Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cake Decorating › whipped ganache for piping?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

whipped ganache for piping?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
I tried whipped ganache for filling between layers then covering a cake before adding fondant. I loved working with it and loved the taste, but am wondering if anyone can tell me if I can pipe with it. I know it dries hard and it dries quickly, which makes me hesitant to try it. Has anyone tried using whipped ganache for, say, the pretty petal effect or the rosette cakes or even for making flowers?
TIA icon_smile.gif
post #2 of 9
Hi,
I have used whipped ganache to pipe with but I havent made any rosettes or petals with it. I suppose that it would work for those too. But hopefully, someone who has done rosettes and petals will chime in on this post.

Good Luck
I can do ALL things Through Christ who strengthens ME!!!
CAKE IS MY LIFE!!!!
Reply
I can do ALL things Through Christ who strengthens ME!!!
CAKE IS MY LIFE!!!!
Reply
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by msthang1224

Hi,
I have used whipped ganache to pipe with but I havent made any rosettes or petals with it. I suppose that it would work for those too. But hopefully, someone who has done rosettes and petals will chime in on this post.

Good Luck



msthang1224:
What do you mean you've piped with it? Was it just to spread the ganache on the cake? Did you find you had to work quickly so it didn't get hard in the bag?
Thank you for responding!
post #4 of 9
I've piped with it...but borders and such. It works fine. You should be able to pipe flowers and petals with it. If it's very humid it might be a problem. Don't know what you mean by it 'getting hard in the bag'. If anything, hot hands might make it too soft so keep that in mind. Most ganache stays somewhat pliable even after drying.

I've frozen whipped ganache and used it with no problem. You might try experimenting with some. Just freeze the leftovers for another cake.

If I am ever on life support, unplug me...

Then plug me back in.  See if that works!

Reply

If I am ever on life support, unplug me...

Then plug me back in.  See if that works!

Reply
post #5 of 9
When I make ganache, I let it set overnight. The next morning I put a hand mixer and whip it. It's this texture I can pipe with if I so choose. Otherwise I heat it up GENTLY and pour over a cake. That's the difference between the two consistencies and how you achieve them. Hope that helps! icon_biggrin.gif
To find "THE RECIPE LINKS ARE HERE" thread, click on "Forums", then "Recipes" and it's the first sticky. Latest updates are on (the bottom of) page 10 here: http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopic-625803-135.html
Reply
To find "THE RECIPE LINKS ARE HERE" thread, click on "Forums", then "Recipes" and it's the first sticky. Latest updates are on (the bottom of) page 10 here: http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopic-625803-135.html
Reply
post #6 of 9
Hi,

When i said i have piped with it, i mean exactly what our fellow cake buddies just said. I have done my borders etc with it. Depending on what you or yr customer wants, yes, you can spread the whipped ganache on your cake like a regular icing, i've done it plenty of times.

HTH
I can do ALL things Through Christ who strengthens ME!!!
CAKE IS MY LIFE!!!!
Reply
I can do ALL things Through Christ who strengthens ME!!!
CAKE IS MY LIFE!!!!
Reply
post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
Thank you for your responses and advice!

I followed Inspired By Michelle directions for making ganache when I tried it. I wisked after the chocolate was all melted and refrigerated overnight. The next day, I just let it sit out to bring it back to room temperature. The consistency was like a very stiff buttercream. It worked great for covering the cake, but I think it was only for covering the cake because it hardened quickly. What I mean by that it was sort of like a truffle. It wasn't hard as a rock, but hard like the outside of a chocolate candy, if that makes sense. Then again, maybe I did something wrong! I will whip it next time after refrigeration and try piping after that.

Thank you again icon_smile.gif
post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by experimenting

Thank you for your responses and advice!

I followed Inspired By Michelle directions for making ganache when I tried it. I wisked after the chocolate was all melted and refrigerated overnight. The next day, I just let it sit out to bring it back to room temperature. The consistency was like a very stiff buttercream. It worked great for covering the cake, but I think it was only for covering the cake because it hardened quickly. What I mean by that it was sort of like a truffle. It wasn't hard as a rock, but hard like the outside of a chocolate candy, if that makes sense. Then again, maybe I did something wrong! I will whip it next time after refrigeration and try piping after that.

Thank you again icon_smile.gif



You made it way different than I do. I heat the cream (12 oz heavy cream) until it just starts to get bubbles around the edge and feels hot to the touch. You can also put a spoon in it and take it out and run your finger along the back -- if it maintains a separation with your finger track in the center it's ready. (I hope that made sense!) At this point stir in any flavorings you want.

In a large, plastic bowl, have 24 oz of chocolate chopped into small chips. I've used brand name semi-sweet chocolate chips with no problem. Pour the hot cream over the chocolate and give the bowl a gentle shake to cover the chocolate. Count to 10, then take a whisk and stir until it's shiny and smooth (this will take about 2 minutes.) You can also work with a hand mixer but I've found that's not necessary. If you get lumps, that means your cream wasn't warm enough.

At this point cover with plastic wrap, leaving the plastic wrap right on the surface of the ganache. Let set on the counter overnight (preferably in a cool room) -- do not refrigerate. The next morning it will be a good consistency to scoop out and make truffles, or put a hand mixer in and whip up for piping. If you want to pour it over a cake, make sure the cake is chilled (not frozen solid) and heat up the ganache lightly (don't put it in the microwave on high for 10 minutes, it's chocolate -- it doesn't take much to melt it.) Then pour over your cake.

I've been doing it this way for years with no problems. Hope that helps! icon_biggrin.gif
To find "THE RECIPE LINKS ARE HERE" thread, click on "Forums", then "Recipes" and it's the first sticky. Latest updates are on (the bottom of) page 10 here: http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopic-625803-135.html
Reply
To find "THE RECIPE LINKS ARE HERE" thread, click on "Forums", then "Recipes" and it's the first sticky. Latest updates are on (the bottom of) page 10 here: http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopic-625803-135.html
Reply
post #9 of 9
I prefer not to whip my ganache. I have a couple of professional books on chocolate and whipping the ganache incorporates air which reduces it's shelf life.

I make my ganache a couple of different ways depending on what I'm going to use it for but to use it as frosting or filling I use
12 oz of chocolate to 8 oz of cream.

I usually make it the day before, refrigerate it and the next day set it on the counter to bring to room temp. Once at room tip, it's spreadable and pipeable. I usually use it for the big swirls on cupcakes but the consistency is wonderful.

If your ganache is drying out , you may want to try a recipe that includes more cream or even a little butter.

I have not tried to make flowers with it but I can't make flowers out of BC either so there is no hope for me thereicon_smile.gif
Visit me at www.keeponcaking.com for tutorials and other cake stuff.
Reply
Visit me at www.keeponcaking.com for tutorials and other cake stuff.
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cake Decorating
Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cake Decorating › whipped ganache for piping?