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post #16 of 47
I'm with Leah, though I usually use Hero Compounds as they are easily available in my area and shipping is a b!tch (Alaska). For more flavors you can always use the syrups intended to flavor coffees.
post #17 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Angelfoodcake

Thank you very much,I am taking notes of your advices.I will be trying the recipies they look delicious!
Jen, this is the recipe I use:
4 cups sifted cake flour
2 cup sugar
4 eggs
1 cup unsalted butter
1 1/3 cup milk
4 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
I mix the dry ingredients butter and some of the liquid.Then I add the remaining liquid in two parts.Bake 350 F for 30-40 minutes.
Now when I try to make pineapple or peach cake,I add 1 1/3 cup of fruit pure instead of the milk.And I decrease the baking powder to 1 teaspoon and I add 1 teaspoon baking soda.
With all that fruit pure the cake still comes out with very little fruit flavor and so crumbly it just falls apart.Next time I will be adding extracts to help in the flavor.
Thank you to you all! icon_smile.gif



First, all the flavor is in the pulp of fruit, not the juice, so if you want more real fruit and flavor without adding extracts try freezing your fruit then let it come back to room temperature in a sieve. It's the DIY way to make your fruit more concentrated. The water in the fruit crystalizes when frozen and drains out when it melts, leaving the natural sugars and flavors behind in the pulp. I've never tried it with pineapple or peaches but I assume it works the same (with fresh fruit - not canned, I don't know which you are using). Although, pineapple is a hard one since its so much water, I know people add it to carrot cake and various fruit cakes to make them more moist but you can't taste pineapple when they are done. Pineapple is also all acid so that might also be really tricky.

Next I would not have decreased the baking powder, I just would have added about 1/4 tsp of baking soda (my rule of thumb is 1/8 tsp baking soda to 2 tsp baking powder). That small amount should neutralize the acid in the fruit but it's not enough to replace levening you get from baking powder.

Jen
post #18 of 47
FromScratch, Olive Nation is pure flavor. I probably dumped a tablespoon in the Key Lime cake I created last week. I could have never put enough juice in to get it that intense. (I used juice too). The lemon is great, and the strawberry and raspberry I use constantly. You know how McCormack's pure extracts still taste like a chemical? You can put a drop of these on your tongue and it is pure, intense taste.
post #19 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

Quote:
Originally Posted by Angelfoodcake

Thank you very much,I am taking notes of your advices.I will be trying the recipies they look delicious!
Jen, this is the recipe I use:
4 cups sifted cake flour
2 cup sugar
4 eggs
1 cup unsalted butter
1 1/3 cup milk
4 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
I mix the dry ingredients butter and some of the liquid.Then I add the remaining liquid in two parts.Bake 350 F for 30-40 minutes.
Now when I try to make pineapple or peach cake,I add 1 1/3 cup of fruit pure instead of the milk.And I decrease the baking powder to 1 teaspoon and I add 1 teaspoon baking soda.
With all that fruit pure the cake still comes out with very little fruit flavor and so crumbly it just falls apart.Next time I will be adding extracts to help in the flavor.
Thank you to you all! icon_smile.gif



First, all the flavor is in the pulp of fruit, not the juice, so if you want more real fruit and flavor without adding extracts try freezing your fruit then let it come back to room temperature in a sieve. It's the DIY way to make your fruit more concentrated. The water in the fruit crystalizes when frozen and drains out when it melts, leaving the natural sugars and flavors behind in the pulp. I've never tried it with pineapple or peaches but I assume it works the same (with fresh fruit - not canned, I don't know which you are using). Although, pineapple is a hard one since its so much water, I know people add it to carrot cake and various fruit cakes to make them more moist but you can't taste pineapple when they are done. Pineapple is also all acid so that might also be really tricky.

Next I would not have decreased the baking powder, I just would have added about 1/4 tsp of baking soda (my rule of thumb is 1/8 tsp baking soda to 2 tsp baking powder). That small amount should neutralize the acid in the fruit but it's not enough to replace levening you get from baking powder.

Jen



Thank you very much Jen ,I will try doing that!
And thanks to you all for your tips icon_biggrin.gif
post #20 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagenthatnj

Quote:
Originally Posted by southerncross

Angelfoodcake, I had the same problem finding a scratch strawbeerry cake for a special order I have next week. i finally found it on SmittenKitchen http://smittenkitchen.com/2008/10/pink-lady-cake/ I made a test cake this week and it's fabulous. As soon as my kitchen calms down (lots of orders...odd for the deep heat of summer) I'm going to try the recipe with peaches.



The pink lady cake is originally from one of my favorite books, Sky High.

http://smittenkitchen.com/2008/10/pink-lady-cake/

And in that book there's also a peach melba cake that I love:

http://pieceofcakeblog.blogspot.com/2009/08/whipped-cream.html




I am glad you wrote about the recipes from Sky High. I made the Pina colada cake from Sky High and it turned out great but I have been afraid of trying out other recipes because I read a few reviews that said the cakes turn out dry. Do the peach melba cake and the pink lady cake remain moist for a few days? I decorate my cakes over a couple of days so I want to make sure that they stay moist.
post #21 of 47
Unfortunately, I've given away the cakes a day or two after I've baked them. I'm a hobby baker and if I don't want to pay Weight Watchers, I have to make them disappear.

