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Reverse Creaming -- do any of you do it? - Page 4

post #46 of 88
now that one i dont know.... mayo is all fat, eggs and oil, so it makes it moist.... i never use sour cream so dont know... sorry icon_sad.gif
post #47 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeandDazzle

My recipe

1 cup milk
6 egg whites
1/2 TBLS Vanilla
1/2 TBLS Almond
1/3 cup mayo
Mix above all in 1 bowl, should sit to get alittle warmer, but doesnt have to

2 1/4 flour
1 3/4 sugar
3 TBLS + 1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp salt
Mix together (i do it in my kitchenaid with the wisk attachment)
add 1 stick softened unsalted butter (i do room temp) whisk and scrap til it looks like sand
Pour in wet.

This is seriously the best recipe I have ever tried. and i did the white scratch off and a hanful of other recipes too. And i use and abuse it too! it becomes lemon poppyseed, strawberry, cherry, whatever i need to make just like they use the WASC.
Let me know if you have anymore questions!!



I love white cake! I just made WASC and I really like it. I'll try your recipe next!

icon_eek.gif I just noticed it calls for 3 TBLS of baking powder icon_eek.gif
post #48 of 88
Woah, wait... that seems like too much baking powder... is it right?
post #49 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

Woah, wait... that seems like too much baking powder... is it right?



Ditto! With that many egg whites too, shouldn't the baking powder be around 4-5 tsp max?

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post #50 of 88
Ugh sorry... egg ehites are correct baking powder is 1 Tbls + 1 tsp
post #51 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeandDazzle

Ugh sorry... egg ehites are correct baking powder is 1 Tbls + 1 tsp

With the amount of flour in the recipe, it still seems like a little too much baking powder. According to Shirley Corriher and RLB, the correct amount would be 2.25 tsp of baking powder. But that is not always the case with cakes. Shirley says a common mistake is that cakes are overleavened.

I personally have found that overleavening works in chocolate cakes, but not so much in white cakes.

Do you know why there is so much BP in the recipe? And how does it affect the crumb. Too much BP and large air bubbles are produced that rise to the top and pop or you get large holes in your cake. I can never leave well enough alone, so I would be tempted to lower that baking powder amount even more.
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post #52 of 88
No i think one of the keys to this cake is the amount of BP! I NEVER have large holes in the cake or bubbles. Ive seen cakes with the brown over cooked bubbles on top, this does not happen. It makes it rise just perfect and the crumb is fantastic to me. I wouldnt cut the BP at allI just think the cake wouldnt be the same.... but i dont know why it has so much all i know is that it is what works
post #53 of 88
I have some thoughts on why, but I'll just take your word for it and try it as is. I think I'll leave the whole science thing about it out for now. Besides its all just conjecture on my part, so why introduce an idea with no proof. icon_wink.gif
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post #54 of 88
Yeah Im not really good with the whole science part of baking at all... But I do know I had a blind tasting party with this as well as several other white cakes and this one hands down! So i go with what works and tastes amazing... hopefully it works well for you and whomever else trys!
post #55 of 88
Yes! We learned the "Reverse Creaming" method in baking school (via Rose's Cake Bible) and I swear by it too. It's faster, more efficient and I find that it creates a smooth emulsion from start to finish when sometimes the creaming method causes curdling of the butter mixture when lots of eggs are added. The result is always an even, uniform and tender crumb. Just make sure to scrape OFTEN!

By the way, Rose Levy Berenbaum has a great blog where she answers questions about her methods. She explains things so well!

Tammy
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post #56 of 88
I usually use applesauce instead of oil or butter. Would the reverse method still work in my case?
post #57 of 88
Not sure KateLS. You could search Rose's blog but I would think maybe not. Seems like the moisture from the applesauce would react with the gluten rather than coating and separating the strands like the butter does. Moisture and friction causes gluten strands to coagulate so brief mixing is your best best bet if you try it.
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post #58 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by LindaF144a

Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeandDazzle

Ugh sorry... egg ehites are correct baking powder is 1 Tbls + 1 tsp

With the amount of flour in the recipe, it still seems like a little too much baking powder. According to Shirley Corriher and RLB, the correct amount would be 2.25 tsp of baking powder. But that is not always the case with cakes. Shirley says a common mistake is that cakes are overleavened.

I personally have found that overleavening works in chocolate cakes, but not so much in white cakes.

Do you know why there is so much BP in the recipe? And how does it affect the crumb. Too much BP and large air bubbles are produced that rise to the top and pop or you get large holes in your cake. I can never leave well enough alone, so I would be tempted to lower that baking powder amount even more.



I agree with CakeandDazzle - I kind of estimated 4 -5 max as usually it takes 2 tsp of BP to change one cup of plain AP flour to self-raising flour. ITBS + 12 tsp = 4 tsp in US measures.

Life's too short to make cake pops.
___________________________________
www.sweetperfection.com.au

www.sweetperfectioncakes.blogspot.com.au/
www.facebook.com/sweetperfectioncakes (come visit sometime!)

Reply

Life's too short to make cake pops.
___________________________________
www.sweetperfection.com.au

www.sweetperfectioncakes.blogspot.com.au/
www.facebook.com/sweetperfectioncakes (come visit sometime!)

Reply
post #59 of 88
Can't wait to try this.....thanks for sharing!
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Where the heart is willing, it will find a thousand ways. Where it is unwilling, it will find a thousand excuses.
-----------------------------------------------------
"I did then what I knew then, when I knew better, I did better." Maya Angelou
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post #60 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evoir

Quote:
Originally Posted by LindaF144a

Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeandDazzle

Ugh sorry... egg ehites are correct baking powder is 1 Tbls + 1 tsp

With the amount of flour in the recipe, it still seems like a little too much baking powder. According to Shirley Corriher and RLB, the correct amount would be 2.25 tsp of baking powder. But that is not always the case with cakes. Shirley says a common mistake is that cakes are overleavened.

I personally have found that overleavening works in chocolate cakes, but not so much in white cakes.

Do you know why there is so much BP in the recipe? And how does it affect the crumb. Too much BP and large air bubbles are produced that rise to the top and pop or you get large holes in your cake. I can never leave well enough alone, so I would be tempted to lower that baking powder amount even more.





That should have said 1 TBSP + 1 tsp...silly fingers are tired from kneading fondant!!

I agree with CakeandDazzle - I kind of estimated 4 -5 max as usually it takes 2 tsp of BP to change one cup of plain AP flour to self-raising flour. ITBS + 12 tsp = 4 tsp in US measures.

Life's too short to make cake pops.
___________________________________
www.sweetperfection.com.au

www.sweetperfectioncakes.blogspot.com.au/
www.facebook.com/sweetperfectioncakes (come visit sometime!)

Reply

Life's too short to make cake pops.
___________________________________
www.sweetperfection.com.au

www.sweetperfectioncakes.blogspot.com.au/
www.facebook.com/sweetperfectioncakes (come visit sometime!)

Reply
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