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Been trying scratch recipes all week... - Page 5

post #61 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Sugar_Fairy

Well... I'm feeling really badly about myself lately (as a baker... like I'm not a 'real' baker or experienced enough because I thought about using pudding in a scratch cake).
I thank all of you that gave encouragement and good advice. I've decided not to post in these forums anymore. It's not worth it to me when I feel like this after. icon_sad.gif




Oh please don't feel that way..Don't leave the forum or stop posting. I mean, this is a public internet forum/discussion board. Undoubtedly, we will come across comments or post that may upset us, piss us off or make us feel maybe even a little sad or inadequate at times but try not to take it personally. At the end of the day, we don't know each other personally and sooo many things like tone, true meaning and emotion get lost in translation over the internet. I don't think she meant any harm in her feelings against using pudding. Just walk away, let it go and join us again. icon_smile.gif
Greetings fellow CAKELINGS. I come in peace.
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Greetings fellow CAKELINGS. I come in peace.
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post #62 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marianna46



FromScratchSF, thanks so much for the toothpick tip. I always leave my cakes in the oven till the toothpick is dry. No wonder I can't find a cake that's moist enough! I make the Shubox Cafe's Decadently Moist White Cake the other day and, not only did it come out dryish (though delicious!), it turned light brown inside. Do you suppose I overbaked it?



thumbs_up.gif Found this out last summer when trying yellow cake recipes. First couple I tried were quite dry and then came across a recipe where the directions emphasized that if the toothpick came out absolutely clean (not wet but with crumbs) then the cake was already overbaked. Makes sense--just like eggs, cook scrambled eggs until they are dry--they are already overdone.
post #63 of 123
This seems to be the post that has upset so many



Quote:
Originally Posted by scp1127

When you add artificial pudding, isn't that defeating the purpose of making a scratch cake? It is a completely artificial product designed like a cake mix... both have so many chemicals added for the purpose of a good result no matter how badly they were made. That is why you can add anything to a cake mix. Adding things to scratch cakes will throw off the balance in most cases unless you know how to adjust it. If you want to learn scratch baking, read these four pages of posts of very experienced bakers and follow what is suggested.




I'm confused by it I went back and reread the OP and I still thought scp's post had jumped from another thread because it (to me at least) has completely missed the point of the original query. Be charitable guys and assume it was an honest mistake not nastiness sugars reply made it clear she was upset by it and saw it as an attack so can we just apologise and move on. The Internet removes tone and expression leaving only the words misunderstandings are going to happen because we all think differently and make assumptions about what is patently obvious (except of course one persons obvious is the next's blind spot).
Sorry I need to get off my hobbyhorse and let this thread get back on track.
post #64 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marianna46

Do you suppose I overbaked it?



I'm not familiar with that recipe, but I'd say yes, you probably overbaked it. The "put the toothpick in until it comes out clean" thing is a box cake thing. You can overbake those to practically burnt and they will still be "moist" after you cut off the burnt bits. Let me put it this way... cake is like meat. If you want a nice roast at medium rare, you have to pull it from the oven when the internal temp reaches 125 degrees and let it rest. As it rests it's still cooking... you know you've let it rest enough when the internal temperature reaches at least 130 degrees (nom nom). If you pull it at 130 degrees it'll be medium well by the time the internal temperature rises (not-so nom nom). Well, I apply that same principal to my cakes, only I use a toothpick instead of a meat thermometer. I set my timer 5 minutes before I think I should and check every 5 minutes until I go from wet batter on the toothpick to moist crumbs. You'll be amazed how quickly it'll go from one to the other. Then I pull my cake and re-set my timer for 10 minutes to let my cake "rest". At 10 minutes they get turned out onto the cooling rack and I do the freezer thing. I've never had a cake fall, and I try to do it as quickly as possible so I don't let too much heat out of the oven.

I respect people that can tell their cake is done by smell, but most of the time I'm baking 3-4 flavors right next to the tamale lady, the empanada truck and the garlic hummus guy... so I no longer trust my sense of smell. icon_biggrin.gif
post #65 of 123
Love empanadas!

Anyway, I pull my cakes out when the toothpick has moist crumbs, but I do still have trouble with the cake falling some in the middle from time to time. Am I pulling it out too early or being too rough with it? I also have cakes fall slightly from testing at times...?

ScratchSF, I found your blog a couple of weeks ago, and it helped renew my passion for baking. Thank you.
post #66 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bri122005

Love empanadas!

Anyway, I pull my cakes out when the toothpick has moist crumbs, but I do still have trouble with the cake falling some in the middle from time to time. Am I pulling it out too early or being too rough with it? I also have cakes fall slightly from testing at times...?

ScratchSF, I found your blog a couple of weeks ago, and it helped renew my passion for baking. Thank you.



Further clarification - my scratch cakes do flatten out a bit on top, and sometimes get a little crater in the middle where the dome deflated a bit. I chalk this up to too much batter in the pan. I tend to overfill so I can trim the top crust. I'd rather have a layer that is too tall then too short. A cake that actually "falls" looks like a balloon that is deflated. When you cut off the top do you have a uniform crumb or is it more dough-like in the center? If so, the real question is what recipe you used and did you mix properly to give the cake structure? All my butter cake recipes I have converted to the reverse creaming method. People think it has something to do with moistness but it really is to make sure you can mix the proper structure into your cake without overdeveloping the gluten. Reverse creaming coats the flour with the butter preventing the gluten from developing, thereby building structure without making your cake chewy. Meaning you can mix the heck out of it without fear.

