Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Recipes › All Great Bakers, what's your theory!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

All Great Bakers, what's your theory! - Page 2

post #16 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by tryingcake

How is simple syrup double the work? OMG - maybe added seconds, but not double the work. I don;t add it to every cake, but I do use it on occasion. It has never doubled my work load.



I think the people that are saying this mean it more like what some people say about using steak sauce on a steak..."If the steak is cooked properly, you shouldn't need steak sauce." That kind of thing. Just the way I'm reading it, but either way, not really helpful information was given, just criticism of others' suggestions. icon_rolleyes.gif

I agree with the over-baking comments...try lowering the temp or taking it out earlier...then again, I am such a novice it's not even funny, so take my advice with a grain of salt...just don't add it to your cake! Heehee. icon_razz.gif
"Cake or death?" "Eh, cake please." "Very well! Give him cake!" "Oh, thanks very much. It's very nice."
"You! Cake or death?" "Uh, cake for me, too, please." "Very well! Give him cake, too! We're gonna run out of cake at this rate."
Reply
"Cake or death?" "Eh, cake please." "Very well! Give him cake!" "Oh, thanks very much. It's very nice."
"You! Cake or death?" "Uh, cake for me, too, please." "Very well! Give him cake, too! We're gonna run out of cake at this rate."
Reply
post #17 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by calicopurr

The perfect cake shouldn't need a wash or a simple syrup. That's double the work.



I agree. I never use syrups and my cakes are always moist, flavorful, and delicious.
Darlita
Die-Hard Scratch Baker

Time...and baking heals all wounds.
Your only competition should be yourself.
Reply
Darlita
Die-Hard Scratch Baker

Time...and baking heals all wounds.
Your only competition should be yourself.
Reply
post #18 of 44
Thread Starter 
Sorry for my delayed response to these great posts. I went to choir rehearsal and asked my aunt if she had any suggestions. She is a pound cake baker. She suggested that I substitute some shortening or lard for part of the butter. She also mentioned that perhaps I should add another egg as someone else suggested. However, she was not sure of what the substitutions should be. She is old school and just eyeballs her measurements.

Also, will an extra egg turn it into a pound cake?
Despite difficult economic times, I'm determined to be rich!
Reply
Despite difficult economic times, I'm determined to be rich!
Reply
post #19 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetlayers

Sorry for my delayed response to these great posts. I went to choir rehearsal and asked my aunt if she had any suggestions. She is a pound cake baker. She suggested that I substitute some shortening or lard for part of the butter. She also mentioned that perhaps I should add another egg as someone else suggested. However, she was not sure of what the substitutions should be. She is old school and just eyeballs her measurements.

Also, will an extra egg turn it into a pound cake?



I am not sure. Would you mind posting the recipe? That would help everyone help you better icon_smile.gif
Darlita
Die-Hard Scratch Baker

Time...and baking heals all wounds.
Your only competition should be yourself.
Reply
Darlita
Die-Hard Scratch Baker

Time...and baking heals all wounds.
Your only competition should be yourself.
Reply
post #20 of 44
Leah_s, you are the first person I have seen to post the temperature that low. I do this all the time. I also remove it from the oven a little early, knowing it will bake a little more in the pan.

To the OP, let Linda144 look at your recipe. She's the best at finding ratios that are off.

Simple syrup... I can't use it. My scratch cakes are already moist. A good recipe, proper execution, and the right equipment will produce a balanced cake.
post #21 of 44
I also bake at a lower temp for longer (140c or 150c, i think this is about 280 / 300), i also add a pan of water to the bottom of the oven, so it's cooking in a slightly moist heat. I don't think you should just add an extra egg to the recipe without maybe letting others see the recipe first - you could just end up with a very eggy cake, which is not good!
I must say i'm curious about the poster who said did you sift then weigh your flour, or weigh then sift? How does this make any difference? The flour will weigh exactly the same either way?!
post #22 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emmar308

I also bake at a lower temp for longer (140c or 150c, i think this is about 280 / 300), i also add a pan of water to the bottom of the oven, so it's cooking in a slightly moist heat. I don't think you should just add an extra egg to the recipe without maybe letting others see the recipe first - you could just end up with a very eggy cake, which is not good!
I must say i'm curious about the poster who said did you sift then weigh your flour, or weigh then sift? How does this make any difference? The flour will weigh exactly the same either way?!



Despite years of baking experience, I admit to being self taught and all the recipes I use are American...thus use the American System of measurement. I rarely weigh ingredients. Could I bake with with recipes weighing ingredients...you bet, I just have to get my kitchen scale out of storage. With that being said, from my experience, if you take a cup of flour and sift it, then remeasure it....you will have slightly more than a cup. If the recipe calls for X amt of sifted flour but you measure, then sift, you would be putting more flour in than the recipe calls for.
Darlita
Die-Hard Scratch Baker

Time...and baking heals all wounds.
Your only competition should be yourself.
Reply
Darlita
Die-Hard Scratch Baker

Time...and baking heals all wounds.
Your only competition should be yourself.
Reply
post #23 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emmar308

I also bake at a lower temp for longer (140c or 150c, i think this is about 280 / 300), i also add a pan of water to the bottom of the oven, so it's cooking in a slightly moist heat. I don't think you should just add an extra egg to the recipe without maybe letting others see the recipe first - you could just end up with a very eggy cake, which is not good!
I must say i'm curious about the poster who said did you sift then weigh your flour, or weigh then sift? How does this make any difference? The flour will weigh exactly the same either way?!



