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Why does my cake still look lumpy underneath the fondant?? - Page 3

post #31 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by valcomer

if you are using white chocolate for the ganache under fondant...what is the difference ratio to make it?



3 parts white choc BY WEIGHT to 1 part 35% fat cream (this is heavy cream in the US, whipping cream elsewhere).

So for every cup of cream, you need 1lb 12oz of white chocolate

or if you work in metric 250ml cream to 750g white chocolate

HTH!
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post #32 of 54
I work by cups not weight and it is the same...3 cups of white chocolate to 1 cup of heavy cream. This works for white chocolate in chip form only. Either the regular chips (Hershey's, Nestle's) or the melting chips used for candy. If you are using block chocolate or shaved/grated chocolate then do it by weight.
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post #33 of 54
OK, I have read all the helpful tips on using ganache under the fondant to help get a smooth fondant covering (I have endless problems with this so I am definately going to try the ganache), the only query I have, if I am doing a cake that isnt chocolate sponge, for example a lemon or vanilla cake with a fondant covering - would the ganache layer under the fondant not add a chocolatey taste to the cake? Does it only work on chocolate cakes?

Apologies if this seems basic or has been answered before, but I have never used ganache, so trying to get all the info before I try

thanks
Clare
post #34 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClareBear66

OK, I have read all the helpful tips on using ganache under the fondant to help get a smooth fondant covering (I have endless problems with this so I am definately going to try the ganache), the only query I have, if I am doing a cake that isnt chocolate sponge, for example a lemon or vanilla cake with a fondant covering - would the ganache layer under the fondant not add a chocolatey taste to the cake? Does it only work on chocolate cakes?

Apologies if this seems basic or has been answered before, but I have never used ganache, so trying to get all the info before I try

thanks
Clare



You could always use a white chocolate ganache, just make sure to change the ratio (3 to 1?)
post #35 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClareBear66

OK, I have read all the helpful tips on using ganache under the fondant to help get a smooth fondant covering (I have endless problems with this so I am definately going to try the ganache), the only query I have, if I am doing a cake that isnt chocolate sponge, for example a lemon or vanilla cake with a fondant covering - would the ganache layer under the fondant not add a chocolatey taste to the cake? Does it only work on chocolate cakes?

Apologies if this seems basic or has been answered before, but I have never used ganache, so trying to get all the info before I try

thanks
Clare



Use white choc ganache - it goes with just about everything. And you can add flavourings to it if you want to eg. lemon essence or liqueurs. Just add a couple of teaspoons of essence, or a tablespoon or two of Baileys or kalhua etc while you're mixiing the ganache.
post #36 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by valcomer

if you are using white chocolate for the ganache under fondant...what is the difference ratio to make it?



I use Planet Cake's white chocolate recipe. 3 lbs white chocolate finely chopped and 1 3/4 cups plus 1 tablespoon whipping cream.

Yum-o!
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Check out my cake blog at: http://adventuresofacakediva.com
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post #37 of 54
thanks so much - I will give the white chocolate ganache & flavouring a go tonight

cheers
clare
post #38 of 54
For those of you who use ganache in the US, what type of white chocolate do you use? I know most of what is labeled "white chocolate" isn't actually chocolate because it doesn't have cocoa butter in it- right?
post #39 of 54
True white chocolate does contain cocoa butter. It's cocoa solids that it does not contain, which is why it technically is not really classified as a chocolate. There are many things out there that try to fool you into thinking they are white chocolate. But they are usually called white baking chips or white baking bars. Real white chocolate should always be labeled, white chocolate.
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Housework makes you ugly.

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post #40 of 54
And- you can't use white baking chips or white baking bars or wilton candy melts to make ganache- right?
-sorry if this sounds like I'm repeating myself, I just want to be sure- white chocoalte is sooo expensive!
post #41 of 54
Sorry, I know I must sound like a broken record, but a few more tips needed about ganache

When you use ganache as a filling - does it harden up or stay smooth

when you cover a cake in spreadable ganache (that has set up from the runny ganache) does it harden into a shell like form where it is too hard to cut when the it comes to eating the cake

Lastly, can you use choc ganache to stack a cake - ie when you have got the edges smooth with ganache & covered each tier in fondant - is it ok to dowel the tiers for stacking or will the ganache crack & cause the fondant to split

thanks in advance
Clare
post #42 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by genevieveyum

And- you can't use white baking chips or white baking bars or wilton candy melts to make ganache- right?
-sorry if this sounds like I'm repeating myself, I just want to be sure- white chocoalte is sooo expensive!



I use white "chocolate" baking chips for ganache with no problems.
post #43 of 54
post #44 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClareBear66

Sorry, I know I must sound like a broken record, but a few more tips needed about ganache

When you use ganache as a filling - does it harden up or stay smooth

when you cover a cake in spreadable ganache (that has set up from the runny ganache) does it harden into a shell like form where it is too hard to cut when the it comes to eating the cake

Lastly, can you use choc ganache to stack a cake - ie when you have got the edges smooth with ganache & covered each tier in fondant - is it ok to dowel the tiers for stacking or will the ganache crack & cause the fondant to split

thanks in advance
Clare



Ganache doesn't harden into a 'shell' like chocolate that cracks. It's more like it dries out on the top to form a surface that doesn't mark when you touch it, but is still soft enough to cut through.

Dowelling is fine.

Ganache in the centre of the cake goes firm, not 'hard'.
post #45 of 54
I crumb-coat mine, put in the freezer, pull out after a few minutes and put a nice smooth finish coat and stick it back in the freezer for a few minutes, pull it out to sweat while i roll out the fondant and drape/cover the cake.

Or, perhaps your fondant is too thin.
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