Never had a dry cake from that book. But there are a lot of factors that go into the baking of a cake, including ovens, pans and how well you mix them and baking time, as we all know. When I bought the book a few years ago, I did so because there was a group of bakers: The Cake Slice Bakers, all with blogs, baking from that book for a whole year. They went pretty much through all the recipes. I couldn't get in (it was like a secret society, lol...) so I decided I would follow along. Nobody had to know.

Most of my favorite cakes come from that book. The piña colada, the pink lady, the buttermilk vanilla cake, the chocolate one (the one with oil), the peach, and especially the blueberry lemon are my favorites.

The piña colada cake is even better a few days later. I let that one stay a day or two in the refrigerator before I give it away.

Unfortunately, the Cake Slice Bakers blog is gone, I think, but a few bloggers remain. Maybe you can ask them.


http://foodlibrarian.blogspot.com/2009/03/sky-high-cakes-triple-lemon-chiffon.html

http://lickthebowlgood.blogspot.com/2010/07/request-year-in-making.html

http://awhiskandaspoon.com/2009/07/20/the-cake-slice-marbled-lemon-blueberry-butter-cake/

http://awhiskandaspoon.com/2010/05/20/tcs-lemon-poppy-seed-cake-with-almond-cream-cheese-frosting/

http://smittenkitchen.com/2008/08/chocolate-peanut-butter-cake/

http://sweetapolita.com/2010/10/sky-high-hummingbird-cake/

http://www.crumblycookie.net/2009/06/08/strawberry-cake/
post #22 of 47
Thank you so much for your reply! I will check out those links. Since I started decorating cakes the scratch recipes that I used to use don't work anymore since they start to dry out after a day. I think I will begin trying out the recipes you suggested, they sound really good.
post #23 of 47
A note on dry cakes. Because scratch cakes dont have the added emulsions that box mixes do, it's a good idea to brush the cake layers with simple syrup (plain or flavoured). It really does make a difference.
No license or insurance. Put lead wires in cakes, never wash hands, cake boards are used cardboard. No contracts cause I can't read or write. No lawyer cause I'm judgment proof. I bake with old mix boxes found behind Walmart. Now about my question
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No license or insurance. Put lead wires in cakes, never wash hands, cake boards are used cardboard. No contracts cause I can't read or write. No lawyer cause I'm judgment proof. I bake with old mix boxes found behind Walmart. Now about my question
Reply
post #24 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by southerncross

A note on dry cakes. Because scratch cakes dont have the added emulsions that box mixes do, it's a good idea to brush the cake layers with simple syrup (plain or flavoured). It really does make a difference.



A scratch cake is not the only way to have a dry cake. I have tasted some very dry box mixes in my lifetime. It is the way it is prepared and the recipe that will make it dry. If you do use syrup, put it on hot out of the oven. It will help with the absorption.
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post #25 of 47
I must disagree that a scratch cake needs simple syrup to stay moist. I only use syrups to add an additional depth of flavor to a few of my cakes, including the liqueur and spirits cakes. The only simple syrup recipe I use involves infusing the syrup with coconut. My cakes are so moist that I can keep them in the refrigerator, and days later, they are still incredibly moist. My Key Lime cake glistens more than a box mix. I grew up eating moist cakes and I have developed most recipes around this style. But I do have some light and airy ones too.

Cordelia, in Sky High Cakes, The sour cream chocolate cake on p.62 is very moist. I used Guittard DP cocoa powder. I did use about 2 tbsp vanilla bean paste.
post #26 of 47
Agreed on the sour cream chocolate cake. It is so moist that if I ever was going to make cake balls the truffle way, I decided that would be the one I would use. It's also the easiest to mix. Scp1127, thank you, I think I'll use the guittard cocoa powder next time. It's my boyfriend's and my godson's favorite chocolate cake. I don't like chocolate much so I can't go crazy about that cake, but they certainly love it.
post #27 of 47
Imagenthatnj, I always disliked chocolate until I started making it and used premium chocolates and cocoa powder. I made a variation of the peanut butter and ganache topped cake that is featured with that recipe and it was incredible. We usually throw away a test cake after a few servings, but my adult kids and husband ate every piece. I found that recipe with two other variations and made some of my own changes. Alice's Tea Cup adapted it and there is a place on the web that posted a similar recipe with 125 pages (not a typo, 125 pages!) of raving comments.
post #28 of 47
I would love to see a link for the one with 125 pages of rave reviews. I don't have time to go searching myself. Thanks!
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post #29 of 47
Wow, thanks everyone for the pointers! I am not a big fan of chocolate either but now I guess I will have to try that choco sour cream cakeicon_smile.gif scp1127, have you tried any of the vanilla or fruit cakes from sky high?
post #30 of 47
Thanks, scp1127. I have the Alice's Tea Cup book in my wish list (I love scones and I think they have a few in the book). Someone told me that they adapted the lemon blueberry cake from Sky High too and I was curious to see what they did to it and how is it different.

So I'll get the book. Thanks. Could you tell me if there's that lemon blueberry cake in the Alice book?
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