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Heating core. Is it really necessary?????? - Page 2

post #16 of 29
I spray them with Pam then place them, point end up, on the prepared pan. Pour the batter over and when the cake is baked, invert on the cooling rack and just pick them off. The hole they leave is minimal. I used to use a heating core, but much prefer the nails. (The only advantage to the core was I could sample the cake when cutting it to the required size to insert.)

Jan
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If you have knowledge, let others light their candles on it.

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post #17 of 29
I have baked up to 16" ALWAYS with strips to prevent waste, but never with a core. Never had a problem.
post #18 of 29
post #19 of 29
Thanks for the link and comments will defiantly be trying out the nails next time. icon_smile.gif
post #20 of 29

Thank you thank you....this was the best advice.  I am making a wedding cake for 200 and am doing  14, 12, 10, 8, and 6 inch tiers.  Yesterday I did the 12 and 14 inch tiers and did exactly like you said and put the pans in for 30 mins at 300 and then turned it up to 325 unitl they were done.  Each pan took a different amount of time because of the size and amount of batter, but it worked out great.  No nails, no core, no strips.  And they were pretty level.  To make more level, I always put a linen towel over the cake when it comes out and push down with even pressure...this levels the cake.  Then leave the towel on for 10 mins and remove.  I rarely have to level a cake.

post #21 of 29

If I didn't use a heating core my bigger cakes would take too long to bake at a low temperature.  

post #22 of 29

You put the nail in the cake before you pour the batter make sure you grease it just as generiously as you do your pan. That being said I used it once and it was awful will never do it again all I ended up with was a cake with a big center (and I made sure I leveled that batter the best I could before putting it in the oven) you could no longer see the nail so I had to trim off the top around the nail then try try to flip it to get the nail out.... I like the heating cores I use them on anything 12 or over. If yours didn't come with directions lol don't forget to grease them good inside and out and put batter in the inside. I forgot once and the baking cake just pushed the core right out lol oops ...once the cake is baked just pop out the core put the small piece of cake back in my layer then level no trouble at all. I also make sure I soak my baking strips very well in ice water before wrapping the pans which I wrap right before I put them in the oven. Its not near as much work as it sounds once you get used to it and it makes for a very moist and evenly baked cake. and definatly drop your temp to 325. That's my two cents lol

post #23 of 29

I use the heating core nails in larger cakes - 12" and above.  I use the Ateco heat core nails because they don't rust, and are perfectly flat on the bottom.  They are so easy to use, I just do it, and have not tried to see how it would work without them. I just can't bring myself to risk throwing away all the  time effort and money wrapped up in these bigger cakes.   I also use the bake even strips with my pans that are not double walled  (love those, can't find them anymore).  Here is an 18" hex cake I made this week.   Prepare the pan with your cake release of choice. Place a parchment cut to fit in the bottom of the pan.  Poke holes where you want the nails to be.  Place the nails (pointed side up of course) under the parchment with the ends poking up through.  This holds them in place, and after baking, they are very easily removed because the base is outside the paper.  I don't bother to grease the nails, it really isn't necessary.   HTH.  

 

 

 

AppleMark

 

I'd rather be baking!
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post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by littlestruedel View Post

I don't use a heating core either, I used it once and it seemed like a pain in the butt. I also dont' use bakestrips. I was having some really uneven baking until I starting baking at 300 for 30 minutes (for large cakes) and 325 for the remaining time. Since this change I have barely had to level my cakes and they are cooked nice and evenly.
Thankyou, this was helpful and accurate
post #25 of 29

I always use bake even strips, and I use heat core nails for cakes 12" and up.  Put the heat core nails in the pan after applying your cake release. (I like the ateco heat core nails.  They are flat on the bottom and don't rust. )  put a parchment liner on the bottom with the nails poking through.  pour in your batter.   For a larger cake (12" and above)  I lower the oven to 310 degrees, convection.  When the cake is done, and you flip it onto a cooling rack, it is easy to remove the nails because they are outside of the parchment.  Here is an 18"  chocolate hex cake I did a few days ago.  Level, and perfectly baked throughout.  It also helps to have a great recipe.  It is possible that the heat core nails don't really make a difference, but why take a chance with all those expensive ingredients!

 

 

 

 

AppleMark

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I'd rather be baking!
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post #26 of 29

If you don't have a heating core, you can substitute several greased and inverted flower nails.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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post #27 of 29

I made a 10" round this weekend and did not use a heating core or flower nails (don't own either one) and my cake turned out perfect (baked at 325 instead of 350 too).

If the question involves chocolate, the answer in most cases is YES!

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If the question involves chocolate, the answer in most cases is YES!

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post #28 of 29
I tried using the nails once to see what all the fuss was about. Ditto a heating core. IMO, its just unnecessary silliness that overcomplicates getting the cake out of the pan. But I've only got 50 years of experience. . .
Answers to the most often asked questions re: SPS. SPS instructions are on Page 15 of the Sticky at the top of the Cake Decorating Forum. Supplies can be ordered from Oasis Supply, Global or BakeryCrafts.
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Answers to the most often asked questions re: SPS. SPS instructions are on Page 15 of the Sticky at the top of the Cake Decorating Forum. Supplies can be ordered from Oasis Supply, Global or BakeryCrafts.
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post #29 of 29

Does the 30 minutes at 300 and the rest at 325 method work for deep pans?  I need to bake a 12" cake and a 14" cake, both in 3" deep pans.

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