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CakeSafe vs. Cake Stacker System which is better? - Page 3

post #31 of 85
I am a bit tone with which system to invest in. They all have their pluses and minuses.

CakeStackers have a million and a half pieces and I haven't quite figured out if you can do odd sized tiers. I tried calling and emailing them a couple of times and got no response. I am weary of ordering from them in case I need customer service in the future.

CakeSafe, just checked them out seems neat, but you still have to cut dowels/straws. The price seems Very steep.

StressFree, well I would not to have to cut dowels, but I am not sure how secure the tiers are to each other. I guess maybe a dowel down the middle will do it?

and then there is SPS, no a huge fan of having to bake to 4 in or deal with cutting the big tubes, but it does seem very secure because of the little nob on top of each plate that goes into the cardboard of the next tier up.

Ahhh, decisions, decisions, wish someone would just make up my mind for me icon_smile.gif
post #32 of 85
Alliecakes82, I agree, the cakestacker does have a million pieces. I use a clear divided craft box to separate and store all of the parts. However, the little pieces help with the odd size tiers. You customize to what you need. The ice-cream cone cake I have in my photos was 23" tall! The cone was all cake as well as the "scoops". It was done on a cakestacker system. It was moved from the island, to the stove, to the island, to the table and back to the island! It didn't move! I'm not sure about why you are not getting a response though. I didn't have a problem when I called them. I actually spoke with him (they guy who invented it and made it for his wife) on several occasions before I wrote that check! Has it been recently? I was talking to a lady who was at the ICES convention about it last week and she said that they had a booth at the convention. Maybe he was at that? The way he talked, he was the only one doing that end of it. There are other who manufacture and ship.
post #33 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by alliecakes82

I am a bit tone with which system to invest in. They all have their pluses and minuses.

CakeStackers have a million and a half pieces and I haven't quite figured out if you can do odd sized tiers. I tried calling and emailing them a couple of times and got no response. I am weary of ordering from them in case I need customer service in the future.

CakeSafe, just checked them out seems neat, but you still have to cut dowels/straws. The price seems Very steep.

StressFree, well I would not to have to cut dowels, but I am not sure how secure the tiers are to each other. I guess maybe a dowel down the middle will do it?

and then there is SPS, no a huge fan of having to bake to 4 in or deal with cutting the big tubes, but it does seem very secure because of the little nob on top of each plate that goes into the cardboard of the next tier up.

Ahhh, decisions, decisions, wish someone would just make up my mind for me icon_smile.gif



I emailed the cake stacker people and they emailed me twice today so keep trying. I am thinking of going with cake stackers because you don't have to buy things again if you get the reusable plate too. I really want to get the cake safe because it protects the cake from the elements, but buddy on the cake boss doesn't cover his cakes. Like you said decisions, decisions..
post #34 of 85
I have the cakestacker system which I love for:
being wildly creative, doing outside the box designs, tilted, or 3d (like someone here did the ice cream cone) hang from ceiling upside down etc.etc. I love it for 3 or 4 tier cakes that I am going to transport already assembled. I also love it for having all the pieces to do a thick tier or a thin tier or whatever my crazy imagination dreams up. The ribbon cutter saved my butt this week. Not crazy about using it as a turntable but have done it in a pinch. Anything you put on it is rock solid. Love being able to do tall separations and gravity defying looks.

What I do not love as much about it:
LOTS of pieces. LOTS. So yes you either have to take a hefty deposit or have your own cake cutting service who brings the thing back. Also do not love assembling a cake on site in front of onlookers with all these bits and pieces. Which is why I decided to purchase the stress free system. OK YES I have some cash tied up in cake support systems but I own a cake business.... and instead of buying 2 of the same system I opted for one of each. I like the stress free for LARGE cakes which I intend to assemble on site (As in TOO LARGE and TOO HEAVY to move assembled!) as sadly I do not have a Mr.Universe on staff. On those cakes having the support system already in the cake before leaving the bakery makes assembly on site - stress free. It also has way less pieces and is easier for people to disassemble than the cake stackers system. AMAZING how even after training people on taking a cake apart from the cake stackers system some people still REALLY struggle to do it.

