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swiss/italian merengue buttercream - Page 2

post #16 of 56
I use whatever is real butter and on sale to be honest. On a TIGHT budget! icon_eek.gif
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post #17 of 56
Not all butters are created equal. Just like off brand sugar and flour. Try Land O Lakes one time and see if your butter is not working. I know it is expensive, but you may need to adjust your price if thisis the only solution.
post #18 of 56
I deffinitely have used Land O' Lakes because sometimes that's all I can really find that is real butter and not Margarine. However, I haven't used it every time so I couldn't give an accurate response to what a difference it could have made. I'll try that though.

Has anyone heard that sometimes the butter will turn the bc to a soft consistancy and it will thicken up if you keep whipping it? Is this true? I've heard it several different times and I'm wondering if these people are just lucky or something?? icon_rolleyes.gif
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post #19 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetaudrey

I deffinitely have used Land O' Lakes because sometimes that's all I can really find that is real butter and not Margarine. However, I haven't used it every time so I couldn't give an accurate response to what a difference it could have made. I'll try that though.

Has anyone heard that sometimes the butter will turn the bc to a soft consistancy and it will thicken up if you keep whipping it? Is this true? I've heard it several different times and I'm wondering if these people are just lucky or something?? icon_rolleyes.gif



No, I've never had that happen and I make a LOT of SMBC. Most people don't realize that European buttercreams rely on creating an emulsion that can't be forced or whipped if you don't allow science to do it's thing.

I just did a tutorial on my blog...

http://fromscratchsf.wordpress.com/

Jen
post #20 of 56
Does SMBC crust at all??
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post #21 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by scp1127

My recipes are 238 to 245, so they are right. What butter do you use? I only use Land O Lakes, so if it is another brand, hopefully someone will chime in.



While we are on the subject of IMBC I have a question. I hope I am replying correctly, still getting use to posting.

I am able to make a beautiful batch of IMBC. I have a KitchenAid pro 6 and use LOL butter. I am having a problem remixing the IMBC after it has chilled in the fridge (usually overnight). It separates. I have tried letting it sit out to room temp, taking the chill off in the microwave for 30 seconds at a time at 30%, using the paddle or a fork and it separates every time, looking like glumps of butter swimming through syrupy water. I would love to be able to make IMBC before making cakes and letting the kitchen cool down.

Any insight would be greatly appreciated.
post #22 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by MustardSeed

Quote:
Originally Posted by scp1127

My recipes are 238 to 245, so they are right. What butter do you use? I only use Land O Lakes, so if it is another brand, hopefully someone will chime in.



While we are on the subject of IMBC I have a question. I hope I am replying correctly, still getting use to posting.

I am able to make a beautiful batch of IMBC. I have a KitchenAid pro 6 and use LOL butter. I am having a problem remixing the IMBC after it has chilled in the fridge (usually overnight). It separates. I have tried letting it sit out to room temp, taking the chill off in the microwave for 30 seconds at a time at 30%, using the paddle or a fork and it separates every time, looking like glumps of butter swimming through syrupy water. I would love to be able to make IMBC before making cakes and letting the kitchen cool down.

Any insight would be greatly appreciated.



Easy - don't refrigerate it. It's unnecessary, especially if it's only overnight.

Jen
post #23 of 56
Thanks Jen! I thought it would get soupy if left out.
post #24 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by MustardSeed

Thanks Jen! I thought it would get soupy if left out.



Nope! It'll only get soft if it's warm.
post #25 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetaudrey

Quote:
Originally Posted by scp1127

This may sound odd, but what size is your mixer? I have Kitchenaids... a pro 6 and it comes together perfectly. If I am making another batch in my artisan right beside it, it takes forever. Reason: The artisan creates heat at the motor and makes the process take forever. The pro 6 stays cool. For the smaller mixer I have taken the CC advice and packed frozen vegetables around the outside of the bowl. And I wipe down the motor area periodically with a cool cloth. Another thing I do is my butter is still cold. I do the finger indent test (can push your finger in but there is still resistance). Your only problem is temperature. Sometimes you just have to find the odd quirks of your equipment.



I want a kitchenaid SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO SO bad, but cannot afford one right now. So I just have a cheap stand mixer. And honestly, I have a feeling that is my problem, but I guess I'm just not ready to face that yet haha. But I do put ice packs around the bowl and everything seems to cool down very easily. Temp doesn't seem to be a huge problem because the meringue does cool down very nicely. It's just when I add the butter in that makes it soupy. And My butter is still cold also, it's just softened. I've tried to experiment with that because sometimes I'll get little bits of butter in it that I cannot get out no matter what I do. I've hear d other people having this problem, but I don't have a solution yet. icon_cool.gif



What attachment are you using in your mixer? I use IMBC exclusively for my buttercream. Originally I made it with a hand mixer and now I have just started making it with a stand mixer. I use the whisk attachment to whip the egg whites, keep the whisk for adding the sugar, keep the whisk when I add the butter and then once the butter is incorporated I change to the paddle. I have found that if you keep the whisk attachment on to finish mixing the buttercream, the buttercream starts to separate and looks like it has water seeping out of it. As soon as I switch to the paddle on high speed it comes together perfectly.

I tried to bring frozen IMBC (defrosted to room temp) back to fluffiness when I first had the stand mixer by using the whisk attachment, that had the exact same affect - separated. At that stage I didn't think to use the paddle, but I would think that the paddle would have brought it back to life.

Maybe that is your issue??
post #26 of 56
I just use the regular beaters that come with the cheap stand mixer (like a hand mixer type beater). I was hoping that a whisk attachment for a hand mixer would fit in, but it doesn't. icon_cry.gif So, I'm stuck with the beaters. I was afraid that maybe this was my problem, but I don't have much of another option unless I use a whisk by hand.
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post #27 of 56
Hey LisaPeps, you are the one who got me through my first batch of IMBC!!! I do change the blade to the scraper blade to add the butter.

FromScratch, thanks for the tip about leaving it out.
post #28 of 56
Stupid question here:

What is the big deal with the Swiss/Italian meringues?
I have never made them, and wonder, does it turn out like the meringue on a lemon meringue pie? Is it a baked frosting? Does it crust? What type cakes do you use it for? Does it have a taste or once again, is it like the pie one? And what is the difference between the two meringue tastes?

I would love to try it, but not sure what makes this so good. Also, is this a 'frosting' that you don't put any decorations on? You just use it as a frosting?
thank you for all my questions.
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post #29 of 56
Much more qualified can answer better than I can. It is so refined, not a greasy sugar rush compared to grocery store icing. These are the european cooked recipes of the past making a resurgence in mainstream baking. They have always been the staples of pastry chefs.
post #30 of 56
Vickymacd -- the big deal is that it is incredibly delicious, more sophisticated, and less sugary than the crisco/powdered sugar type of buttercream. No, it is not like the meringue on a pie -- it starts out that way, but then you beat a lot of butter into it and it becomes a delicious frosting. You can smooth it (with a warm knife or bench scraper), you can pipe with it (although it is softer than shortening-based buttercreams), it does not crust, it can be decorated with fondant accents or modelling chocolate. Because it is made with a lot of butter, it acts like butter would in heat and humidity. It should be chilled for storage, and on the cake, and brought to room temp before being served for best flavor. It will keep in the refrigerator for weeks and in the freezer for longer than that. It should be brought to room temp before being re-beaten.
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