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Ruffles on Wedding Cake

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Hi All,
I need to make a wedding cake that requires ruffles cascading down sides of the bottom layer.

I can use a gum paste and fondant mix, but the ruffles turn out pretty stiff and crunchy. I was wondering if anyone has tried mixing fondant and modeling chocolate together to get a ruffle that is not so hard/crunchy, but is more on the soft side and will stand up. I will be propping them up with pins while they dry.

Next question is if I do use modeling chocolate, what white chocolate is best and what recipe. I have Ghirardelli white chocolate chips in a bag but not sure if that will work.

If not modeling chocolate (using real chocolate) then what about Wilton Candy Melts I think they call it candy clay.

Not sure what would mix best with the fondant.

Any help and recipes would be appreciated.

Thanks
post #2 of 16
Do you have a picture of the effect you are trying to achieve?

deborahanne

http://grandmasugarskitchen.blogspot.com/
http://fromlinetocolor.blogspot.ca/

Life begins at 325° F, and, yes, that IS powdered sugar in my hair.

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deborahanne

http://grandmasugarskitchen.blogspot.com/
http://fromlinetocolor.blogspot.ca/

Life begins at 325° F, and, yes, that IS powdered sugar in my hair.

Baby Shower
(6 photos)
Birthday Cakes
(6 photos)
Christmas
(6 photos)
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post #3 of 16
Could you use a royal icing or a buttercream on the fondant and do something like this, if this is the look you're going for?

http://sweetapolita.com/2010/11/rich-ruffled-chocolate-celebration-cake/
post #4 of 16
Do you have a picture of the type of ruffle you're looking to make?

I recently wanted to make a cake inspired by a specific dress, but I couldn't find instructions anywhere about how to make vertical ruffles, so I kind of figured it out as I went along. http://cakecentral.com/gallery/2063739

The ruffles were made by cutting out pieces in varying widths and lengths, making one edge straight and the other with slight curve, and tapering the ends (kind of like a long, skinny capital "D"). The edges were softened using the back of a spoon over flower forming foam.

Keeping the straight edge flat on the counter, I formed and lifted the curved edges up, molding them into the shape of ruffle I was looking to achieve, then leaving to set for a little while. The modeling chocolate was great for this because it didn't flop back down and firmed up quickly.

The cake was covered in a thin sheet of chocolate and after the ruffles were dry, I attached the first one on an angle with the straight edge under the ruffled edge, then attached another ruffle close enough to cover the seam from the first and repeated all the way around using the different lenghts at varying heights on the cake. When placing a ruffle towards the top of the cake, I placed it so that about an inch of the ruffle could be folded down over the top of the cake, so that the ruffles started under the top tier.

The ruffles were attached to the cake using a paintbursh dipped in vodka.

There might be a better or easier way to do it, but this is the best I could figure out. This was the first time I used modeling chocolate and I loved it. Its so easy to work with, is very forgiving, has a very long shelf life and tastes so much better than fondant!

Good luck!
post #5 of 16
bebegirl1969, your cake is lovely. Where do you buy your modeling chocolate & is it called modeling chocolate? Thank you for posting those instructions.
June
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June
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post #6 of 16
bebegirl1969, love the cake! Thanks for explaining. I've never done anything with modeling chocolate & have been wanting too. You cake has made me determined to go for it!
Cleaning your house while the kids are still growing is like shoveling the walk while it's still snowing.
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Cleaning your house while the kids are still growing is like shoveling the walk while it's still snowing.
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post #7 of 16
TThe picture you posted is achieved with buttercream and a 103 tip. You hold the bag vertically right beside the cake and pipe in a zig zag as you climp upwards (like building a skinny column). If you google "ruffle cake tutorial" several links will pop up including some youtube videos.
yummmm...cake!
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yummmm...cake!
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post #8 of 16
modeling choc is great and so each to make!
make life what you want it to be
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make life what you want it to be
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post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by superstar

bebegirl1969, your cake is lovely. Where do you buy your modeling chocolate & is it called modeling chocolate? Thank you for posting those instructions.



Thanks, superstar! I used a 14 oz bag Wilton candy melts from Michael's craft store. It's very easy to make:

Put melts in microwave safe bowl and microwave on 50% power for 1 minute, then stir. Continue to heat and mix at 50% power for 25 second increments until all the wafers are melted and smooth.

Add 1/3 cup white corn syrup and carefully fold into the chocolate until incorporate and starts to pull away from the bowl, sort of like how dough would. Careful not to mix too much or it gets grainy.

Pour it out onto a sheet of wax paper and put it on the counter for a couple of hours. Dab it with a paper towel occasionally to absorb the extra wax. I've read that you should let it sit overnight, but I havent's had any problems with using it a couple hours after it hardens. Perhaps it would depend on the climate.

After the chocolate hardens and is at room temperature, break off manageable pieces and begin to smush and knead until it is smooth and pliable. Even though it might seem like it will never get there, keep at it. Sprinkle some cornstarch to keep it from sticking to the counter. When the first batch is pliable, go on and finish the rest, the knead it all together and you're done!

I like the modeling chocolate so much better than the mm fondant I use. It's much easier and less messy to make, tastes so much better, can be stored for a very long time and doesn't even need to be air-tight. It's also very more forgiving than fondant and marks and tears are easily fixed.

If you're working with it and it begins to melt or is losing its shape, just put it down or in the fridge for a few minutes and it's as good as new.

It can be colored the same as fondant--I use the Wilton gel colors--but if you want to make black, start with dark chocolate. I've noticed that if you have to add a lot of color, it does kind of break it down and make it a little tough to work with.

Hope this info is helpful!
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by SarahBeth3

bebegirl1969, love the cake! Thanks for explaining. I've never done anything with modeling chocolate & have been wanting too. You cake has made me determined to go for it!



Thanks, SaraBeth3! I say go for it! I would love to see what you create. icon_smile.gif

I was very nervous to try it at first because some of the online information I came across made it seem like it was the most difficult thing in the world to achieve! I read about the threat of the chocolate seizing if it wasn't done exactly right and promises that it would only work with only the finest chocolate and that wilton melts should absolutely, positively not be used. Bull! It was super easy to make and I received lots of compliments on the chocolate!

Good luck!
post #11 of 16
Thanks bebegirl1969, you give a very good explanation. I have tried making it before but it wasn't a great success. I will be trying it again using all your hints & tips..
June
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June
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post #12 of 16
Thanks so much for this. thumbs_up.gif
post #13 of 16
I did a tutorial for the horizontal ruffles on a cake. I did use fondant/modelling chocolate, it works well. http://acaketorememberva.blogspot.com/search?q=ruffle+cake
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

I did a tutorial for the horizontal ruffles on a cake. I did use fondant/modelling chocolate, it works well. http://acaketorememberva.blogspot.com/search?q=ruffle+cake

That is a great tutorial on horizontal frills. Thank you.
June
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June
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post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

I did a tutorial for the horizontal ruffles on a cake. I did use fondant/modelling chocolate, it works well. http://acaketorememberva.blogspot.com/search?q=ruffle+cake



That's great Costumeczar.. thank you! thumbs_up.gif
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