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Seperator plate question

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
When doing a cake with columns, should I put each cake on a foiled board, decorate and THEN put it on the seperator plate at the reception, or do I decorate it ON the plate without a cake board under it?
post #2 of 24
You need to put some type of cake board underneath so your separator plate does not get cut when the cake is cut. You can put the cakes on boards the same size and then on the separator plate.
post #3 of 24
This may sound bizzare but it works. I was taught to hot glue the cake (already on the same size cardboard) to the separator plate using non-string glue sticks. You can still remove the cardboard and glue from the plate once all is said and done. This is just and extra assurance the cake will not budge especially if your cake tiers are not directly sitting on one another.
hope this helps. It's worked for me numerous times.


Amy
post #4 of 24
I've never heard of non-string glue sticks. Where are you purchasing yours?
post #5 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by smiling1809

When doing a cake with columns, should I put each cake on a foiled board, decorate and THEN put it on the seperator plate at the reception, or do I decorate it ON the plate without a cake board under it?



f I make an 8" cake for instance, I put it on an 8" grease proof cake board..just use a little icing to make it stick to the board. The I put that on top of a 10" separtor plate..again, I just put use a little icing to make the board stick to the separator plate. Then I decorate the cake. To transport that same cake..I take a 12"cake board and press the feet of the separator plate into that and put everything in the 12" box to go. It keeps the decorated cake from touching the sides of the box or getting messed up!
Whatever you do, do with all your heart!
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Whatever you do, do with all your heart!
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post #6 of 24
My first instructor taught us to use large egg trays (turned upside down- I think they hold 30 eggs) to transport stacked cakes. I've only done it a few times but it works. She even gave one to a customer like this and he took it on a ferry ride to an island where the reception was being held. The totally constructed, stacked cake made the journey unharmed.
post #7 of 24
I've bought the gluesticks at Michaels! They might actually be non or low string glue sticks. I haven't bought them in a year or so. Just ask at the store, they have to make them because I've used them.

BTW, I love all the info you (Cali4dawn) have to offer on these forums!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! thumbs_up.gif
post #8 of 24
Thank you, cakemommy. I also receive a lot of great information. We just need to keep passing it on.
post #9 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by cali4dawn

My first instructor taught us to use large egg trays (turned upside down- I think they hold 30 eggs) to transport stacked cakes.



Sounds like a great idea, as long as it fits in a box! I'm kinda of funny about transporting a cak (or any food for that matter) unless it is covered or in a box.
Whatever you do, do with all your heart!
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Whatever you do, do with all your heart!
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post #10 of 24
I'm all about boxes myself... and not even to keep the cake from knocking in to things... It's those flying fuzzies.... yuck!!
post #11 of 24
Back to placing the cakes directly on separator plates, this can be done and cutting the cake doesn't mark them up either, you have to cut awfully hard to cut them. I do it both ways, depending on the cake and where it is going and how it will be used. The one drawback is that because of the feet, they take up space so when figuring on the depth of your cake you also have to worry about the legs when calculating the depth of the box. The advantage to using the extra boards is that the leftover cake or saved tiers don't interfere with you getting these separator plates back promptly. The advantage to just using the separator plates is that they are much more stable than cardboard so you don't have to worry about doubling up the boards so that they don't cause any cracking of the icing when the boarded cake is being moved around. But actually the separator plates were originally designed for direct use.
I have never seen the low string glue either, low temperature and dual temperature yes, but low string never. I will have to shop for that, it sounds like a good idea and maybe I can put my hairblower away and stop using it to get rid of the glue threads!
Hugs Squirrelly Cakes
post #12 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by SquirrellyCakes


I have never seen the low string glue either, low temperature and dual temperature yes, but low string never. I will have to shop for that, it sounds like a good idea and maybe I can put my hairblower away and stop using it to get rid of the glue threads!
Hugs Squirrelly Cakes



I'm confused. What are the glue sticks for?

Michelle
post #13 of 24
Haha Michelle, hard to follow this thread? The glue gun sticks are for gluing the cake boards to the separator plates so that they don't slide. Some folks use a dab of icing instead, others use sticky tape. Some folks feel that using a glue gun with damage your separator plate, but most of the time, it comes off clean and quite easily.
Hugs Squirrelly Cakes
post #14 of 24
Hahaha!!! I use icing to glue my cake boards down. I wanted to know about them for other crafts.
post #15 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by cali4dawn

Hahaha!!! I use icing to glue my cake boards down. I wanted to know about them for other crafts.


Haha, me too! I have never heard of it before. I thought I was doing good having low temp and mixed temp and mini and regular glue guns, but I like this no strings idea!
Hugs Squirrelly Cakes
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