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Is disco dust edible?

post #1 of 40
Thread Starter 
Just bought some disco dust, cant wait to try it but I was wonderin, Is it edible?
Can I put it on fondant pieces that I will be applying right on the cake?
Anybody that has used it, I'd appreciate you thoughts!!!
icon_biggrin.gif
post #2 of 40
Not "edible" but "non-toxic." There's another post on this somewhere. I think everyone there was saying that disco dust is exactly the same as non-toxic craft glitter. It won't make you sick but your body probably won't digest it (or something like that).
post #3 of 40
It's fine grain plastic glitter and although non-toxic, it's not edible.

It should only be used on items that will be removed before eating.

Rae
I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
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I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
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post #4 of 40
I asked this last week and these are the responses I got....

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopicp-7098968-.html#7098968
post #5 of 40
don't put it on anything that is going to be eaten. i don't know what you could use to get truly edible sparkle. i just called Madame Chocolat in LA because they were on the food network and they have "Glitter truffles" i asked what the glitter was because obviously they wouldn't cover a truffle in disco dust! She told me that her supplier will not tell what the secret is but it's totally safe and edible
A compromise is the art of dividing a cake in such a way that everyone believes he has the biggest piece ~Ludwig Erhard
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A compromise is the art of dividing a cake in such a way that everyone believes he has the biggest piece ~Ludwig Erhard
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post #6 of 40
Yep, it comes up pretty much weekly.

The concept that lots of small plastic particles aren't harmful is an over-generalization.

People with diverticulitis or diverticulosis, Crohn's disease, IBS, etc. have to be very careful about consuming things that can stick in the creases of the intestinal lining--think strawberry seeds, kiwi seeds, nonpareils, etc.

Seeds don't digest easily and plastic doesn't digest at all. If those small things get stuck in that lining--even in a healthy person--serious infection can result.

Since fine plastic particles aren't something that the average person would even imagine would be on the food their eating, someone who is ordinarily very careful about their diet might be caught off guard.

Fact is, no one should have ever decided to put the stuff on food to begin with. Sometimes, "pretty" just isn't worth it.
Rae
I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
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I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
Reply
post #7 of 40
Besides everything else, disco dust is very disagreeable to eat. It tastes like nothing and is extremely gritty. I know this because I tried it on a piece of fondant before I used it on a cake, not knowing that it was supposed to be removed before you ate the cake. It was so disgusting I decided not to use it. Just as well, because I was going to put it on something that wasn't actually removable!
Marianna
"I know my own mind...and it's around here somewhere!"
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Marianna
"I know my own mind...and it's around here somewhere!"
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post #8 of 40
You know what really bugs me is when you see these top notch cake decorators on tv putting the stuff everywhere on a cake in places that you know are going to be eaten. One show I saw last week, showed the exact same disco I had purchased and it was used on pieces that were definitely going to be eaten unless the baker sent instructions to peel all of that off before eating the cake. They all seem to use it, so we think it must be ok. And I can't believe that they inform their clients that "Oh, by the way, you can't eat that sparkly stuff that's all over your cake!"

I do use it occasionally but I don't sell my cakes, they are for my family and they all know about the disco dust discussions that have been here on CC. If the information has been passed on as to what this stuff really is, well if it doesn't matter to you, what can I say? I know my kids have eaten and passed worse things than that while growing up, as I'm sure most of us have.

I definitely agree that people with certain ailments have to be careful about consuming things that may cause further problems for them. And for that very reason, my father who did have diverticulitus had to be careful with what he put into his body. He loved the cakes I made, but because he knew about the disco dust, he just "ate around it" if I had put some on that particular cake. If he ate somewhere other than at home, he was extra vigilant as to what he consumed, as I would assume most people with dietary ailments would be or at least should be.