What I do not like about the stress free system - damn I miss that center post from the cake stackers system when I use this instead. So nice to know everything is automatically lined up, no playing with each tier a little this way... a little that, is it centered??? Uh mmmm I think so. Also do not like that for different height tiers I have to buy a whole other set of legs.

as a cheap alternative I do like "cakethings" support system which I learned about and got a 15.00 show special on at ICES. It is nice for tiered cakes at smaller events. www.cakethings.com, infact if I had learned about this first I probably would not have ever purchased the stress free system. This does the same thing and you cut your own legs to whatever hieght instead of buying a set of this size leg, a set of that size leg etc. oh and from cake things the racketing dowel cutters are a dream for cutting dowels.

They all have their place. All have strengths and weaknesses. If I had to choose only one I would choose cake stackers.

As for the pricey box (cake safe) $400.00 to $500.00 for a BOX?! Yes I know it is a very nice reusable box, but you can buy a cakestackers AND a stress free support system for the price of that box! Sheesh

- I use a shipping box covered in contact paper.

Uploading things here that are non cake can be a challenge so sometime on a less busy week I will upload a photo of my make-it-yourself cake delivery box to my blog and post a link. It is large enough for a 3 tier cake, still have to work out something for the 4 tier cakes. Anything 5 tiers or larger I transport separate not stacked my muscles just ain't that big.
post #35 of 85
Kattiebelle74: WOW! I am in awe! It was nice to see a review of so many different products from a single person! I am looking forward to your posting of the cake box. I like the idea of having something covering the cake from the elements. Around here, there is a lot of raining weekends! I was looking at the "stress free" products before I bought my stacker. I just like that center post! I don't like putting it together either! My DH is the right man for the job! He also decorates, stacks, carries and delivers! Oh how I love that man!!!! He and one of his brothers actually carried that 5 tier and delivered it together (again thanks to Jennifer Dontz for holding my hand on that one!) We deliver stacked because most venues here can not accommodate my late hours. I have a 12 hr a day business and do this after the kids go to bed. Also, we don't use the stacker on 2 tier cakes. We use regular poly dowels and a center dowel. However, I am still always looking at the latest and greatest things! Will look at the cakething!
post #36 of 85
[quote="alliecakes82"]

and then there is SPS, no a huge fan of having to bake to 4 in or deal with cutting the big tubes, but it does seem very secure because of the little nob on top of each plate that goes into the cardboard of the next tier up.
[/quote]

SPS legs come pre-cut 4", 5" 7" and 9"

Just FYI
Answers to the most often asked questions re: SPS. SPS instructions are on Page 15 of the Sticky at the top of the Cake Decorating Forum. Supplies can be ordered from Oasis Supply, Global or BakeryCrafts.
Reply
Answers to the most often asked questions re: SPS. SPS instructions are on Page 15 of the Sticky at the top of the Cake Decorating Forum. Supplies can be ordered from Oasis Supply, Global or BakeryCrafts.
Reply
post #37 of 85
I have and use a CakeSafe in conjunction with SPS. I use a small hole saw to drill a circle in the middle of my SPS plates. Yes, I know that gets rid of the notch, but I use double stuck foam tape to adhere the board to the SPS plate, and have had no problems. Then I stack the cake as usual and put in the CakeSafe for delivery. The hole that the metal rod from the Cake Safe leaves is not very big at all, and is very easy to patch. Very easy. Even when there is no topper. I love the CakeSafe as a preventive tool. No accidental bumps into the icing during delivery, no worries when it's raining and I have to take the cake into the venue, etc. Did I mention that I LOVE my CakeSafe?
post #38 of 85
Thread Starter 
Katiebelle, Thank you so much for all of your information!!!!!! You are a great baker and friend to all of use here. You said that you separate the 5 tier cakes. You can do that with cake stakes? Cake stackers can get pricey if you buy all of the different sets. That's one thing I was thinking about. With the cake safe you can do different types of cakes. I am leaning towrd the cake stackers because I am just a hobby baker.
post #39 of 85
I don't like SPS because it is a pain in the a$$ to get out of the cake. So when you disassemble it you have to fight with it to get out to serve the lower tier.

