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Why does my cake still look lumpy underneath the fondant?? - Page 2

post #16 of 54
Just make sure your cake is room temperature when applying the ganache. I learned the hard way after I refrigerated my crumb coat. As I was applying my final coat, the ganache began to get all firm on me while I was trying to smooth it. Oops.... =)

also, the thickness of the fondant makes a difference on what bumps it will pick up. When I first started using fondant, I just used canned frosting from the store. I put it on fairly smooth, not caring too much about crumbs, and when I put the fondznt on (rolled to about 1/8inch) the frosting under smooths out while I smooth the fondant. It works great every time. (just don't use too much or it can slide down and make the fondant lopsided. Maybe about 1/8 inch frosting as well.)

good luck!
post #17 of 54
I am having the same problem. I use ganache. I smooth it the best I can and then let it set in the fridge and then smooth it all over again. I suspect my fondant is too thin. At the moment with the vast humidity and heat, ganache is a bit of an issue so I am going to give buttercream a try! Good luck.
post #18 of 54
If the ganache' is made properly it shouldn't need any refrigeration even in higher humidity. Ganache' is not like regular frosting and needs time to set up before use...unless you are using it as a poured frosting..which you wouldn't be doing under fondant.

Ganache' really should be left to sit overnight with plastic covering the surface and unrefrigerated in an air conditioned room. It will be quite stiff in the morning and perfect for applying with a cake spatula and then smoothed with a bench scraper. Dip the bench scraper in very hot water ( I use a pot on a hot plate) and then wipe dry. Use the hot bench scraper to smooth the ganache'. Let the cake sit for several hours--not in the frig--until the ganache' is set again. It will be very firm on the outside and creamy underneath.

Roll the fondant out (do use Satin Ice or Pettinice--Wilton's is nasty tasting) and cover with plastic wrap. Apply a very thin coat of corn syrup mixed with water to the sides of the cake. Leave the top uncoated. This will allow you to move the fondant around if you don't get it centered the first time. Then apply the fondant and smooth.

This is a process I know but it's the best way to get really smooth lines and sharp edges. Remember also that when using white chocolate, the ratios of cream to chocolate are totally different than when using semi-sweet.
The Ladyfish... Obi Wan Kenobi of cakes....
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The Ladyfish... Obi Wan Kenobi of cakes....
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post #19 of 54
thank you for posting this.. I have the same problem and I will try all the suggestions above!
I am not a pro cake maker! I simply love baking and would love to learn more about this art!
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I am not a pro cake maker! I simply love baking and would love to learn more about this art!
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post #20 of 54
Have you ever tried Toba Garret's Spackle, cake crumbs mixed with buttercream(butter /shortening) cover cake let harden,then frost with a thin layer of butter cream, then apply fondant. It works like a dream it will cover any imperfections.
post #21 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladyfish74

If the ganache' is made properly it shouldn't need any refrigeration even in higher humidity. Ganache' is not like regular frosting and needs time to set up before use...unless you are using it as a poured frosting..which you wouldn't be doing under fondant.

Ganache' really should be left to sit overnight with plastic covering the surface and unrefrigerated in an air conditioned room. It will be quite stiff in the morning and perfect for applying with a cake spatula and then smoothed with a bench scraper. Dip the bench scraper in very hot water ( I use a pot on a hot plate) and then wipe dry. Use the hot bench scraper to smooth the ganache'. Let the cake sit for several hours--not in the frig--until the ganache' is set again. It will be very firm on the outside and creamy underneath.

Roll the fondant out (do use or Pettinice--Wilton's is nasty tasting) and cover with plastic wrap. Apply a very thin coat of corn syrup mixed with water to the sides of the cake. Leave the top uncoated. This will allow you to move the fondant around if you don't get it centered the first time. Then apply the fondant and smooth.

This is a process I know but it's the best way to get really smooth lines and sharp edges. Remember also that when using white chocolate, the ratios of cream to chocolate are totally different than when using semi-sweet.