It is very true, that this stuff should have never been put out there in the first place if it wasn't considered food safe. However it is there and some will decide to use it and some won't. I guess if the proper warnings are presented, then it's up to us as individuals to decide what lines to step across where our health is concerned and then face the possible consequences as a result. Just my humble opinion.... icon_smile.gif
post #9 of 40
and yet poisonous aspartame is rampantly consumed icon_rolleyes.gificon_rolleyes.gificon_rolleyes.gif
AKA: bonjovibabe
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AKA: bonjovibabe
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post #10 of 40
Aspartame controversy
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The artificial sweetener aspartame has been the subject of several controversies since its initial approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1974. The FDA approval of aspartame was highly contested,[1] with critics alleging that the quality of the initial research supporting its safety was inadequate and flawed and that conflicts of interest marred the approval of aspartame.[2][3][4] In 1987, the U.S. Government Accountability Office concluded that the food additive approval process had been followed properly for aspartame.[2][5] In spite of this, critics like anti-aspartame activist Betty Martini[6] have promoted undocumented claims that numerous health risks (such as multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus, methanol toxicity, blindness, spasms, shooting pains, seizures, headaches, depression, anxiety, memory loss, birth defects and death[7]) are associated with the consumption of aspartame in normal doses. These health risk claims have been examined and debunked by numerous scientific research projects, and are also generally dismissed by governments and major health and food safety organizations.[2][8][9]
Publicity of this controversy has been spread through an elaborate health scare[10] and "Internet smear campaign"[11] involving hoax[10][12][11] e-mails repeating Betty Martini's widely circulated conspiracy theory. Her undocumented claims are still repeated by thousands of self-published Web sites.
Aspartame has been found to be safe for human consumption by more than ninety countries worldwide,[13][14] with FDA officials describing aspartame as "one of the most thoroughly tested and studied food additives the agency has ever approved" and its safety as "clear cut".[4] The weight of existing scientific evidence indicates that aspartame is safe as a non-nutritive sweetener.[8]
SANITY-Minds are like parachutes. Just because you've LOST yours. Doesn't mean you can borrow MINE!!!....
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SANITY-Minds are like parachutes. Just because you've LOST yours. Doesn't mean you can borrow MINE!!!....
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post #11 of 40
You know, I saw that show too. At one point he refers to them as "Disco Truffles" or something along those lines. She also "bronzes" a chocolate bunny with luster dust which she claims is edible, but it's not...
post #12 of 40
Thread Starter 
THANK YOU ALL FOR YOUR HELP!!!
Glad I asked before I disco dusted everything! LOL!
Have a great day everyone! icon_smile.gificon_smile.gif
post #13 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by foxymomma521

You know, I saw that show too. At one point he refers to them as "Disco Truffles" or something along those lines. She also "bronzes" a chocolate bunny with luster dust which she claims is edible, but it's not...


your talking about the "Glitter Truffles" at Madame Chocolat!! it was on the food network. I called the shop yesterday to ask what they use. their glitter is definitely NOT disco dust. and since when is Luster dust not edible? i haven't heard this yet granted im not a professional. i use wilton pearl dust and i assume that it's the same thing just a different brand and wilton says it's edible, FDA approved and certified Kosher
A compromise is the art of dividing a cake in such a way that everyone believes he has the biggest piece ~Ludwig Erhard
Reply
A compromise is the art of dividing a cake in such a way that everyone believes he has the biggest piece ~Ludwig Erhard
Reply
post #14 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chonte

...since when is Luster dust not edible? i haven't heard this yet granted im not a professional. i use wilton pearl dust and i assume that it's the same thing just a different brand and wilton says it's edible, FDA approved and certified Kosher



Well, not all luster dusts are edible. Some are, again, merely "non-toxic". There are gold & silver "highlighter" luster dusts that are, indeed, marked for "decoration only", which is to say that they are to be used only on items that will be removed before eating. I also believe that there is a sapphire blue luster with the same designation, but I haven't seen it for awhile. For the most part, if it isn't marked FDA approved, or marketed as such, then it isn't edible.

There are a few FDA approved lusters out there. The one's I use are from Crystal Colors (sugarpaste.com). If I need a luster color that they don't have already made up, I mix their super pearl or bright silver pearl with a flat color from their line & it works very well.

The Wilton pearl dust isn't the same as most luster dusts. It's very "weak" and has a lot of filler in it. Either PS or CS--but I've forgotten at the moment. Yes, it is FDA approved, edible, & Kosher.

Rae
I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
Reply
I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
Reply
post #15 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chonte

Quote:
Originally Posted by foxymomma521

You know, I saw that show too. At one point he refers to them as "Disco Truffles" or something along those lines. She also "bronzes" a chocolate bunny with luster dust which she claims is edible, but it's not...


your talking about the "Glitter Truffles" at Madame Chocolat!! it was on the food network. I called the shop yesterday to ask what they use. their glitter is definitely NOT disco dust. and since when is Luster dust not edible? i haven't heard this yet granted im not a professional. i use wilton pearl dust and i assume that it's the same thing just a different brand and wilton says it's edible, FDA approved and certified Kosher



Not the same show I was referring to. The one I saw, they were definitely using DISCO DUST....not glitter. This was used on a cake, not on truffles...by a well known baker, on a well known show.
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