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Measuring flour correctly - Page 2

post #16 of 28
Thread Starter 
As simplysouthern mentioned, a conversion chart for weights would be handy. I did find this http://www.traditionaloven.com/tutorials/conversion.html
You can go through the 3 step process to get your result.

According to this, 1 cup of all purpose flour or confectioners sugar weigh 4.41 ounces.

But even w/o weighing, just knowing the spoon method of filling a measuring cup is a good thing to know.
KitchenAid Professional 600 6 qt. in January 2011
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KitchenAid Professional 600 6 qt. in January 2011
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post #17 of 28
what about cake flour? according to the website posted above, 1 cup = 100 grams, how many grams is 1 cup sifted cake flour then? I just had a baking problem, so I don't dare to use my own cup measures icon_redface.gif
post #18 of 28
That's the measure I take for cake flour, 100 grams per cup. I just made a cake using that. It came out perfect.

I use 125 grams for regular flour.
post #19 of 28
Forgot to add that some cake flour comes pre-sifted, so don't worry; as long as you keep the 100 grams weight per cup of it, you'll be fine.

When I used to measure with a cup and weigh regular flour afterwards, I know I went all the way to 140 grams per cup of regular flour. So sifted or not, I know I'm doing better by weighing it at 125 grams. Cakes are good now.
post #20 of 28
I guess I'll invest in a scale.
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Cake makes everything better!!!!
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post #21 of 28
A scale speeds up everything, and one that has the option of setting it back to zero after you have put a bowl on it, and weighing only the ingredient (forgot what that's called) is the best.

I don't worry about "sifted/not sifted" because as soon as I get the flour from the supermarket, I sift into the big container that's going to hold it. I don't like bugs, or strange objects in my flours, and sometimes people have found stuff. So I sift flour and also sugar from the very beginning.
post #22 of 28
what about caster/granulated sugar? is it really 225 grams/cup? icon_eek.gif

I was using other website measurements and it states 1 cup sugar = 198 grams! that's too much difference for me, and like I stated before, I just had a baking problem, the old measurement I used was 106 grams for cake flour and 198 grams for sugar, so I wonder whether this differences are the culprit (looking for other reason than my own faulty mixing method) icon_redface.gif

by the way, that zero-ing feature in digital scale is called TARE, it's really useful thumbs_up.gif
post #23 of 28
Thread Starter 
I just got the Kintrex SCL0640 scale. It tares, goes up to 11 pounds, stores easily - PLUS it uses ordinary household type batteries.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003LZIGLQ/ref=oss_product
KitchenAid Professional 600 6 qt. in January 2011
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KitchenAid Professional 600 6 qt. in January 2011
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post #24 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by yupi

what about caster/granulated sugar? is it really 225 grams/cup? icon_eek.gif

I was using other website measurements and it states 1 cup sugar = 198 grams! that's too much difference for me, and like I stated before, I just had a baking problem, the old measurement I used was 106 grams for cake flour and 198 grams for sugar, so I wonder whether this differences are the culprit (looking for other reason than my own faulty mixing method) icon_redface.gif

by the way, that zero-ing feature in digital scale is called TARE, it's really useful thumbs_up.gif



For sugar, I looked all over, read everywhere, and found out that unfortunately, the weight for a cup of sugar goes between 7 ounces to 8 ounces per cup. 7 ounces equals about 200 grams (which makes your measurement of 198 kind of correct), 8 ounces is about 225 grams, which makes the other measurement correct.

The problem with sugar is that some granulated sugars are finer than others and so if you put finer sugar in a cup and weigh that, you're going to get a higher weight because more of it will fit in the cup.

I usually go with 225 grams and take it from there. Maybe do your own experiment and see how much a cup of your sugar weighs on your scale? It should definitely be in between the two measurements.
post #25 of 28
[quote="GeorgiaC"]As simplysouthern mentioned, a conversion chart for weights would be handy. I did find this http://www.traditionaloven.com/tutorials/conversion.html
You can go through the 3 step process to get your result.

According to this, 1 cup of all purpose flour or confectioners sugar weigh 4.41 ounces.

Thank you so much for posting this, GeorgiaC! It is great! I also have the scale you bought & it is such a time saver. I totally agree...weigh everything!!! icon_biggrin.gif
~~~Kathie~~~

"IN YOUTH WE LEARN...WITH AGE WE UNDERSTAND!"
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~~~Kathie~~~

"IN YOUTH WE LEARN...WITH AGE WE UNDERSTAND!"
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post #26 of 28
imaginethatnj
im confused. fine sugar or regular, it will weigh the same. im not sure how you will get more in one cup of one vs the other. if i am wrong, please someone correct me.
in the Cake Bible, there is a reference for what everything should weigh. it comes in very handy for those who like to weigh ingredients out.
post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade8

imaginethatnj
im confused. fine sugar or regular, it will weigh the same. im not sure how you will get more in one cup of one vs the other. if i am wrong, please someone correct me.
in the Cake Bible, there is a reference for what everything should weigh. it comes in very handy for those who like to weigh ingredients out.



My sugar is very fine. I use superfine sugar (still granulated, but very fine). There will be a different in weight. I don't kill myself with thinking about it. I've picked a weight and I've gone with it; made it my standard. I'm safe as long as it is between the 200 grams to 225 grams. I've chosen 225grams.

This might be a better explanation of the differences.

http://www.ochef.com/24.htm
post #28 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade8

imaginethatnj
im confused. fine sugar or regular, it will weigh the same. im not sure how you will get more in one cup of one vs the other. if i am wrong, please someone correct me.
...



Fine sugar does not weigh the same as the same volume of regular sugar. The finer the grains are, the closer they can fit against each other, thereby packing more into the same space. The larger the crystals, the more air space is in between each crystal.

This is the reason that you can't substitute large crystal kosher salt for regular salt in recipes that call for a specific amount of regular salt. 1 teaspoon of kosher salt holds much less actual salt than a teaspoon of regular salt, because a lot of space is taken up with the air/space between the crystals.

I don't know if I'm explaining that clearly.
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Housework makes you ugly.

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