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corn syrup in Australia

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Hi, Can anyone tell me if you can get corn syrup in Australia if so where, and if not what would be a subsitute. I do have glucose syrup but not sure if that is the same.
Thanks
post #2 of 19
oh my goodness, I had this exact same issue, it was driving me mad! I found so many posts with different information. Some said glucose is totally different and should not be substituted, so that was enough to make me worried.

Turns out glucose used to be made of something different (can't remember what), but now it's made of something else, and is now very similar to corn syrup. However it's a LOT thicker than corn syrup. The glucose you will buy will be thick like honey. I can't think of anything to compare corn syrup to, but it's significantly runnier. (I managed to get hold of a hideously expensive bottle of the american brand corn syrup so that I could see what it was like, but have no intention of continuing to import it, SO expensive).

Anyway, you just need to add a tiny bit of water to your glucose and you will be able to use it in place of corn syrup. Put two teaspoons of water into a measuring cup, then fill it up with glucose until it gets to the 1/2 cup mark. Mix it up, and voila, you have a similar consistency to corn syrup.

I've used both the purchased corn syrup and my home-made version and got the exact same results in my recipe.

I hope that helps!
post #3 of 19
i make my own in big batches.. glucose is so expensive and thikc.. and generally just a pita! lol.

here a link to the recipe i use..

i make it in big batches and store in an airtight container.
http://www.thriftyfun.com/tf21362042.tip.html
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post #4 of 19
I think golden syrup would work fine if you have it there.
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post #5 of 19
awesome noahsmummy, I use so little of it I don't mind buying the glucose, but I'm going to file that away in case I ever start needing large amounts - thanks!
post #6 of 19
no problem - i make alot of mff, which requires corn syrup, it truly work well in place of the corn syrup.
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post #7 of 19
Please do not use golden syrup in place of white/light corn syrup!!

I now buy glucose in 6kg jars, and it is made from maize, which is...corn. So, very very similar to corn syrup. I substitute it directly for corn syrup, undiluted, but then again I don't make a lot of fondant or GP with it icon_smile.gif

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Life's too short to make cake pops.
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post #8 of 19
In the United States, glucose syrup is called "Corn syrup" because it comes almost exclusively from maize.

Although corn syrup is a glucose syrup, glucose syrup is not always corn syrup. Glucose syrup is also produced from wheat, barley, tapioca, potato, rice, cassava, arrowroot, sago and maize starches.

Modern corn syrups unfortunately contain high levels of fructose rather than mostly glucose.

I checked the Karo website:
Karo Light corn syrup: Light corn syrup, high fructose corn syrup, salt, vanilla.
Karo Dark corn syrup: Dark corn syrup, refiners syrup [cane sugar syrup], caramel flavor, salt, sodium benzoate, caramel color.

Glucose syrup tends to be a thick syrup. Corn syrup [US] tends to be a thinner syrup.

The equivalence is 120ml corn syrup plus 45ml water equals 120ml glucose plus 60ml water to produce similar results [usually].

They can be interchanged in some recipes BUT they can/do react differently.

IGA supermarkets, Coles and foodservice companies like Dijon Foods periodically have it in stock.
post #9 of 19
When I was going through my corn syrup finding dilemma, I even contacted Karo! They said they don't export anywhere in the world, that they only sell in America. Does that mean the stuff you've seen in coles etc is a different brand, or they've somehow got some karo? I really like the karo bottle, it's a squeezy, so much tidier to handle than my queens glucose whcih comes in a jar I have to dip a spoon into. When my karo is empty I'll refill it with queens & water I think!
post #10 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thank you all so much for the advice, I am going to try the diluted glucose today as already have it in the cubboard anyway. I think I am going to get very addicted to this site very quickly lol.
Thanks again
post #11 of 19
I've substituted glucose once before when I made Neoclassic buttercream and it didn't work so I won't do that again.(I make that butter cream a lot and I've never had problems when making it with corn syrup).
Here are two links to where I buy it online.

http://www.completecakedec.com.au/index.html
http://www.carolines.com.au/
post #12 of 19
I can get light and dark Karo from a wholesaler I use (they also sell to the public). They sell all sorts of imported produce.

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___________________________________
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post #13 of 19
That's fabulou Evoir, which wholesaler is it? For anyone from Auckland who might come upon this thread one day, there is a place in Mt Wellington called 'Matha's backyard' which imports american products. They sell small bottles of Karo for $8.50.

BUT, yesterday I was at my regular supermarket looking for sesame oil in the asian section, and lo and behold there was some corn syrup! The entire label was in chinese (I think), except for the words corn syrup. I tipped the bottle upside down to see how the liquid moves, and it's definitely corn syrup, not glucose. So I'm pretty excited about that, and will be trying it out.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Evoir

I can get light and dark Karo from a wholesaler I use (they also sell to the public). They sell all sorts of imported produce.
post #14 of 19
The store is called Bibinas, at Warners Bay.

I should mention I have also found it in the health food sections of SOME of the city-based Coles supermarkets.

HTH!

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post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by kimmum

Hi, Can anyone tell me if you can get corn syrup in Australia if so where, and if not what would be a subsitute. I do have glucose syrup but not sure if that is the same.
Thanks



I have found that Glucose syrup is a very good substitute although it is getting easier to find Karo Corn Syrup now in the supermarket. I found a small article at http://cookingsoftware.com.au/index.php5?title=Corn_syrup that might help

Tasha
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