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Why can't fondant be in the fridge?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I've always read/heard that you shouldn't put a cake covered in fondant into the fridge. Why is this?
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Wilton graduate and proud cake business owner under FL Cottage Food Law. More cake photos here: www.FROSTEDChicCakes.com
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post #2 of 15
Its not true, you can put a fondant covered cake in the fridge. I've heard that people say you can't but Ive never seen anyone on CC say that. I have put all my fondant cakes in the fridge. I recently started using Satin Ice fondant and that comes out a little moist and shiny when you first take it out but that goes away.
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post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashleyssweetdesigns

Its not true, you can put a fondant covered cake in the fridge. I've heard that people say you can't but Ive never seen anyone on CC say that. I have put all my fondant cakes in the fridge. I recently started using fondant and that comes out a little moist and shiny when you first take it out but that goes away.



Does that moisture ever cause any of your decor to bleed? Colors bleeding and such?
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Wilton graduate and proud cake business owner under FL Cottage Food Law. More cake photos here: www.FROSTEDChicCakes.com
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post #4 of 15
My response to a thread about this last night:

A cold cake put into a warm/humid environment will sweat, just like an iced drink develops condensation on a glass. It's a given physical reaction.

If the air is very dry, the condensation may virtually non-existent.

It's just condensation. It'll dry.

If you're worried about color dripping because of condensation, or some other issue, you can box the cake, wrap the box with saran several times, and put that in the fridge. Don't take it out of the box until it's come to room temp. It can't form condensation then.

HTH
Rae
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They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
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I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
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post #5 of 15
You just need to be careful about the cake sweating. Putting your cake in the frig and removing to heat will cause it to sweat. If you have bright colors on your cake and it starts to sweat, it can really cause you some issues. If you aren't using perishable filling or icing, I wouldn't refrigerate for this reason. Now if you need to freeze it, then you would want to remove it from the freezer to the frig to thaw and then to the countertop after it has thawed out. Gradually bringing it back to room temperature decreases the chance of it sweating. But this also holds true for buttercream cakes removed from the refrigerator to a warm climate. They will sweat as well. If your home is air conditioned and cool then you probably wouldn't have a lot of issues, but if you don't have air conditioning and your home is hot...then yeah you are probably going to have some sweating issues.
post #6 of 15
My cakes are always taken out of the fridge into an air conditioned room. The sweating has never caused any problems with other decor on the cake. I do not put gumpaste in the fridge. If the cake has GP decorations I remove them before storing in the fridge. Bad past experiences! The ONLY time I do not store a fondant cake in the fridge is if I have airbrushed several colors on it. I've read that you shouldn't due to the possibility of bleeding colors. I wouldn't want to risk it.
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post #7 of 15
I prefer to refrigerate my fondant covered cakes - in AZ our room temp is about 80-82...not the most ideal temp for keeping a cake at for 12+ hours. When I remove them from the fridge - there is some condensation - I just leave it alone - UNTOUCHED, and it dries up nicely and looks the same as before. However, I wouldn't put an airbrushed or hand painted cake in the fridge for fear that the paint would run once it was removed from the fridge.
post #8 of 15
I've heard that also, but I have put every cake I've made so far in the fridge after its fully decorated (and every step in between) for the fear of ants getting to it. I can leave something on the counter all day, but leave it over night (like they know we're asleep and can't kill them) they attack. Never had a problem
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post #9 of 15
I made a Protein Shake container for my brother last year. It was all black fondant (duff's). The cake was awesome looking and I either didn't remember about the "no frig" remarks or forgot. Either way, I put the cake in the frig for literally 4 hours and when I got it out, within 10 minutes the cake had HUGE beads of sweat all over it. It was very noticeable and actually took away from the cake a bit, but most people in this area have never seen something like that, so it was ok in the end.

And I've seen some people say that it will eventually go away, but it was at least 2 hours before we cut the cake and they were still there.

Oh, and don't even think about trying to take something to "dab off" the sweat, because that looked absolutely horrible when I tried that.

I am in the south, and maybe that was just for me? I don't know, but I'll never put another fondant cake in the frig ever again based on my personally experience. icon_smile.gif

If anyone else says this doesn't happen for them, good for them icon_smile.gif
post #10 of 15
I think the amount of condensation def. depends upon where you live. In AZ our humidity hovers around 7-12% - thats pretty low, add in the fact that 100% of indoor space in AZ has central a/c which further dries out the air -those 2 factors are probably part of the reason the condensation evaporates so quickly here.
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by dukeswalker

I think the amount of condensation def. depends upon where you live.



Yep! This is why you see some people say they have no issues with it and others that do.

Where I am, I can't take anything out of the fridge with out condensation forming with in a few seconds. So I don't stick cakes in the fridge. Not a big issue for me anyway, since I don't generally use things in my cake that have to be put in the fridge.
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post #12 of 15
I refrigerate often and since I live in outrageous heat and humidity, condensation starts within about 2 minutes. I just let it set and it dries, the more humid it is, the longer it takes (and it can be several hours here) And if you dare try to wipe it off, you're in for quite a mess. As long as i leave it alone, everything's fine. Because of the condensation, I've never tried this on a cake that had to be painted (afraid the colors would run).
post #13 of 15

You made me laugh about the ants. Little buggers. icon_biggrin.gif

post #14 of 15

They say it can make the fondant "sweat" so its kind of shiny.  However I always put my fondant cakes in the fridge, and I've never had a problem. 

post #15 of 15

It never has for me, it just makes it kind of sticky for a little while.

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