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Cake pops for previous customer - Page 4

post #46 of 59
I never disputed there should be a charge for labor. But for those who are set up to produce several at a time and have more experience - we are faster at it and therefore, the labor costs are lower as well. There are shortcuts that make the process much quicker (which is why I can't wait to get my new cake ball roller!)

My argument regarding the ingredient costs was in direct relation to the claim that there is just as much cake in the balls as there is in a cupcake. I was simply pointing out that the amount of cake used in my pops is irrelevent since it was essentially "waste".
post #47 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by WykdGud

I never disputed there should be a charge for labor. But for those who are set up to produce several at a time and have more experience - we are faster at it and therefore, the labor costs are lower as well. There are shortcuts that make the process much quicker (which is why I can't wait to get my new cake ball roller!)

My argument regarding the ingredient costs was in direct relation to the claim that there is just as much cake in the balls as there is in a cupcake. I was simply pointing out that the amount of cake used in my pops is irrelevent since it was essentially "waste".



Its not necessarily waste...you still paid for that cake....all costs are relevant. That's like me saying that using the leftover frosting from Cake A means I can give my customer with Cake B a discount because I'm using icing from Cake A....no...its all supplies I paid for. Its still cake and icing that I had to purchase. And now I'm selling my talent and labor to the public by turning that cake and icing into their order.

Not being nasty...just don't agree with your point of view.... thumbs_up.gif
post #48 of 59
Thread Starter 
Oh...and regarding being faster at it...that means you can take more orders...which means you are set up for volume.

I am not set up for volume....I actually TELL people I am not set up for volume...so my business is somewhat considered a "boutique". "Boutique" focuses on quality rather than speed and volume.

I'm not saying yours is NOT quality....I know that somebody is going to jump on that...but I'm saying my business has never claimed to do volume work, or to do anything quickly in order to push out more product. So how fast I do my work has nothing to do with my pricing because I'm not set up for doing ANYTHING in volume amounts. I price by quality and also by uniqueness... I'm willing to tackle projects other bakeries turn away... that sets me apart to an extent. So, again...I'm willing to tackle a cake pop project maybe others will not do....but if she DOES have someone who can do it in her budget, then by all means, she should order those if she would like.
post #49 of 59
Cake scraps ARE waste. If you don't find a use for them (such as cake balls) they end up in the garbage. You can't paste them together into a cake for another customer. You can, however, use the remainder of a batch of icing to ice another cake. Totally different things. And the cost of cake scraps are calculated into the cost of the cake you sold - right? If I take an order for an 8 inch cake and there are scraps left from trimming/leveling it - it doesn't matter because that cake was already "paid for".

Kinda like selling a plate of food at a restaurant. If I buy a steak, but don't finish the steak and it heads back into the kitchen - they aren't out any more money because I didn't eat it. And if they could legally turn that leftever scrap of steak into some stir-fry dish for another customer, then they've just lowered their ingredient costs and increased their profit margin on that stir-fry dish.

Since there is no extra time involved in mixing or baking cake scraps, the labor costs are significantly reduced. This only applies if you are using scraps and not baking specifically to grind it up for the cake balls.
post #50 of 59
For some reason, I can't see Kitagrl giving her previous customer 200 cakeballs made with cake scraps that she would be saving in her freezer.

I think I know Kitagrl will be baking a cake for these cakeballs and making them as pretty as she can make them.

But I know some people will turn scraps into their next customers meal. Kind of when I used to go to the cafeteria at my workplace and saw chicken sandwiches next day, lots of them, probably made with the baked chicken that was on the menu the previous day. (sigh). I bring my lunch now. I'm going to make sure I don't order stir-fry at restaurants, just in case. Yikes.
post #51 of 59
Thread Starter 
Ew. And I like stir fry, too....

Soups and chili are suspect too. Haha. Leftover ground up meat and burger from wherever....

I always worry that they recycle rolls or breadsticks at restaurants. LOL.
post #52 of 59
I have to agree with WykdGud.

I would be considered a boutique as well.

I can make then faster just because I make them all the time.


I dont use scraps, I use full cakes for all 10 of my flavours.
post #53 of 59
And Her thoughts on costs is right as well. If I am making my chocolate bars, And I cut off the edges, I divide my costs based on the number of BARS I made out of it. There for, whe. I use the edging for mini pieces for my surprise bags, they are no added cost.... essentially "free". The time and ingredient costs are in with the full bars.
post #54 of 59
sorry i shuoldnt say right, I should say I agree. My bad
post #55 of 59
I don't use scraps either. I bake an artisan cake and add top shelf liqueurs. I never freeze an edge of a cake, hoping I can sell it. That would go against my company's mission statement. Kitagrl, my business is based on quality, not speed, also. I don't think you are going to get your point across concerning the needs of your clientele. People will pay a premium for small batch baking with fine ingredients. They expect it to be fresh and of the highest quality. There is the profit.
post #56 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by scp1127

I don't use scraps either. I bake an artisan cake and add top shelf liqueurs. I never freeze an edge of a cake, hoping I can sell it. That would go against my company's mission statement. Kitagrl, my business is based on quality, not speed, also. I don't think you are going to get your point across concerning the needs of your clientele. People will pay a premium for small batch baking with fine ingredients. They expect it to be fresh and of the highest quality. There is the profit.



thumbs_up.gif
post #57 of 59
Yes MamaMia you definitely have me beat in Hawaii.

This was the first time I was compelled to write even though I have followed and read this blog for a long time as a hobby cake baker. I am quite familar with the site. I don't think I was posting an opinion any stronger than anyone else and I by no means was intending to offend Kitagrl. I was just trying to offer some suggestions and business advice. Kitagrl please accept my apology if my posting came off the wrong way.

I totally agree with you that licensed and inspected businesses have a higher overhead. Although my friend bakes from her home, she does in fact have a license. To whomever said it was illegal to bake at home in California is wrong. You can get a license but there are many stipulations you must meet in order to do so including having a door separating your kitchen from the rest of the house and certain ventilation and plumbing and sanitation.

I guess pricing will always be cheaper if someone is set up to do bulk or has more experience. WykdGud, I agree with you that it is more beneficial if you are using scraps, but in this case I don't think Kitagrl would be using scraps for a 200 cake pop order. Motherofgrace, you said that you are faster because you make them all the time, what would you suggest Kitagrl charge??
post #58 of 59
For me and my area, I would charge $3-$3.50. But location does make a big difference. I also use WASC variations for all my cakes. And my pops are about a TBSP of cake. So size plays in as well.

BUT if you can get $5 each then I commend you! That's fantastic! And I cannot wait to see them!
post #59 of 59
I made the sheep pops for a friends baby shower and thought the sugar pearls were way to hard, so I improvised. I took mini marshmallows and pulsed them in my food processor with powdered sugar until the were little ball of marshmallow, then rolled the pops in them. They looked fluffy and were really tasty. I will try to find a photo and post in my gallery.
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