No, the only way the flour will weigh the same is if you weigh it. If you measure it without weighing, it will less flour because you sift it into the cup, level and use that amount. If you scoop, you put more flour into your cup and get more by weight.

And I personally would never put lard in my cake. That is a trick our grandmother's used. There are other ways to get a moist cake. Post your recipe and process and then you can get a better idea.
I am no longer active on CC.  They will not let me delete my account.
Reply
I am no longer active on CC.  They will not let me delete my account.
Reply
post #24 of 44
Thread Starter 
Hi guys, I came to work this morning with the intention of posting my recipe and forgot the book at home. icon_sad.gif I'm so sorry. I will post asap this evening. Thank you for helping me figure this out.
Despite difficult economic times, I'm determined to be rich!
Reply
Despite difficult economic times, I'm determined to be rich!
Reply
post #25 of 44
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by elliespartycake

I make scratch cakes all the time...never has a "sawdust" problem. Did you bake it too long? Did you leave it out in the open for a while after it cooled and it dried out?
Occasionally, I brush my cakes with "moistening syrup", an mixture of sugar and water boiled together and a flavoring of your choosing (vanilla, orange, etc). I poke the top of the cake all over with a toothpick, and brush the top of the cake with the syrup. It adds an extra level of moistening.
Good luck.



This cake was dry when it came out of the oven. I set the timer and everything. Even right out of the oven when I cut the top off hot and tasted it it was dry. Very good, as I like hot cake better than cold, but dry just the same.
Despite difficult economic times, I'm determined to be rich!
Reply
Despite difficult economic times, I'm determined to be rich!
Reply
post #26 of 44
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lita829

It could be that you are overbaking the cake, over mixing it, the ratio of dry to wet ingredients is off, or it might just be a bad recipe. Also...when are you sifting your flour? If the recipe says X amt of sifted cake flour, then you sift then measure. If the recipe says X amt of cake flour, sifted...then measure out your flour then sift.

You could also try baking the cake more slowly. If it says to bake at 350, try baking the cake at 340 or 335.

Don't give up...it could have been a fluke or try a variety of recipes employing different methods of preparation and or different sources of "fat" or liquids in the recipe.

HTH



This recipe did not call for sifted flour, but did suggest cake flour which I used.
Despite difficult economic times, I'm determined to be rich!
Reply
Despite difficult economic times, I'm determined to be rich!
Reply
post #27 of 44
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

I've been baking from scratch for 50+ years. (Not a typo.) I'd say your cake was overbaked. I use a wash (simlpe syrup) on every cake, every time. And I bake between 300 and 310.



Leah_s

How much longer does it take bake your cakes at this temperature? Is it just a regular convection oven?
Despite difficult economic times, I'm determined to be rich!
Reply
Despite difficult economic times, I'm determined to be rich!
Reply
post #28 of 44
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LindaF144a

Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetlayers

Hi everyone,

I am right now eating a homemade scratch cake I made and the flavor is PERFECT! The texture of the granuals (sp) in the cake are PERFECT! The color..PERFECT!

However, eating this cake is like choking on SAWDUST! It is so dry. I mean SO DRY!

So I need to know, what makes a scratch cake moist? I mean really, what makes a cake moist every time. I know it may be a combination of things, regardless I'd like to hear all the theories proven or not.

I don't think I'm looking for a recipe per se, but more like a remedy for the PERFECT cake that is just super super dry!

Thanks in advance great bakers! I know you will knock this challenge out of the park. thumbs_up.gif



No one else asked, so I will.

What is your recipe?

I never get a scratch sawdust cake and I never use simple syrup either.

So possibly your recipe or process produced the dry cake.



I'll get this too you this evening eastern standard time. I left it at home.
Despite difficult economic times, I'm determined to be rich!
Reply
Despite difficult economic times, I'm determined to be rich!
Reply
post #29 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetlayers

This cake was dry when it came out of the oven. I set the timer and everything.



Reading this comment, I really think the dryness was caused from overbaking. If a recipe says to bake for 40 minutes at 350F, the temp is really too high and the time too long....at least in my experience. I would cut back on the temp to at least 325. As for the time, my grandma - who taught me how to bake - used to say, "When you can smell the cake, it's almost done."
post #30 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetlayers

Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

I've been baking from scratch for 50+ years. (Not a typo.) I'd say your cake was overbaked. I use a wash (simlpe syrup) on every cake, every time. And I bake between 300 and 310.



Leah_s

How much longer does it take bake your cakes at this temperature? Is it just a regular convection oven?



Sweetlayers....What type of oven are you baking with, conventional or convection. If it is convection and the temp given for the recipe is for conventional, you would need to decrease the baking temp (more than 25 degrees) and time, as convection bakes quicker than conventional. Even though I absolutely LOVE baking with convection, I've seen numerous posts in other threads stating that it can sometimes dry out a cake if the fan and/or temp is too high.
Darlita
Die-Hard Scratch Baker

Time...and baking heals all wounds.
Your only competition should be yourself.
Reply
Darlita
Die-Hard Scratch Baker

Time...and baking heals all wounds.
Your only competition should be yourself.
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Recipes
Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Recipes › All Great Bakers, what's your theory!