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what to expect with fondant covered cake in warm weather

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Hi all! I'm working on a child's bday cake (toy story theme) for Sunday. I've never done cakes in warm weather since I just started my decorating in January. I'm not sure what to expect with this cake as Sunday is supposed to be a high of 78 and slight chance of rain....which means humidity. This party is possibly going to be outside and I'm to deliver it to the party site.

Do I need to be concerned about something happening to the cake? sweating or anything like that? I couldn't decide if I should start it tonight or wait until tomorrow when it's a little closer to delivery time.

Tips on fondat and warm weather???
post #2 of 10
The first thing you can expect with normal fondant is that it will slide down the sides of your cake and all your figures will wilt! However, since I live in a hot, humid climate, I have a few suggestions. One thing I usually do is add a little more powdered sugar. Another is to add about 1 tsp. of CMC for every pound of fondant. The third thing I do is to work a little more shortening into the fondant than the recipe calls for (or 1-2 tablespoons of shortening per pound of fondant, if the recipe doesn't call for any or if you're using ready-made fondant). Not only is it hot where I live, but I work in a kitchen with no A/C. I've also made a lot of fondant cakes for outdoor parties (my granddaughter's birthday is in August, and it's always a pool party and I always make her a fondant cake). These are the things I do to keep my fondant from melting in the heat, and so far they've worked.
Marianna
"I know my own mind...and it's around here somewhere!"
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Marianna
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post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
I don't know what CMC is.....?
post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by dreamsville

I don't know what CMC is.....?



It's just like tylose
Here's a link that explains it:
http://thesugarlane.com/2009/05/12/whats-the-difference-tylose-powder-cmc-powder-trag-powder-gum-tex/
Even a fool, when he holdeth his peace, is counted wise: and he that shutteth his lips is esteemed a man of understanding. Proverbs 17:28
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Even a fool, when he holdeth his peace, is counted wise: and he that shutteth his lips is esteemed a man of understanding. Proverbs 17:28
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post #5 of 10
CMC, or tylose, will allow your fondant to dry harder than it normally would, something to be desired in warm climates, because the heat has the opposite effect of making it softer. You can get it at hobby places and cake supply stores or you can order it online.
Marianna
"I know my own mind...and it's around here somewhere!"
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Marianna
"I know my own mind...and it's around here somewhere!"
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post #6 of 10
The fondant will sweat if you refrigerate it. Doesn't cause a problem unless you touch it before it dries. Just give yourself time for it to come back to room temp.
post #7 of 10
Jennifer is right, but if the weather's very humid, it can take a LONG time for the fondant to dry. Another trick, if you just have to refrigerate your cake (in this short time frame, if there's nothing perishable in the cake or the filling, I would just leave it out) and if you have the space in your fridge, is to refrigerate it in a box that's been wrapped in plastic wrap. Then, when you take the cake out (several hours in advance!) let it come to room temp before you unwrap the box. That way the condensation froms on the box and not on the fondant.
Marianna
"I know my own mind...and it's around here somewhere!"
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Marianna
"I know my own mind...and it's around here somewhere!"
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post #8 of 10
I tend to use gum tragacanth and if the fondant becomes too hard I work in some shortening to make it easy to use. CMC to me just adds elasticity to fondant.

What's tylose for plsssss? Does it serve d same purpose as gum tragacanth?
post #9 of 10
I tend to use gum tragacanth and if the fondant becomes too hard I work in some shortening to make it easy to use. CMC to me just adds elasticity to fondant.

What's tylose for plsssss? Does it serve d same purpose as gum tragacanth?
post #10 of 10
Tylose is, I think, a brand name of CMC. At any rate, it does exactly the same thing. And it not only makes your fondant more elastic, it thickens it considerably and keeps it from being runny in the hot, humid places like CancĂșn, where I live. I've always thought of it as the "poor man's gum tragacanth"- it doesn't occur naturally, but is rather something made in the lab. However, it costs about half of what gum tragacanth does, so it gets my vote every time. Also, in my case, CMC is more readily available: I can get it at my local cake shop, whereas I have to send off for gum tragacanth.
Marianna
"I know my own mind...and it's around here somewhere!"
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Marianna
"I know my own mind...and it's around here somewhere!"
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