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Putting ganache under fondant + how to prepare cakes

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Hi everyone. Two questions!!!!

I'm new to cake decorating and fondant. I always use buttercream as I never really "got" how people put ganache under their fondant. I have only ever poured ganache and made truffles out of it and heard mixed reviews on if I should whip it prior to spreading (when it's going under fondant) or...? Do I make it as if I were pouring and let it settle/thicken and then spread?

This brings me to my next question.
I think some of my fondant troubles spawn from the way I'm prepping my cake. When stacking cakes I find I have an indentation that leaves an uneven side. To balance it I fill it in with icing - this tends to get thick. What I do when I need to fondant a cake is torte it, buttercream (thick if it's uneven and it ALWAYS is), refridgerate overnight. The next day I add a thin layer and stick the fondant to that. Of course when my buttercream softens my fondant is not smooth looking.
How do I fix this? I feel the even cake thing is out of my control. Do you guys slice uneven edges off as you would slice an uneven top off? If so, how do you manage to ice what's left? My cakes crumble if I'm not icing a smooth edge that was touching the pan (if that makes sense). And...how can I ganache under my fondant if I can't smooth my cake (it feels ganache would be less forgiving than buttercream).

Sorry if my questions are confusing - tysm!!!
post #2 of 19
Thread Starter 
icon_sad.gif
No one here uses ganache under cakes or knows about trimming?
post #3 of 19
Hi there,

prepare your ganache as you would for pouring, then leave it to set overnight. Next day, beat the ganache to soften it to spreading consistency and spread an even layer around the sides and top of ypur cake. Smooth it with a palette knife and leave to set - overnight or in the fridge if you are in a rush. Then take a clean palette knife or royal icing spreader, dip in boiled hot water, wipe on a dry cloth and smooth your ganace. You should be able tp get a really clean, smooth finish, as the heat smooths it out. Whilst it is still damp, I then cover it with fondant

second question - if you don't start with an even cake - you won't finish with one, whatever you do. I always level my cakes before I even begin to fill and ice! Check Planet Cake for ganache ing (?) cakes - good luck x
post #4 of 19
Use ganache that is set to room temperature (firm, but spreadable) and smooth it with a bench scraper around the sides, & a long straight spatula on top. You can trim ragged edges off the top edge with a hot serrated bread knife after the ganache has set up on the cake if necessary. If you want good instructions on using ganache under fondant then 'Planet Cake' by Paris Cutler is a really great place to start. The cakes in the book are nothing special design-wise, but the technique and finish on them is very good.
post #5 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moondance

Hi there,

prepare your ganache as you would for pouring, then leave it to set overnight. Next day, beat the ganache to soften it to spreading consistency and spread an even layer around the sides and top of ypur cake. Smooth it with a palette knife and leave to set - overnight or in the fridge if you are in a rush. Then take a clean palette knife or royal icing spreader, dip in boiled hot water, wipe on a dry cloth and smooth your ganace. You should be able tp get a really clean, smooth finish, as the heat smooths it out. Whilst it is still damp, I then cover it with fondant

second question - if you don't start with an even cake - you won't finish with one, whatever you do. I always level my cakes before I even begin to fill and ice! Check Planet Cake for ganache ing (?) cakes - good luck x



LOL you just beat me to it! Looks like we have the same book icon_biggrin.gif
post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys!

So it's agreed keeping sides uneven and filling with icing is a bad idea lol..


How do you ice a cut cake? Mine always crumble, which is why I was 'filling in" instead.
post #7 of 19
wow this forum came in perfect timing for me! I'm doing one with ganache under fondant for the first time as well in a couple weeks! Glad I checked this out =)
Laissez les bon temps rouler!!!
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Laissez les bon temps rouler!!!
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post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coral3



LOL you just beat me to it! Looks like we have the same book icon_biggrin.gif



Great minds Coral!
post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugardugar

Thanks guys!

So it's agreed keeping sides uneven and filling with icing is a bad idea lol..


How do you ice a cut cake? Mine always crumble, which is why I was 'filling in" instead.



When I say 'level' the cakes, I mean I level the top - use a long, sharp knife or a cake leveller. The you turn the levelled top over so it becomes the bottom of your cake on the board, and your nice flat bottom is the top. I don't level the sides - place on a board the same size, and use the ganache to create a level surface - hope that helps - icon_smile.gif
post #10 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moondance

Quote:
Originally Posted by sugardugar

Thanks guys!

So it's agreed keeping sides uneven and filling with icing is a bad idea lol..


How do you ice a cut cake? Mine always crumble, which is why I was 'filling in" instead.



When I say 'level' the cakes, I mean I level the top - use a long, sharp knife or a cake leveller. The you turn the levelled top over so it becomes the bottom of your cake on the board, and your nice flat bottom is the top. I don't level the sides - place on a board the same size, and use the ganache to create a level surface - hope that helps - icon_smile.gif



yes i level top with a cake leveller. my problem is...the sides never seem to meet perfectly. maybe it's because i have to cut so much off the top...but the sides of my cakes are never straight. instead i would add a generous amount of bc to fill this in and pop it in the fridge over night. the next day, post-fondant, when the bc comes to room temp, i find it causes buldges...should i level the sides? ugh!
post #11 of 19
You can "crumb coat" the sides of your cake with ganache, the same as you would with buttercream. Aim to get your ganache fairly thin to do this - you can zap it in the microwave a few seconds at a time, stirring in between to make sure it is evenly melted. Apply with a spatula to the sides of the cake - you will get crumbs in this coating, but that's fine, they will stick to the ganache and not go anywhere. After this coat has set up and is firm, you can do your final coat of ganache - here is where you keep adding and scraping, adding and scraping, until you have totally filled, even, vertical sides icon_wink.gif
If you make a "dam" out of ganache, using a piping bag, before you fill your layers with buttercream or whatever, you shouldn't have any bulges coming out the sides of the layers.
post #12 of 19
Thread Starter 
will try ty icon_smile.gif
post #13 of 19
Some great advice up there , so I won't repeat , I will add that once my ganache is set and dry , I use a little sugar syrup lightly brushed on the cake to stick the fondant to it. Make sure you clean the bottom of the cake where it meets the boasrd of any excess with a paper towel .
post #14 of 19
Ok, quick question. AFter I spread the ganache and leave it to set, does it need to be covered or can it just sit out on the counter?
post #15 of 19
I leave mine on the counter in a cake box so it's not exposed to dust etc. You can put it in the fridge though
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