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Sheet Cake Sizes

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
I have a question about sheet cakes... I've seen on different websites that people advertise 1/4 sheet, 1/2 sheet, full sheet and then the prices. Does anyone know what this translates to in pan size? I only have an 11x15 at this time, and just curious how to 'label' it. Also, from the reasearch I've done, an 11x15 sheet feeds about 30 people. Do you all usually put a second layer on sheets to double the servings? Or just leave it the single layer. I'm really new to sheet cakes, I usually do rounds and tiers. Any info/help is much appreciated!! Thanks! icon_biggrin.gif

Also... what's the average cost for a sheet cake?
post #2 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by CAC74

1/4 sheet, 1/2 sheet, full sheet
Does anyone know what this translates to in pan size?



9x13, 12x18, 16x24. http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

I wrote this in another thread about full sheets:

A commercial Bun pan is 18" x 26" (outside measurement), and because they are tapered for nesting or making them stackable, the inside measurement is 16.5" x 24.5".

A commercial full sheet is 16" x 24". They are baked in 16" x 24" bakeable cardboard trays that fit into the Bun pans (flat surface portion) which are used during baking for support and handling purposes.

A true commercial full sheet (16" x 24") serves 96 (unit wt. 106-124 oz.).

Quote:
Originally Posted by CAC74

I only have an 11x15 at this time, and just curious how to 'label' it.



1/3 sheet.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CAC74

Do you all usually put a second layer on sheets to double the servings? Or just leave it the single layer.



Sheets are single layer. Kitchen cakes are double layer.
post #3 of 25
Welcome, my sheets are as follows 9x13 is quarter, 11x15 is a third and 12x18 is a full. These are the sizes that I offer and I sell them not as a sheet but a rectangle as I double them with a filling and I double the servings. A sheet is typically one layer that you get from the grocer. If you flip your pan over you can measure how many serving you can get from that pan using 2" for your sizes. So yes, your 11x15 will make 30 servings one layer or 60 for two.
hth
post #4 of 25
This is what I found when I did a search for your answer.


The rectangular pan that most home bakers are familiar with (and that 1 box of Duncan Hines, Betty Crocker or Pillsbury cake mix will make one of) is the quarter sheet pan, which measures 13"x9", with a depth of either 2 or 3 inches. If you laid 4 of these pans together, this would be approx. the size of a full sheet. Hopefully the "chart" below will answer your other questions.

Pan name measurement # of 2-inch 2-inch "party" servings
Quarter sheet 13-inches x 9-inches 20
Half sheet 12-inches x 18-inches 40
3/4 sheet 18-inches x 18-inches 60
Full sheet 18-inches x 30-inches 80

Hope this helps.
Woman of God
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Woman of God
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post #5 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by sari66

Welcome, my sheets are as follows 9x13 is quarter, 11x15 is a third and 12x18 is a full. These are the sizes that I offer and I sell them not as a sheet but a rectangle as I double them with a filling and I double the servings. A sheet is typically one layer that you get from the grocer. If you flip your pan over you can measure how many serving you can get from that pan using 2" for your sizes. So yes, your 11x15 will make 30 servings one layer or 60 for two.
hth



The 12x18 is a half sheet... put two together and it's a bit larger than a true commercial full sheet. (full sheets won't fit in a home oven.)
post #6 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by NanaSandy

This is what I found when I did a search for your answer.


The rectangular pan that most home bakers are familiar with (and that 1 box of Duncan Hines, Betty Crocker or Pillsbury cake mix will make one of) is the quarter sheet pan, which measures 13"x9", with a depth of either 2 or 3 inches. If you laid 4 of these pans together, this would be approx. the size of a full sheet. Hopefully the "chart" below will answer your other questions.

Pan name measurement # of 2-inch 2-inch "party" servings
Quarter sheet 13-inches x 9-inches 20
Half sheet 12-inches x 18-inches 40
3/4 sheet 18-inches x 18-inches 60
Full sheet 18-inches x 30-inches 80

Hope this helps.



