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Bottom side up??

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I have been researching for the cake I plan to make, and several websites mention putting the first layer of a cake "bottom side up" before frosting or adding filling...

Why would you do this? Are there any compelling reasons TO do it, or not to?

Thanks!
post #2 of 12
It is usually level. And you don't have a cut side to ice... less crumbs.
post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by scp1127

It is usually level. And you don't have a cut side to ice... less crumbs.



Any down side to this technique?
post #4 of 12
No, it's standard.
post #5 of 12
That's the way I have always done it, for the above posted reasons.
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post #6 of 12
I never ice any cake upside down. You won't get crumbs when icing the "skin" surface... you're more likely to lift crumbs from the bottom and sides. Also, if the top is domed (and not cut off), when you flip it upside down your cake can crack in half.

If you have a need to routinely slice off the top surface, of course it would be more difficult to ice the loose crumb top than it would be to ice the bottom.
post #7 of 12
Personally I love bottom side up. I am still a new baker, and I think it helps me get the best overall look with the cake. If my cake domes while cooking, I can cut the dome off, and flip it, so that I still have a perfect surface for the top of the cake. I've also been told to 'crumb coat' a cake before icing & decorating, to prevent having the issues of loose crumbs, although to be honest I haven't tried this method yet. Good luck! icon_smile.gif
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWR41

I never ice any cake upside down. You won't get crumbs when icing the "skin" surface... you're more likely to lift crumbs from the bottom and sides. Also, if the top is domed (and not cut off), when you flip it upside down your cake can crack in half.



Does this mean that you dont level your cakes?? Whenever I remove my cake from the pan I let it cool for 5-10 min. then knock the sides of the pan on the counter all around to loosen the cake, then flip the cake onto a plate then I put the cooling rack on the bottom side of the cake (which is now facing up) and flip it one more time, this eliminates the risk of the cake cracking in half.
post #9 of 12
I have iced cakes both ways. What I do is...I spray my pan with non-stick spray and line bottom and sides with parchment paper. Pour batter in pan and tap pan on flat surface to remove any bubbles. Bake larger cakes at 325 degrees and remove from oven when skewer inserted in center comes out with only a few crumbs on it. Using a clean tea towel press lightly on the top of the cake to level as soon as you take it out of the oven. Let cool in pan for 10 minutes then remove from pan to a cooling rack. When completely cool, you are ready to crumb-coat. Let the crumb-coat set up for a few minutes (if you are using a crusting buttercream let it develop its crust) and then put on you final layer of icing.
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaykaymay

Does this mean that you dont level your cakes??



If they don't bake up level, I use the push-down method.

At the high-production facility, none of the cakes were ever leveled... for the most part they were baked level anyway, but it was the icer's job to ice them level regardless how they looked from the oven.
post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 
Wow, informative! I had never heard of this until a few days ago. I was imagining the cake cracking as well, if it was not level on top and then the top side was placed downward facing. I am so nervous about this cake because I have always focused on cake taste before and never really on appearance. I have made layer cakes and have had the top layer "slide" on me in the past and I never knew anything about leveling or flower nails or whatever. But with this cake I really can't screw up, and so I want to make sure I do it all correctly step by step!
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by crisseyann

That's the way I have always done it....

... since the beginning of time; since my mom first let us 'help' with cakes. I never knew there was any other option. It just made sense.
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