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Tips on making a cake recipe more sturdy?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
I'm trying to lock down a scratch recipe and looked into making this one.

2 1/4 cup cake flour
2 1/2 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 stick butter
1 1/2 cup sugar
3 large eggs
3/4 cup milk
1 tsp vanilla

The author says it is light and fluffy but sturdy enough for wedding cakes, but this thing turned out so soft, I can't even flip it without a using a kitchen utensil of some sort.

Any ideas on making it more sturdy? As far as the cake itself, it taste amazing, maybe a tad bit strong on the sugar side though, that would be one thing I changed in the recipe. But since I've never played with ingredients before, I wasn't sure what would need to be changed for structure. More eggs and less liquid maybe?
post #2 of 21
I am not some one who can adapt the science of ingredients, but I do however take a recipe and try adaptations, maybe sub sour cream for 1/2 the milk. It may be a bit dry, so brush with simple syrup.
post #3 of 21
add 1/2 cup regular flour, minus 1/4th cup of the sugar, add 1 egg yolk, unfortunately trial and error is the way to go, good luck
post #4 of 21
Thread Starter 
Good suggestions so far.

As for sour cream, does anyone know how it affects the cake "taste wise"

I also have read a little more and saw where some suggest jello pudding mix as well. It is hard to imagine how these 2 ingredients would affect the taste.

A side question (as me and my wife had a disagreement on this). What do you do with the cake after you make it and see it is not what you really wanted?

My suggestion was to throw it in the trash, as no one will want just "cake".

Her suggestion was to make buttercream and go ahead and take it to work so that we are not wasting money.

I felt that we are wasting more money (and time) by either making buttercream or buying icing and giving it to people just to eat. Why waste more money?

I couldn't get her to see my side, and I couldn't see hers. LOL icon_smile.gif

I am trying to really nail this down for my 2nd attempt as to not "waste" more money. I also am going to need to increase the size as it doesn't even fill 2 8x2 pans at all.
post #5 of 21
If you have no birds around, take it to work unfrosted, they will eat it or take it home and frost themselves, just put a sign saying , pls take and add frosting at home. On a side note, birds outside my home will not eat sweetened breads or any of my gluten free breads, lol
post #6 of 21
As for adding sour cream, I have done this before and the cake became denser, but I'm at a loss as to how to describe the taste change, since I usually just add half a cup of sour cream, the taste changes but barely discernible. by the way, if a recipe already calls for sour cream, I would not add any more to it. Let us know the end result, icon_smile.gif
post #7 of 21
Maybe letting the cake settle for 24 hours. The recipe I fallow is similar to that and the person who wrote it suggested leaving the cake to settle for 24 hours. It should be sturdy enough at that period.
post #8 of 21
Let it rest overnight and pop it in the freezer. If it's frozen or partially frozen you can handle it better.
post #9 of 21
I would reduce the baking powder by half and change the milk to buttermilk.
post #10 of 21
Thread Starter 
Ok going to try this.

3 cups cake flour
1 tbsp baking powder
1 tsp salt
1 cup milk (dont have buttermilk, but would like to know the difference it would make. will research)
1 tsp vanilla
1 stick butter
1 1/2 cup sugar (because I'm adding more flour, overall the recipe would be lower in sugar)
4 eggs
1/4 cup sour cream (would like to know the taste difference as well)

I did bring the cake to work without icing or anything, and the comment I received was "taste like pound cake". Now that isn't a bad thing, as they loved the cake, but after looking up pound cake recipes, I can't see where this is going to change. Pound cakes have sugar, and that is the dominate taste (to me) in this cake. But I do realize that sugar is a factor in making it moist, so in the end I wouldn't be completely against it "tasting" like pound cake as long as it isn't hard like pound cake. I'm wanting it to support fondant, not a train.
post #11 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnnieCahill

Let it rest overnight and pop it in the freezer. If it's frozen or partially frozen you can handle it better.



Yes, that is true about letting it sit for a period of time. I didn't throw it away, so when I get home today I will be able to see if it is any better.

The only reason I didn't freeze it, was due to the fact that when the fondant goes on it, it will not be frozen. I need to know what it's density is while not frozen. But yes, I do freeze my cakes for a short period of time before I crumb coat, just to make it easier. Ultimately it goes back to it's original state after the freezing period is over. I just don't want the fondant to bring it down. thumbs_up.gif
post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by usmdesigner

Ok going to try this.

3 cups cake flour
1 tbsp baking powder
1 tsp salt
1 cup milk (dont have buttermilk, but would like to know the difference it would make. will research)
1 tsp vanilla
1 stick butter
1 1/2 cup sugar (because I'm adding more flour, overall the recipe would be lower in sugar)
4 eggs
1/4 cup sour cream (would like to know the taste difference as well)

I did bring the cake to work without icing or anything, and the comment I received was "taste like pound cake". Now that isn't a bad thing, as they loved the cake, but after looking up pound cake recipes, I can't see where this is going to change. Pound cakes have sugar, and that is the dominate taste (to me) in this cake. But I do realize that sugar is a factor in making it moist, so in the end I wouldn't be completely against it "tasting" like pound cake as long as it isn't hard like pound cake. I'm wanting it to support fondant, not a train.



With the cake flour, I still think you have a tad too much baking powder, so I would really be interested to hear how this turns out. Be sure and let us know. thumbs_up.gif
post #13 of 21
I think pound cake is terrible! I seriously lol'ed at the phrase of you wanting it to support fondant, not a train! When I see Buddy flopping 15 cakes on top of each other with no support and start carving, I shudder. Bleah.

But I too, want to know how it turns out.
Beginners, be sure to parrot advice and get your post count up as fast as you can. After all, it's not what you know, it's what people THINK you know.
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Beginners, be sure to parrot advice and get your post count up as fast as you can. After all, it's not what you know, it's what people THINK you know.
Reply
post #14 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annabakescakes

I think pound cake is terrible! I seriously lol'ed at the phrase of you wanting it to support fondant, not a train! When I see Buddy flopping 15 cakes on top of each other with no support and start carving, I shudder. Bleah.

But I too, want to know how it turns out.



Yeah, I actually like pound cake in the taste department, but trying to get a fluffy moist cake is my main goal. Combining that with a good structure is proving difficult the more I look into it. It's like everyone uses box cakes with variations.

I'm just tired of being limited to finding that when I pick up materials or want to make a cake. If something goes wrong and I need to finish a cake and didn't have enough boxes, I wouldn't want to have to pack up and head to walmart just to finish. Scratch cake materials are almost always at our house either way.

But the main most important was the fact that I just... don't... like... the WASC taste. I use to like box growing up, but now that I've had other cakes besides boxes, it is just a step down in taste for me. I am no expert in taste and couldn't pick it out in a line up, but I know it wouldn't rack in the top 5 if I was choosing 10. But for structure, I absolutely love it. It is almost impossible to break it or it fall apart even when I flip it. That is what I'm trying to get from a scratch cake.
post #15 of 21
Eggs and pudding mix do thicken up the batter a little. Pudding mix helps the taste, too- 4 eggs sounds plenty - but if you're having taste/moist problems, then I'd try adding some instant pudding mix to it.
I've learned so much from my mistakes..... I'm thinking of making a few more!
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I've learned so much from my mistakes..... I'm thinking of making a few more!
Reply
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