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cover every cake board? - Page 2

post #16 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apti

I also use Reynolds freezer paper in the 18 inch wide roll to cover my work area when working with chocolate. I rip off a big piece and tape to my counter by the microwave, shiny side up, and rip off another big piece and place on my work area. When I'm done, just wad it up and clean up the stray chocolate bit that escaped. It's wonderful!

Use the freezer paper to cover cake boards (only the square or rectangles because it doesn't look so good on round).



It looks fine on rounds--I do it all the time-- but you will have to cover the sides of the board with ribbon to hide the slits--besides, ribbons add a nice touch anyway.

First, cut a circle a couple of inches or more bigger than your round, put a double sided piece of tape in the center of the top of your board and place it down on the dull side of the paper so that when you are finished, the shiny side of the paper will be up. Then cut slits in the paper all around the board--this creates tabs that you can then pull up and tape onto the back of the board. Don't cut them too wide or it will give the board an uneven edge. Pull tightly before taping them down. And when you pull, notice the best direction to place it so the sides will be smoother.

Also, if you cut the paper too close up to the edge of the board, you will end up with little slits all around the top edge of your board. Not good. The goal is to get the top as smooth around as possible and then cover the sides with ribbon to hide the cut paper. Do a couple of small practice rounds and you'll understand what I mean. I always cover the small cardboard rounds I use for tiered cakes as well.

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post #17 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marianna46

I've bought several and have been covering them in contact paper, which comes in several solid colors as well as transparent. I use the transparent plastic to put over wrapping paper or other decorative papers. I'm assuming this stuff is food-safe, since it can be used to line shelves (it's NOT the kind with insecticide in it!), but I thought I would just toss this out here in case anyone knows whether this is something I shouldn't be doing. I hope it's okay because the boards look really nice and they're so easy to do. Opinions, anyone?



NO! No type of contact paper is considered foodsafe. I have that info directly from the manufacturer.

No food that will be eaten should be placed directly on ANY type of contact paper, but particularly the colored/patterned papers, as the dyes in those papers contain lead, which can leach into food (especially acidic or greasy foods). All contact papers contain phthalates, a chemical that makes the vinyl of the paper extremely flexible. They're not good for human consumption.

There must be a barrier between the food and the contact paper. Putting the cake on a board the same size and then putting that on the contact paper covered board works fine. If border icing remains on the decorative board, it should be disgarded.

HTH
Rae
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I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
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post #18 of 36
I just cannot bring myself not to cover my boards. I don't use foamcore so it's always a purchased cake circle/board. It just HAS to be covered or I'm not happy. And usually it's covered w/mylar wrapping paper or fzr wrap.
post #19 of 36
I use foiled cake drums. Easy.
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Answers to the most often asked questions re: SPS. SPS instructions are on Page 15 of the Sticky at the top of the Cake Decorating Forum. Supplies can be ordered from Oasis Supply, Global or BakeryCrafts.
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post #20 of 36
I use foiled cake drums. Easy.
Answers to the most often asked questions re: SPS. SPS instructions are on Page 15 of the Sticky at the top of the Cake Decorating Forum. Supplies can be ordered from Oasis Supply, Global or BakeryCrafts.
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Answers to the most often asked questions re: SPS. SPS instructions are on Page 15 of the Sticky at the top of the Cake Decorating Forum. Supplies can be ordered from Oasis Supply, Global or BakeryCrafts.
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post #21 of 36
Thread Starter 
So are you moving your decorated cake onto the covered board or are you decorating the cake on the drum. I'm thinking I can smooth buttercream on a freezer paper covered board, right? But definitely not on a fondant covered board. I just hate moving perfect cakes because I always mess them up!
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post #22 of 36
Yes, I cover my cake drum with fondant (usually 24 hours before it's needed, so that the fondant sets).

Then, I move my fondant covered cake onto the cake drum and usually finish all the decorating when it's in place.
Inside this fat body, there's a thin woman screaming to get out...... but I can usually shut her up with chocolate!
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Inside this fat body, there's a thin woman screaming to get out...... but I can usually shut her up with chocolate!
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post #23 of 36
@ Relznik, i'm forever dinging my perfectly covered cake when i move it from my decorating board onto my cake board - how do you avoid this? I just purchased a cake lifter this week and am hoping this will eliminate this problem!
post #24 of 36
How do you lift it?

My cake is on some silicone/greaseproof type paper on the counter.

I pull the paper and cake so that the cake is *just* over the edge, so I can get my fingers/hand underneath it.

A blob of royal icing on the covered cake drum, to keep the cake in place... then I just lower the cake into place, removing my hand from underneath it at the last moment.
Inside this fat body, there's a thin woman screaming to get out...... but I can usually shut her up with chocolate!
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Inside this fat body, there's a thin woman screaming to get out...... but I can usually shut her up with chocolate!
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post #25 of 36
Relznik, i slide a thin sturdy metal spatula under the cake on one side and hold the other side with my hand, quick lift and onto board (attached with a blob on BC) - i always have to fix a bit of the sides from hand marks and squishing from the spatula. I wondered if i should leave the fondant to firm up first before transferring. I also noticed Mich Turner wears white cotton gloves when she stacks cakes, maybe this eliminates handmarks / damage to sugarpaste??
post #26 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by margiep

always fondant, unless it is directly displayed on a beautiful plate. I have seen the most beautiful cakes spoiled by using a cheap looking board.



So true
post #27 of 36
I think the cake board should match the cake.
I like to compare naked cake boards to getting all dressed up to go out in your fancy little black dress with your special jewelry and then wearing the dirty clogs you garden in.
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post #28 of 36
Thanks so much for your info and advice, Texas_Rose and BlakesCakes. I'll certainly stop doing it! I really don't like covering cake boards with fondant, but I'll definitely be putting a cardboard round or whatever shape I need between the cake and the cake board. I don't use ribbons on the edges, either, because my boards are so thin, even when I stack 2 or 3 together, which is why I liked the contact paper idea so much - sigh! What does anyone know about heavy plastic (just plain plastic, not the adhesive kind)? Probably has phthalates, too, huh?
Marianna
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Marianna
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post #29 of 36
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emmar308

Relznik, i slide a thin sturdy metal spatula under the cake on one side and hold the other side with my hand, quick lift and onto board (attached with a blob on BC) - i always have to fix a bit of the sides from hand marks and squishing from the spatula. I wondered if i should leave the fondant to firm up first before transferring. I also noticed Mich Turner wears white cotton gloves when she stacks cakes, maybe this eliminates handmarks / damage to sugarpaste??



Moving a fondant covered cake isn't a problem for me but I do 90% buttercream. Any tips on moving that onto the fondant covered board?
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post #30 of 36
I search for great wrapping papers that coordinate with the cake and then cover with food safe plastic. Under 12 inches, I buy scrapbook paper.
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