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Ganache failure... multiple times - Page 2

post #16 of 28
My guess is that you are over boiling the cream. You only want to just bring it to a rolling boil - you need to be standing there watching the whole time and as soon as it starts to boil, pull it off. I have over boiled the cream several times and the ganache is useless - it sort of curdles the way chocolate does when you get water in it. I also use pure cream. And I use Nestle choc melts or even just a block of eating choc.
post #17 of 28
heavy whipping cream is the right thing to use, i think by the sound of things that there maybe a difference in the temp of the choc chips and the cream, when i add the bakers choc squares they are not melted, they melt as i whisk them into the hot cream. hope this helps!
post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by kimbordeaux

I should have stated that when I melt the chips the chips are completely melted. I see no lumps. The cream is hot when I add it. That is what's confusing to me, everythings fine until I add cream. Heavy whipping cream is okay to use isn't it? I cannot find just heavy cream where I'm at. I guess I'll try Bakers chocolate today.



Heavy whipping cream is ok to use.
Failure is not an option!!
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Failure is not an option!!
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post #19 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by kimbordeaux

I should have stated that when I melt the chips the chips are completely melted. I see no lumps. The cream is hot when I add it. That is what's confusing to me, everythings fine until I add cream. Heavy whipping cream is okay to use isn't it? I cannot find just heavy cream where I'm at. I guess I'll try Bakers chocolate today.



One tip I have heard is to replace some of the heavy whipping cream with butter since heavy whipping cream doesn't have as much fat as heavy cream.

Also - remember that the ratios are based on weight and not volume.
Matt
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Matt
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post #20 of 28
Quote:
Quote:

I should have stated that when I melt the chips the chips are completely melted.



You are not supposed to melt the chocolate first. You pour the hot cream over unmelted chocolate chunks (or chips). The heat from the cream will melt the chocolate.

Unless I've misunderstood you, I think we may have figured out the problem. icon_smile.gif
post #21 of 28
Unless I am reading this wrong, it sounds like your chocolate is seizing to me. After heating the cream, pour it into a heat proof bowl. THEN add the chopped chocolate or chocolate chips to the heated cream. Let it sit for a minute or so to melt, then begin stirring. It probably seems like a minor detail, but when I add the chocolate to the cream, rather than adding the cream to the chocolate, I never have a seizing problem.
post #22 of 28
I am going to try the ganache today so I am glad I stumbled upon all these tips! My question is since there is cream in it, does it have to be refrigerated when using as a filling? I am using it in a fondant covered cake so what would be the best way to handle this and not mess up my fondant by refrigerating? How long can i let the ganache sit at room temp?

Thanks for the help!
post #23 of 28
I only use Nestle's chips, but I use the white ones...12oz. bag + 1/2 cup heavy cream.

I melt my chips completely in the mic, then add the almost boiled cream to it. The hot cream alone won't melt the chips.

When I tried using Nestle's regular chocolate chips, it was harder to get a smooth mixture...I had to mic it several times, and even when all appeared fine and it set nicely, once I started to spread it on a cake...some of it started to harden and little lumps/rocks/chips were forming.

The whites are so much easier to work with and I always get a consistent result. It's not high-end but it works great and I happen to love the taste.
post #24 of 28
No you don't have to refrigerate it - that's why you boil the cream. It changes the composition. It's fine to leave it on the bench.
post #25 of 28
What are you using the ganache for? If you're using it crumb coat, you need to use a 2:1 ratio with 60% cocoa (good quality dark chocolate) or 3:1 ratio for milk or white chocolate. Bars of baking chocolate work best for this. Chop the chocolate up very fine and place in a bowl. Do not heat the chocolate. Bring the heavy cream to a low boil in a sauce pan (little bubbles around the edges and some in the middle). Immediately remove the cream from the heat and pour over the chopped chocolate. Wait one minute then gently stir until smooth and shiny. Let sit out at room temp until cool and peanut butter consistency.

I don't ever heat the cream in the microwave as you may overheat the cream this way.
Three Little Blackbirds (TLBCakes)
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Three Little Blackbirds (TLBCakes)
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post #26 of 28
When I make ganache, I cut/chop the chocolate and put it into my KA mixer bowl. Heat the cream just until boiling, and pour the cream over the chocolate. Let it sit for a few minutes, then put the bowl on the KA and, using the paddle, let the mixer mix it on low until all chocolate is melted and the mixture has cooled slightly.

~Chelle
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Interested in ICES? www.ices.org Live in Mass? www.massices.com
Want to see my cakes? www.chellescakes.com
http://cakingmysanity.blogspot.com/
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post #27 of 28
First, heavy cream and heavy whipping cream are the same thing.

If you are adding butter you are not making a true ganache, the butter will make your final product softer, more like an icing or a glaze.

This was actually hit on in the first post: You are trying to use a product (chocolate chips) that have added junk in them to make them hold their shape under high heat so they won't melt. Read the ingredients! Sure, you can make them work, or you can save yourself the headache and buy natural chocolate that is meant to be melted.

Do not melt your chocolate first, especially since you are probably burning it and didn't even know it. That completely goes against chocolate science. When making a ganache you are tempering it. Semi sweet chocolate melts between 86-90 degrees, your perfect melting temperature is 98. You do not want your chocolate to go over 98 degrees thru this whole process, which is why you pour hot cream over your chocolate.

The higher sugar content and lower cocoa content of your chocolate, the easier it is to burn, causing lumpy chocolate.

To make ganache:
Run your chocolate thru a food processor to break it down or finely chop with a knife.

Bring your cream to just a boil, pour it over the top. Do NOT cover with plastic wrap. This can cause condensation on the plastic, dropping water in your ganache and making it seize (lumpy). Let sit for 5 minutes then stir. Use a silicone spatula.

If you still have chunks of unmelted chocolate, do not microwave, you can seize your chocolate or burn it because it's pretty impossible to keep the temperature under 98 degrees in the micro.

The best way to make perfect ganache is get a heating pad, put it in a big bowl, turn it on high and put your bowl of ganache on it. Let it sit for 20-30 minutes, gently stirring occasionally until smooth. Take your bowl off and let it cool to the consistency you want it, then put it back on the heating pad while you work with it. It will help prevent the chocolate form getting too cold cold to work with.
post #28 of 28
The only recipe I ever use for ganache is Chocolate Ganache 1 by cheftaz. It's in the recipe section here on CC. It's quick and easy, I can have a batch ready in about 15 minutes. (I use a metal or glass bowl and it only takes a couple of minutes with my whisk to mix the ingredients).

For pouring over cake, I let it cool to room temp. For frosting a cake, refrig for at least an hour before spreading on cake, and it pipes beautifully for borders and such. For whipped ganache, I use either my hand or stand mixer and whip until it turns mocha brown in color. It tastes delicious and the texture is silky smooth.

I use whichever choc chips I can find at the store whether they be Hershey, Nestle or Ghiradelli. Milk or semi-sweet or dark, or a mixture of them.

I've used this recipe from the hot, humid summer temps of Texas to the dry, frigid cold of Eastern Washington State. Never had a problem. It double batches beautifully. And I use it under fondant.
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