Using a crusting buttercream allows you to smooth using the Viva paper towel method.
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