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how does Cookies by design ...... - Page 3

post #31 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by thecakemaker

This doesn't pertain to C by D but I have to throw this in here. Have you ever had a cookie from Starbucks? I bought my son a cookie with chocolate chunks in it and ended up standing in line to take it back! It was so hard that there's no way you could eat the thing! Maybe it has to do with how fresh they are. . . I'll never buy another cookie from Starbucks though!

Debbie



When I'm in line there, I will look at their cookie display and as I'm sure most of us do, think "MY cookies are better than those!" Then I see the price of 'em and I'm thinking "How do they get that price for that piece of crap?!"

The poor, unknowing public!
post #32 of 40
As a former employee, I know the icing is a form of buttercream, not royal. Also, if you do a cookie enough times, you can decorate it in 3 minutes, but some of them are too detailed to do in 3 minutes. You are not specifically "trained" to do one in 3 minutes. Each store is a franchise, so the quality of cookies and decorations depends on the hired help. Some are better than others. The baker at the one I worked at had it down to a science to get the cookies to the perfect thickness and still keep them soft. Sometimes, they were even too soft and tore off the sticks. I loved the way they tasted. I would eat the sample cookies all day long.
post #33 of 40
Did you decorate all of the cookies freehand? Are there any tools or tricks to how they get them so perfect? Thanks for participating in this thread ... it's very interesting!
post #34 of 40
bump..
post #35 of 40
I've just found this recipe on the net and was wondering if this one may be similar

Toba Garrett's Glace' Icing
1 lb. confectioners' sugar
3/8 cup milk
3/8 cup light corn syrup
flavoring as desired

In a mixing bowl, mix the sugar and milk first. Add corn syrup just until combined.
Divide to flavor and add color.
Lori
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Lori
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post #36 of 40
Four years ago, I used to work next door to a CBD and would only buy a cookie if it was made that morning. They even had a "free sample" on their counter of broken cookies which would be a nice little treat after lunch. From what I remember they were pretty good (thick, but fresh tasting. And the icing wasn't too hard)

However, 6 months ago, I decided to treat my daughters to a CBD cookie if they were good during their haircut. Sure enough they were angels and they picked the biggest cookie they could find. Unfortunately, we had to get out of there quickly because the smell of the cookies made me nauseous (I was 3 months pregnant at that time). And what did my daughters do? They only ate the icing.

Yes they are pretty expensive, but the cookies are about 5"+ in size. The cookie I bought for my daughter's cost $7.50 for one and that cookie looked like it was about 6" in size. From searching thru CC it seems like some price their cookies $1/inch plus $1 more for packaging.

Aileen
post #37 of 40
If the icing is a BC that crusts really firm, maybe it is similar to Karen's recipe (from Karens Cookies website - hope you don't mind me posting, Karen, if you're around...)

Meringue Powder Buttercream
1/3 cup water
3 T. meringue powder
½ cup shortening
4 ½ cups powdered sugar (1 lb. 3 oz. If you have a scale)
1 tsp. vanilla extract (use clear vanilla if you want a pure white icing)
¼ tsp. almond extract
Place half of the powdered sugar and the meringue powder in the bowl of an electric mixer. Whisk together well. Turn on mixer (use whip attachment) and, while motor is running, slowly stream in the water. Mix until everything is incorporated. Turn mixer to high speed and whip until stiff peaks form. Add flavorings and mix well. Change to paddle attachment (for stand mixer) or dough hook (for Bosch). If using a hand mixer, use the same beaters you were using before. Add remaining powdered sugar and shortening and whip for 2-3 minutes more.

Note: Don't skimp on the whipping time after adding the shortening. You really need to whip it well to prevent separation later.
- Natalie
"Blessed are the cheesemakers?"
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- Natalie
"Blessed are the cheesemakers?"
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post #38 of 40
Have you used that recipe before? If so, hows it taste and does it dry really firm? Hmmm, this may be something to try! Thanks for that Tubbs!
~ ~ Melanie
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~ ~ Melanie
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post #39 of 40
No, I haven't tried it - keep meaning to but haven't got around to it yet. I have to do some cookies later (for my 40th birthday party actually) - maybe I'll use this recipe instead of RI, since if it doesn't work out well, the 'client' won't complain too much!!
- Natalie
"Blessed are the cheesemakers?"
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- Natalie
"Blessed are the cheesemakers?"
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post #40 of 40
icon_lol.gif heehee It's always nice to have a "non-complaining" customer icon_wink.gif and yes please do try it if you feel like it. I would be very interested in knowing how they come out thumbs_up.gif
~ ~ Melanie
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~ ~ Melanie
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