I use a shipping box with the front cut down so it flaps open to transport cakes. I wouldn't dream of delivering a cake uncovered. So many things can go wrong. Rain... dirt... bird poop... it's food and it should be protected from the elements.

I know people will swear that it's detrimental, but I use cardboard cake circles and bubble tea straws with a central dowel for all of my cakes. I put a hole in the bottom of the board of the top tier and place the top tier on once it's built. I always transport the cake chilled so it is nice and solid and not going to shift in the layers. I know it's not scientific, but it works. I transport cakes fully assembled and boxed up for transport. The only time I'd transport not fully assembled is if it was a REALLY tall cake that wouldn't fit in my car.
post #40 of 85
inspiredby mom, the "cakethings" support system is a great cheap option that is still reusable option for 2 and 3 tier bday cakes etc... you know the smaller parties that still want an impressive cake but you don't always want to send your $$ system out with. Also LOVE the 3" support piece to keep in cake kit *IN CASE* of heavy cake topper;

sberryp I do not understand what you are asking...?? you can make the center post with cake stackers as tall or short as you want for separation, you can also cut dowels as tall or short as you like if using the "cakethings" and fill space with flowers to cover dowels. If I were only a hobby baker and not getting my money's worth from it being a biz investment then I would suggest you buy the "cakethings" support system MAKE sure to get the brawny board with hole for center column (dowel) as your base board (also nice 1/2" thick easy to decorate with ribbon) and get the my thin boards with holes instead of cardboard cake circles (also washable/reusable) use with the cakethings hex supports for each tier. That will still be plenty solid for your grandparents cake. No need to invest hundreds in a support system if you are just baking for family and friends here and there.

http://cakethings.com/stack-a-cake.html

http://cakethings.com/stack-a-cake-how-to.html

http://cakethings.com/cake-boards.html

Dunno how big a cake you are making but this is a durable system for way less money, unless you have intentions of going pro someday.
post #41 of 85
Katiebelle74: I looked at the cakething during lunch. I think it has potential to be in my arsenal! Especially for the smaller ones. I don't let my stacker out for those. I could still have my center dowel that I am very fond of! I will have to show it to my DH. He keeps me grounded. In this business one can spend LOTS of money! icon_smile.gif

For sberryP: that cakething may be an answer for you. It doesn't look to be the big investment. You can always go bigger later! Don't get me wrong, I LOVE my stacker but my end desire was to get into bigger wedding cakes in the future when I retire from daycare.....ha ha ha!
post #42 of 85
Thread Starter 
I am currently a teacher, and hope to own my cake business soon. This cake is very important to me because it's going to be 5 tiers and it's my grandparents 50th anniversary. I want something that I can use for the cakes that I make. I have a cake disaster with a 3 tier cake, where a friend slammed on the breaks and the top tier was lost. This cake have to hold up for a 12 hour cake ride. So I need something very solid. I do about 2 cakes a month and more in the summer months.
post #43 of 85
Thread Starter 
Katiebelle, I am asking if you can separate the cake with the cake stackers one 3 tiers high and one 2 tiers high and then put together on site. 1 because the top 2 tiers would not be on a base plate and I only saw the cake assembled all at once on here website. Sorry for typos and grammatical errors I am tired, sick, and have a new baby.
post #44 of 85
If you plan to have a biz in the future then buy the cake stackers.

You could assemble the bottom 3 on cake stackers but would have to transport the top 2 separate and add the top 2 one by one after you arrived.

Hope you feel better!
post #45 of 85
Correct me if I'm wrong, but the "cake stacker system" is just push in pillars that are metal and screwed to the plates. Period. It supports the next tier up as you are adding tiers, but there is no stabilizer or connector to/through all the tiers as there is in the CakeSafe. The cake stacker is in reality nothing new.

Any supports/pillars that push directly into the cake are going to be more stable than those that are resting on top/in between tiers. That is a proven fact.
Sandy
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Sandy
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