Don't know how to bake an 18x30 full sheet when the pans aren't that long.
post #7 of 25
CWR41 is correct and what the grocery stores have now considered a half sheet, (11x15) is actually more like a 1/3 sheet but instead of raising prices they have cut the size to increase profit. Ok sorry about the rant! LOL What I have done is let go of the sizes and just go by servings. I have found that people understand more of how many people they want to feed.
Failure is not an option!!
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Failure is not an option!!
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post #8 of 25
CWR41: now that I look at that closer...your right.

so now I am confused. What do you use to make a full sheet pan? Do you use 2 half sheet pans? What size pan do you use for your half sheet?
Woman of God
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Woman of God
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post #9 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by NanaSandy

CWR41: now that I look at that closer...your right.

so now I am confused. What do you use to make a full sheet pan? Do you use 2 half sheet pans? What size pan do you use for your half sheet?



my home oven won't fit a full sheet so I bake 2 12x18's and put them on a really sturdy board and ice and decorate as usual
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post #10 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakeandpartygirl

CWR41 is correct and what the grocery stores have now considered a half sheet, (11x15) is actually more like a 1/3 sheet but instead of raising prices they have cut the size to increase profit. Ok sorry about the rant! LOL What I have done is let go of the sizes and just go by servings. I have found that people understand more of how many people they want to feed.

Bingo on this one! Its on my LONG list of reasons why I refuse to use the terms "half" and "full" when describing a sheet cake. I would tell someone my half sheet is $75 and they would tell me "the grocery's 1/2 sheet is $50" and I'd have to explain to them that the grocery's half sheet is NOT a half sheet and its not as big as my LEGIT half sheet.

My primary reason for not using the terms is because most cake civilians have no freakin' clue how big those cakes are to start with....

Them: How much for a half sheet cake?
me: I dont' know .... how big IS a half sheet cake?
Them: Gosh I dont' know!
Me (thinking to myself): Then what the heck are you doing ordering something that you have NO IDEA what you are ordering!?

One guy, I swear to god, asked me for a full sheet cake price. I asked how many people he needed to serve. He told me TEN! TEN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I said, "Then why would you want to pay for 100 servings just to feed 10 people?" icon_confused.gif

They ask me "how much for a blah blah sheet cake?" I ask them how many peole they need to feed. They tell me. I then tell THEM what size cake they will need.
post #11 of 25
Thread Starter 
Thanks Everyone!! This is why I LOVE CC!! You are all so helpful! icon_biggrin.gif
post #12 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by cakeandpartygirl

CWR41 is correct and what the grocery stores have now considered a half sheet, (11x15) is actually more like a 1/3 sheet but instead of raising prices they have cut the size to increase profit. Ok sorry about the rant! LOL What I have done is let go of the sizes and just go by servings. I have found that people understand more of how many people they want to feed.

Bingo on this one! Its on my LONG list of reasons why I refuse to use the terms "half" and "full" when describing a sheet cake. I would tell someone my half sheet is $75 and they would tell me "the grocery's 1/2 sheet is $50" and I'd have to explain to them that the grocery's half sheet is NOT a half sheet and its not as big as my LEGIT half sheet.

My primary reason for not using the terms is because most cake civilians have no freakin' clue how big those cakes are to start with....

Them: How much for a half sheet cake?
me: I dont' know .... how big IS a half sheet cake?
Them: Gosh I dont' know!
Me (thinking to myself): Then what the heck are you doing ordering something that you have NO IDEA what you are ordering!?

One guy, I swear to god, asked me for a full sheet cake price. I asked how many people he needed to serve. He told me TEN! TEN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I said, "Then why would you want to pay for 100 servings just to feed 10 people?" icon_confused.gif

They ask me "how much for a blah blah sheet cake?" I ask them how many peole they need to feed. They tell me. I then tell THEM what size cake they will need.



And you, indydebi, are the very reason why I let it go!! thumbs_up.gificon_biggrin.gif
Failure is not an option!!
Reply
Failure is not an option!!
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post #13 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWR41

Quote:
Originally Posted by CAC74

1/4 sheet, 1/2 sheet, full sheet
Does anyone know what this translates to in pan size?



9x13, 12x18, 16x24. http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

I wrote this in another thread about full sheets:

A commercial Bun pan is 18" x 26" (outside measurement), and because they are tapered for nesting or making them stackable, the inside measurement is 16.5" x 24.5".

A commercial full sheet is 16" x 24". They are baked in 16" x 24" bakeable cardboard trays that fit into the Bun pans (flat surface portion) which are used during baking for support and handling purposes.

A true commercial full sheet (16" x 24") serves 96 (unit wt. 106-124 oz.).

Quote:
Originally Posted by CAC74

I only have an 11x15 at this time, and just curious how to 'label' it.



1/3 sheet.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CAC74

Do you all usually put a second layer on sheets to double the servings? Or just leave it the single layer.




What do you mean by Kitchen cakes? If you are making a sheet cake you can add a 2nd layer to it right too feed more?

Sheets are single layer. Kitchen cakes are double layer.
post #14 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by amcakemaker2011

What do you mean by Kitchen cakes? If you are making a sheet cake you can add a 2nd layer to it right too feed more?



Of course... a.k.a. a kitchen cake.
post #15 of 25

You are phenomenal! 

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