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2012 Wilton yearbook cover cake, ice cream cone level?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I love this cake! I want to pull this level off on a cake I will be working on in a few weeks. I looked at the article, but it left me confused. How are these cones done?
thanks!

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post #2 of 15
Are you sure these aren't some plastic separators that Wilton wants to sell you? I'd look in the catalog section of the yearbook to see.
Marianna
"I know my own mind...and it's around here somewhere!"
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Marianna
"I know my own mind...and it's around here somewhere!"
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post #3 of 15
I don't know, those look like real cones to me. I would think they'd have plastic pillars running down the center of each cone maybe.
~Lisa~

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~Lisa~

Check out my blog!!
http://sugarcelebrations.blogspot.com/
or visit me at Sugar Celebrations on facebook!
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post #4 of 15
Brandyf817, I am in agreement with you. They did NOT give actual instructions for that particular element of the cake. I am reasonably sure that the cone is an actual ice cream cone that has a pillar running through it to hold up the top plate. I am thinking the "hidden pillars". How they made the "ice cream" part?? I am stumped on that one. Might be the globe pillar set with fondant wrapped around.
Ginny
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Ginny
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post #5 of 15
I just got the yearbook yesterday. There were instructions in the back of the book for how they made the ice cream cones. Real cones hollowed out for the supports to go thru and the other ones were filled 1/2 way with chocolate to give it some weight. The tops were those round ball cake separators covered with fondant to look like ice cream. Love this cake. Can't wait to try it.
post #6 of 15
Well, okay, forgive me then for my cynical approach to the Wilton yearbook. It just seems like they're always more ready to sell you something ready-made from plastic or silicon than they are to get you to create things of your own. I'm really glad to see that this is something that you can make, although of course you need the ball separators. Do you suppose you could substitute styrofoam balls the same size?
Marianna
"I know my own mind...and it's around here somewhere!"
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Marianna
"I know my own mind...and it's around here somewhere!"
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post #7 of 15

I'm making this cake for my grand daughter's bday but cannot find the globes for the ice cream cones  at our local craft stores and don't have time to order them..can I use styrofoam balls? Will it hold the weight?  Hope someone answers..I know this thread is a bit old..

post #8 of 15
I just made this cake for a St Patricks day party and I can say it was the globe pillars for the cones I used. I also used 2 sets for a total of 8 cones and I wanted the extra support because the cake was super heavy. I just popped them into the decorator preferred plate and marked for the "dummy" supports that didn't pop in so when I set the second tier up it just fit perfectly. I used piping gel to glue the fondant to the globes and cones it worked out great. And the second tier with the lollipops calls for the crystal twist pillars. The book says to wrap the top 5 inches in fondant but I filled mine with little bubble gum sprinkles and it just worked perfect.

Here's the link for my copy

http://cakecentral.com/g/i/2954797/wilton-2012-yearbook-copy-candy-land-cake/
Edited by fattiecakes - 3/18/13 at 11:48pm
post #9 of 15

@fattiecakes:  "and I wanted the extra support because the cake was super heavy. I just popped them into the decorator preferred plate and marked for the "dummy" supports that didn't pop in so when I set the second tier up it just fit perfectly."        Please explain....for some reason, I'm confused..sorryicon_eek.gif

post #10 of 15

btw, it's better than the original Wilton!!

post #11 of 15
Lol, thanks so much for the compliment it was a scary endeavor! I made the cones by slicing just the bottom edges off off the cones and scoring the inside support of the cone and I kind of worked them out as gently as possible. Once I had those ready (8 good ones) I took two sets of the 2 1/2" globes and used piping gel painted on with a brush to cover the ball and then stretched the fondant gingerly around it trimming around the very bottom. Then I took the 9 1/2" pillar and pushed it through the top of the globe to get a clean edge and then I slowly worked it into the cone and glued the cone to the fondant covered ball with piping gel. And after I got that set up I stood them up on a cake separator plate with the feet facing up. After all 8 dried I trimmed the edges with fondant to make them look like a scoop smushed down on the cone.

For the assembly I marked my cake with the feet of the cake separator and then because I was afraid if just turning the plate and marking it again I measured where my first marks layed from the edge and marked four additional places in between the first four. I trimmed the fondant with a knife so when I poked the pillars in they wouldn't crack it and pushed all eight pillars in place. I let them sit until I assembled the cake at the party.

I did not do any fake cones or fill them with chocolate because the cake I made was a 14, 12, 10 and with the giant cupcake I wanted all the support I could get for that bottom tier. In fact besides my tiers being smaller sizes I went mostly by the book but I do believe it called for 2 sets of the 2 1/2" globe pillars anyway. And my customer was more than happy to return all my equipment because I charge a deposit for them.

Hope this helps, it was a great learning experience for me and I have a great game plan for it on the next go round.
post #12 of 15

@fattiecakes..yes, it does..I cannot find the globe or crystal pillars here and didn't have time to order them so I am using styrofoam balls and plastic white hollow dowels..any suggestions...any.. thanks a lot!icon_biggrin.gif

post #13 of 15
I would do the same, but use the same steps for the cones and to dress up the plain pillars in place of the crystal twist pillars I would cover the top 5 inches in white fondant like the book says let it dry and then make a few lollipops without sticks to stick to them as filler to cover before I put all the rest on.
post #14 of 15

..thank you sooooo much! thumbs_up.gif       I'm some kind of nervous!!icon_surprised.gif

post #15 of 15

@fattiecakes..how much did you charge for the cake?icon_biggrin.gif

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