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Baking science folks! Effects of hi-ratio cake flour?! - Page 2

post #16 of 25
Thread Starter 
No idea why my post went across three times... icon_confused.gif
Sherri

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Sherri

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post #17 of 25
Thread Starter 
Again, not sure why this post came across three times... icon_confused.gif
Sherri

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Sherri

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post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by SugarFiend

Quote:
Originally Posted by gatorcake

Missed this thead the first time. As to the original question here is why it would impact your recipe.

Hi-ratio flour is used in cakes that have a high ratio of sugar and liquid to flour. Hi ratio flour is able to absorb more water, and thus it is able to absorb more sugar.

One way you can tell the impact of hi-ratio flour is that it can still produce thick case batters with high amounts of liquid and sugar. The batter would otherwise be thin and liquidy if the same amount of non-hi ratio flour was used.

In terms of the final product hi ratio cake recipes produce cakes that are light, moist and have a tender crumb. In addition they also have a higher volume which would explain the rise you saw in your original recipe.





That's interesting... Are you aware if recipes are written or adapted specifically for hi-ratio flour? The one I posted doesn't seem to have particularly high ratio of sugar or liquids to flour - but I don't have that science knowledge. I did notice my batter was quite thick, though.

Is hi-ratio cake flour better suited to a different mixing method than traditional creaming? Are higher liquid and sugar amounts better to use? Or would it be better to just cut back on the flour?

This has SO gotten my scientific brain working overtime. I MUST go out and get a baking science book or three. I've heard The Joy of Baking is pretty good - anyone else have other recommendations? Then again, is the topic of hi-ratio cake flours even covered?

Thanks to everyone for your input!



While I have not tried it, the answer to your question above is yes. Most professionals do not use the creaming method in the kitchen for cakes. It is too time consuming. Instead they use what used to be called the hi-ratio method, or it may still be called that. Anyway, it is like the reverse creaming method. It has been awhile since I read about it, but I believe it is in the book Professional Baking by Wayne Goselin. I may be off on the spelling of the last name.
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post #19 of 25
Also, the recipe you posted is considered a hi-ratio recipe. The weight of the sugar is higher than the weight of the flour by 132%. And it does call for cake flour.

I also use hi-ratio cake flour. I forgot about this discussion, or I would have posted it. I took a similar recipe and made by altering the eggs. First I used all egg yolks, then all egg whites, then the equivalent in weight of whole eggs. The one that exploded the most is the all egg white recipe, which I notice in your recipe. Egg whites have some awesome leavening power, which is how you get a light delicious angel food cake.

Switch out your eggs and see what happens.
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post #20 of 25
Thread Starter 
Thank you LindaF144a, I will go and try to find that book. And I'm glad to hear that recipe is hi-ratio, because it's my front-runner in my quest for a good white cake recipe. Not to mention the fact that I have 50 lbs. of hi-ratio flour to go through!

I'll also try switching the eggs, too. That's kinda funny, the two things I rarely have a shortage of in this house: cake flour and eggs. (My neighbor has chickens and brings me fresh eggs sometimes 2 or 3 dozen at a time.)

Hm, now if he'd just get a couple of cows! icon_rolleyes.gif
Sherri

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Sherri

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post #21 of 25
Fresh eggs will have even more leavening power. And it is advisable to weigh them seeing how you are probably getting all sorts of eggs in all sorts of different sizes. That could definitely be a factor, especially in a recipe with all egg whites.
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post #22 of 25
Thread Starter 
I didn't use the eggs he gives me for baking for the longest time for that very reason. Until the day I had that "DUH... weigh the eggs!" moment.
Sherri

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Sherri

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post #23 of 25
Hi-ratio flour can be used in recipes with a higher liquid content than for example, a sponge cake. As the grains of this flour are finer than usual flour, it allows for better absorption of liquids and so therefore if you are substituting it for biscuit/cake or bakers flour (larger grains, higher gluten content), you would naturally add more liquid to your recipe.
post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by janachu

Hi-ratio flour can be used in recipes with a higher liquid content than for example, a sponge cake. As the grains of this flour are finer than usual flour, it allows for better absorption of liquids and so therefore if you are substituting it for biscuit/cake or bakers flour (larger grains, higher gluten content), you would naturally add more liquid to your recipe.



Actually it has nothing to do with the finer grain and everything to do with the type of wheat used. It is made with a softer red winter wheat that has a lower protein count, a lower ash count and a higher starch count. And not all cake flours are alike. The Swans Down available at most grocery stores is a completely different puppy than the hi-ratio cake flour I get at the last remaining flour mill in my area. My neighbor is the general manager there and we have lots of fun talking flour at dinner parties.

The bleaching of the flour is what will allow for more liquid. This process increases the ability of the starch granules to absorb liquid. Most of the time it is a beach flour that will work with a hi-ratio cake recipe rather than an unbleached flour.

You cannot get bleached flour overseas. It is not allowed by law. So you may get a different flour with different results. I do remember someone on the internet having success with flour from overseas when she microwaved it first. But unfortunately I do not have a link. Maybe if you go to The Cake Bible site and look around there you may find a link somewhere.
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post #25 of 25
[/quote]
While I have not tried it, the answer to your question above is yes. Most professionals do not use the creaming method in the kitchen for cakes. It is too time consuming. Instead they use what used to be called the hi-ratio method, or it may still be called that. Anyway, it is like the reverse creaming method. It has been awhile since I read about it, but I believe it is in the book Professional Baking by Wayne Goselin. I may be off on the spelling of the last name.[/quote]

Funny, I just ordered that book from Amazon. Supposed to be getting it tomorrow, can't wait!
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0471783498
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