Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cake Decorating › Cake to serve 40
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Cake to serve 40

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
I've been asked to make a cake to serve 40 people for a child's birthday party. I've always had problems estimating serving sizes, even using charts (I usually go by Earline's cake serving chart). She was thinking a double layer 9 inch round topped with a double layer 6 inch. I'm thinking that's not going to be enough to serve 40. Is it? If not, what would be a better size? And she is wanting round cakes. I'd rather there be to much than not enough. Thansk a lot in advance. One day I'll get the servings down...
post #2 of 9
Sounds perfect (44 servings).
http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm
post #3 of 9
Honestly, I'd go with a double layer 7in and a double layer 10in. The chart above is for wedding cake slices, which are a tad bit smaller than party cake slices.
post #4 of 9
A double layer 7" and double layer 9" provides 40 servings according to the party chart.

A double layer 6" and double layer 10" serves 40 as well.

The suggestion above 7" and 10" serves 44.

http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-party-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

This is a great website to use http://shinymetalobjects.net/cake/calculator/cake_calculator.cgi
post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by amanduhleigh

Honestly, I'd go with a double layer 7in and a double layer 10in. The chart above is for wedding cake slices, which are a tad bit smaller than party cake slices.



This also means that if she charges per serving, she'll need to bill the client for 56 servings. (18 servings in 7" and 38 servings in 10")

Just to clarify:
"Servings" are used in two ways--- 1) to determine cost and 2) to determine amount of cake to serve to guests.

1) Cost is based on the standard of 8 cubic inches of cake. This is the same as a Wilton wedding slice of 1" x 2" x 4". Or, for a sheet cake, 2 x 2 x 2. This cost does not change, no matter how much or how big a piece of cake the customer's guests desire.

This decision of cost per serving is determined by the caker. Some cakers may charge according to the size of the tier, without mentioning servings, but cost-per-serving is often how customers compare different cakers.

2) Size of pieces of cake to serve guests depends on who is cutting or eating the cake. This decision of how much cake to serve is determined by the customer.

To take an example to the extreme, one could cut a 10" tier into 2 Jethro-sized servings. However, the caker still charges for a 38 serving cake. If one's pricing is (just as an example) $3/ serving, will you bill the customer $6 or $114? If one uses an Earlene or Wilton Party chart, it's the same, just a smaller difference.

The problem comes about when cakers start to confuse 1) and 2) and begin to adjust 1), depending on 2).

The most appropriate size of a piece of cake to serve guests is subjective, and only the customer knows how much cake their guests will want. We have to educate them about the difference between our pricing and their size of a piece.

It's probably best to say something like: "You have a couple options. I could make a 7" & 9" which would give you 50 servings, and would cost $150. However, the cake industry pricing is based on a standard serving size that's about the size of a folded-over peanut butter sandwich [IndyDebi reference]. If you want to cut and serve larger pieces than that, I recommend that you consider an 8" & 10", which has 62 standard servings, and would cost $186. Which one would you like?"

Some cakers here have styrofoam, wood, or cardboard models of different-sized cake slices to show to customers, so they can visualize.

An alternative to thinking about this issue in terms of 2 decisions is to simply price your piece of cake higher. For instance, if you always follow Earlene's chart, your price per slice will be higher. The disadvantage to that strategy is that customers don't often know (or care) about the differences between Wilton wedding, Earlene, or party servings. Customers will compare your price per serving (say, an Earlene serving, which is $3.20, as a random example) with other cakers' prices based on the standard Wilton wedding slice serving of $3. They may think you are more expensive.

A final problem can come when the person cutting the cake doesn't know how big the customer wanted the servings. That's where cutting guides, taped to your cake box really help. Most every venue or caterer knows the standard Wilton wedding slice size, so that's how they'll cut it, unless instructed differently.

I know this is a LONG email. However, this issue comes up in a thread every other day, and cakers still have problems.
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by LisaPeps

A double layer 7" and double layer 9" provides 40 servings according to the party chart.

A double layer 6" and double layer 10" serves 40 as well.

The suggestion above 7" and 10" serves 44.

http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-party-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

This is a great website to use http://shinymetalobjects.net/cake/calculator/cake_calculator.cgi



Just to clarify: LisaPeps is using the "party-sized" serving charts, and I use the standard wedding-sized charts. That's why we are citing different numbers of servings.

Note: If we both charge $3 per serving, who will make more money?
post #7 of 9
Something else I"ve heard is to set your servings per cake and then give your customers a sheet on how to cut the cake to maximize the servings. That way, you hold up your end of the bargain and they can cut it however they like.

I'm setting my standard (which is also industry standard from what I understand) at 1x2x4. It's big enough. People don't have only cake at parties or weddings so it's enough cake. And if the customer wants more, they order more. Plain and simple.
Had my blog listed and then realized one day that all you could see was "misadventuresofanal..." Took that sucker right off.
Reply
Had my blog listed and then realized one day that all you could see was "misadventuresofanal..." Took that sucker right off.
Reply
post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawncr

Quote:
Originally Posted by LisaPeps

A double layer 7" and double layer 9" provides 40 servings according to the party chart.

A double layer 6" and double layer 10" serves 40 as well.

The suggestion above 7" and 10" serves 44.

http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-party-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

This is a great website to use http://shinymetalobjects.net/cake/calculator/cake_calculator.cgi



Just to clarify: LisaPeps is using the "party-sized" serving charts, and I use the standard wedding-sized charts. That's why we are citing different
numbers of servings

Note: If we both charge $3 per serving, who will make more money?



I posted this in reference to the previous poster mentioning the difference in party sized servings. It's up to the caker whether they have different sizes for party vs wedding, that's why I linked to the servings calculator website too. In the UK we charge by the size of cake not the number of servings.
post #9 of 9
LisaPeps, your second link will be very helpful to many CC members. Thanks for posting it! thumbs_up.gif
Respect for ourselves guides our morals; respect for others guides our manners.
Reply
Respect for ourselves guides our morals; respect for others guides our manners.
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cake Decorating
Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cake Decorating › Cake to serve 40