Another question is what temperature are you baking your cakes? I'm a 325 gal no matter what the recipe says. Baking too fast can also be a problem.
post #67 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF


Further clarification - my scratch cakes do flatten out a bit on top, and . Reverse creaming coats the flour with the butter preventing the gluten from developing, thereby building structure without making your cake chewy. Meaning you can mix the heck out of it without fear.



I know Rose testifies to this as well however I have found it is possible to overmix via the reverse creaming method--and it was not that hard to do. That is I did not mix it for 10 minutes or forget about the batter.
post #68 of 123
I guess the little crater in the top is what I'm referring to as slightly falling. I don't have complete deflating, just the little golf ball size dip in the middle, especially in square pans. I use the reverse creaming method too, and normally cook at 325 (unless it's cupcakes - those I crank up to 375). I guess I can stop worrying about the slight falling? It doesn't seem to effect the taste; it just doesn't look as pretty coming out of the oven as I'd like.
post #69 of 123
I loved the cake I made using the reversed creaming method.
Do you think I can take any of my recipes and keep the amounts and ingredients, just switch from the typical creaming of butter and sugar to the reversed creaming?

That would be an interesting experiment. Has anyone tried that with SW's classic yellow cake? (made it with the reversed creaming method?)
Sofia
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Sofia
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post #70 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bri122005

I guess the little crater in the top is what I'm referring to as slightly falling. I don't have complete deflating, just the little golf ball size dip in the middle, especially in square pans. I use the reverse creaming method too, and normally cook at 325 (unless it's cupcakes - those I crank up to 375). I guess I can stop worrying about the slight falling? It doesn't seem to effect the taste; it just doesn't look as pretty coming out of the oven as I'd like.



As long as you level it off and the cake is moist and perfect, then you are doing it right! thumbs_up.gif
post #71 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marianna46


FromScratchSF, thanks so much for the toothpick tip. I always leave my cakes in the oven till the toothpick is dry. No wonder I can't find a cake that's moist enough! ?




OK.. maybe this is my problem, too. FromScratchSF - do you happen to have picture of what "moist crumbs" look like on a toothpick? and if so, could you post it?
post #72 of 123
Okay, y'all, I know I've read this somewhere, but I've forgotten: what is reverse creaming? Is it creaming the butter with the flour at the beginning instead of with the butter? I'll do anything to get better cakes, so I'd like to try it.

And thanks for this wealth of information, my CC friends - I wouldn't be anywhere without all of you!
Marianna
"I know my own mind...and it's around here somewhere!"
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Marianna
"I know my own mind...and it's around here somewhere!"
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post #73 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by bonniebakes

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marianna46


FromScratchSF, thanks so much for the toothpick tip. I always leave my cakes in the oven till the toothpick is dry. No wonder I can't find a cake that's moist enough! ?




OK.. maybe this is my problem, too. FromScratchSF - do you happen to have picture of what "moist crumbs" look like on a toothpick? and if so, could you post it?



I'm making a chocolate cake tonight so I'll try and snap some crappy phone pics icon_biggrin.gif
post #74 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Sugar_Fairy

Hi it's me again, the original poster... well today I tried Toba Garrett's recipe again (it's a pretty basic recipe - using buttermilk, and lots of creaming of the butter at the beginning), then I added one cup of prepared J-ELLO pudding (at the same time as the buttermilk). For some reason, the pudding makes it so the cake does not rise as well. It should have come out as a 2" cake, but it was 1" instead. I was VERY pleased with the flavour of the cake (no eggy taste - but then I let it cool for a couple hours before tasting it so maybe that's why). The density of the cake was a bit much though I think (a really 'tight' crumb, if that makes sense and really heavy). Sooooo, tomorrow, I'm going to try this recipe AGAIN, but with only a 1/2 cup of prepared pudding (and vanilla pudding instead - as I accidentally used lemon pudding today by mistake - so maybe that's why the flavour was so good, lol). I'll let you all know how it goes... so back to the drawing board - I do feel like I'm making progress though. icon_smile.gif



The thing about adding a box of pudding mix to a scratch cake has been kicked around a lot on this forum. And I could be wrong because I personally have never done it, but possibly you shouldn't be making the pudding before you put in the batter. Instead maybe you should mix it in unprepared with the dry and use it that way. I don't think I have ever read where it was mixed into pudding first. If the cake with the prepared pudding did not work, try it with the pudding mix dry and see what results you get.

Also if you are trying to use this idea you could do a search of the forums of people who say they do this to a scratch cake and then PM and ask if they prepare the pudding first.
I am no longer active on CC.  They will not let me delete my account.
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I am no longer active on CC.  They will not let me delete my account.
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post #75 of 123
I do raise chickens and they aren't allowed in the garden because they scratch the h*ll out of it.

Ba-dam-bam


Tami icon_lol.gif







.....................sometimes I just can't help myself.........................
Always put your eggs in one basket.......why do you want to carry two?
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Always put your eggs in one basket.......why do you want to carry two?
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