Yes! It will harden if left out...I didn't know that. he he... silly me. =) Learning curves. =) Now I know for next time. ganache=no refrigerator! =)
post #22 of 54
I use the cake spackle method, too.....works perfectly! icon_smile.gif
post #23 of 54
Quote:
Quote:

Have you ever tried Toba Garret's Spackle, cake crumbs mixed with buttercream(butter /shortening) cover cake let harden,then frost with a thin layer of butter cream, then apply fondant. It works like a dream it will cover any imperfections.



Yes, I love the stuff...Toba adds jam to hers and so do I. If I can, I get fig, it works splendidly because it doesn't add a fruity taste. I have never covered a whole cake in it. I just use it to fix holes, dents, and to glue broken pieces back on the cake.

Quote:
Quote:

Yes! It will harden if left out...I didn't know that. he he... silly me. =) Learning curves. =) Now I know for next time. ganache=no refrigerator! =)



Well we are all here to learn! That's what so great about this site.
The Ladyfish... Obi Wan Kenobi of cakes....
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The Ladyfish... Obi Wan Kenobi of cakes....
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post #24 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by gbbaker

Have you ever tried Toba Garret's Spackle, cake crumbs mixed with buttercream(butter /shortening) cover cake let harden,then frost with a thin layer of butter cream, then apply fondant. It works like a dream it will cover any imperfections.



I've never tried this method...Just to make sure.. Mix the cake crumbs with buttercream? and use that to cover or crumb coat the cake?

Sorry But I'm new with cake decorating and I'm still tring to learn ways to smooth my fondant surface and sharpen my edges..

thank you all!
I am not a pro cake maker! I simply love baking and would love to learn more about this art!
Reply
I am not a pro cake maker! I simply love baking and would love to learn more about this art!
Reply
post #25 of 54
Thread Starter 
Thank you so much everyone for all your suggestions, you all are awesome! I can't wait to try these techniques.
post #26 of 54
Toba Garrett's cake spackle is as follows:

3 to 4 cups of cake crumbs
1/2 to 3/4 cup buttercream frosting
1/4 preserves, thick jam, or curd

Mix everything together by hand to form a thick paste. If it's too thick, add a little more buttercream until it's the right consistency.

If I am using this on a cake with a fruit or fruit-flavored filling, I try and use the same flavor jam or curd. If I can't match the flavor, I use fig preserves if I can get them. The taste is neutral and the jam is very sticky and works well in this recipe. DON'T TRY THIS USING JELLY.
The Ladyfish... Obi Wan Kenobi of cakes....
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The Ladyfish... Obi Wan Kenobi of cakes....
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post #27 of 54
After you smooth your buttercream and then apply your fondant, be careful not to overwork and/or over-smooth your cake. The fondant is pliable and the buttercream will also move around under the fondant as you work it if you apply much pressure. When I first started decorating cakes, I used to smooth and then smooth the fondant some more. Now I refrigerate the buttercream covered cake to firm it up while I'm rolling out the fondant. Then I plop on the rolled fondant, smooth the top first to make sure I don't trap a big air bubble up there. Then I work the fondant onto the cake with cotton gloved hands (lightly) and then smoooth the sides and square up the edges. Then STOP. I prefer homemade MFF because it firms up after it sets awhile. I had more trouble with MMF staying soft and deforming after it was on the cake.
We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give. Winston Churchill
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We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give. Winston Churchill
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post #28 of 54
Here's a good blog with detailed explanations about how to cover a cake with ganache, round, square, the upside-down method, buttercream under fondant, etc.

http://sugarsweetcakesandtreats.blogspot.com/2010/05/covering-cake-in-ganache.html

http://sugarsweetcakesandtreats.blogspot.com/

http://sugarsweetcakesandtreats.blogspot.com/2010/09/recipe-marshmallow-fondant-mmf.html
post #29 of 54
On that last post, it was late and I was comatose after spending the weekend (with little sleep) on a cake....that was supposed to be 1/4 Cup of preserves etc....not 1/4 preserves! lol
The Ladyfish... Obi Wan Kenobi of cakes....
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The Ladyfish... Obi Wan Kenobi of cakes....
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post #30 of 54
if you are using white chocolate for the ganache under fondant...what is the difference ratio to make it?
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