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Baking by weight - Page 2

post #16 of 31
I started weighing ingredients when I received Toba Garrett's "The Well Decorated Cake". Whenever I bake now, I convert the cups to weight. My baking is much more consistent this way.
post #17 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by LisaPeps

In Europe all we use are scales. When trying American recipes for the first time, it's such a pain in the arse using the cups... and messy! I don't know how everyone hasn't converted to weighing yet, it's so easy to weigh everything out in one bowl (less washing up icon_biggrin.gif) and it's so easy to scale recipes as well!



Ditto!

I use a jug for liquids and a teaspoon or tablespoon (or the half versions) for very small amounts like baking powder otherwise its scales.
post #18 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jennifer353

Quote:
Originally Posted by LisaPeps

In Europe all we use are scales. When trying American recipes for the first time, it's such a pain in the arse using the cups... and messy! I don't know how everyone hasn't converted to weighing yet, it's so easy to weigh everything out in one bowl (less washing up icon_biggrin.gif) and it's so easy to scale recipes as well!



Ditto!

I use a jug for liquids and a teaspoon or tablespoon (or the half versions) for very small amounts like baking powder otherwise its scales.



Ditto ditto icon_smile.gif

I have a combo jug - liquids and solids (sugar, flour)
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post #19 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by scp1127

I only use weight. I have a conversion chart hanging on my refrigerator to convert any recipe not already in weights.



Where did you find your conversion chart? I am moving more toward weights instead of measuring but have problems finding the conversions. Many from internet have only a few ingredients.

I am also moving toward weighting my batter in each pan to avoid having too much or too little. But, does anyone else find they have to use more that the recommended amount to get the full 2" layers?
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post #20 of 31
Tea42, if you have recipes that work for you, weigh your own amounts in the measuring cups. This will keep your recipes your own. Sometimes those variances from a recipe are what makes it a success.

All lists are small. You just need to start your own. For example, shortening... weigh it once and never use a cup measure again. Just lay wax paper over your scales and plop it on. When you start weighing water, honey, milk, etc., your baking life will be so much easier and consistent. I would recommend weighing liquids in grams. For example, my sticky bun sauce is water, honey, and heavy cream added to the butter and sugar. I get one big 4 c measure and measure all individually right in the same container. No eye level and no mess.
post #21 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tea42

Quote:
Originally Posted by scp1127

I only use weight. I have a conversion chart hanging on my refrigerator to convert any recipe not already in weights.



Where did you find your conversion chart? I am moving more toward weights instead of measuring but have problems finding the conversions. Many from internet have only a few ingredients.

I am also moving toward weighting my batter in each pan to avoid having too much or too little. But, does anyone else find they have to use more that the recommended amount to get the full 2" layers?



This is the one that was recommended to me by someone on cc:

http://www.joepastry.com/category/baking-basics/ingredient-weights/

I was thinking of the same thing with my batter. But the answer to your last question is yes I do use more the recommended amount.
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post #22 of 31
post #23 of 31
Great information! Thanks for posting this topic. I like the idea of weighing the batter in the cake pans. I'm assuming this would help all of the layers to bake up to an even height? I do tend to overfill my pan so that when I level them, I can make them all even, but maybe weighing the batter would help with that without so much wasted cake. Thanks!!
post #24 of 31
By the way, weigh your cake pans first. Some pans change slightly and the weight will be different. I use WS Goldtouch and they are always improving, and making heavier, their pans. Just know your pans.
post #25 of 31
I do three layer cakes most of the time. So knowing the mixer bowl's weight, I weigh it again with the mixed batter and divide by 3 (in grams), then I place the first pan in the scale and tare/zero it and pour the exact amount of batter. Take it off, place the second one, tare/zero it, and pour the second part of the batter in...exact amounts in the 3 of them.
post #26 of 31
Good idea imagen... sometimes I have to do the spoon shuffle to equal it out... and those pans being off are like the three cup shuffle when you forget where you put the heavy one.
post #27 of 31
I started baking only and only by weighting in grams since the beginning. Everything is easier and more accurate.
To make the matters easier for myself I made a table in words program and wrote all the conversion from volume to weight of most common ingredients used in baking so I do not have to go back to online sources for conversion every time I am baking a new recipe.
I also note the weight measurement of recipes in front of the volume measurements as I go through recipes baking one by one so when I want to bake a recipe I have the conversions already on the recipe.

Edited to add;

I uploaded the table conversions as photo in my album, hope someone would benefit from it. icon_smile.gif

I am not sure if I can upload a chart or not?! icon_confused.gif

I used the below site for my conversions.

http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/index.html
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post #28 of 31



I checked Joe Pastry and the Vegan Baking site for the weight of 1 cup of AP flour. They differ by 1/2 ounce. How do you know which chart is the best?
post #29 of 31
Yes, some places have 4 1/4 oz, some 4 1/2, some 5. As SCP said before, make your own chart.

I weigh in grams and I've found weights for a cup of flour that go from 115 to 123 to 125 grams, I sometimes just choose the middle ground, it will be 120 grams for me.

That's why at the beginning, you'll have to compare charts and other conversion systems out there to compile your own. Even measure your own and weigh, as SCP advised.
post #30 of 31
My first chart weighed AP flour at 5. I just kept with it. Since I adjust all of my recipes anyway, the 5 isn't an issue. So if you make your own recipes, it doesn't matter. Now that I'm converting to grams, I'm using the measurements of top chefs. For example, if Joanne Chang has it at xx grams, I just add it to the chart. I don't measure and weigh myself.

Get a top-rated cookbook that has both grams/oz. Try it out with confidence and you won't go back.

I use my wonderful All Clad measuring cups as scoops.
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