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Reverse Creaming -- do any of you do it? - Page 2

post #16 of 88
Yes, reverse creaming has been around for years...so many were taught the basic creaming method, but there are different ways to make a cake scientifically...baking is a science.
post #17 of 88
wow, I learn so much from you guys. I do remeber seeing this in the cake bible but I don't recall a name for it....senior moment I guess
post #18 of 88
This is the method that we used in the bakery. It makes a beautifully fine textured, moist cake. I've never had white cake any better than the formula that we produced.
post #19 of 88
Can this method be used on any recipe, or is it best left to butter cakes?
post #20 of 88
so it should only be used with scratch recipe, and not mixes right?
post #21 of 88
I do this for a number of my recipes. No, not all cake mixes casn be mixed this way. Rose LB certainly did NOT invent it, but she is a use of the technique.

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Life's too short to make cake pops.
___________________________________
www.sweetperfection.com.au

www.sweetperfectioncakes.blogspot.com.au/
www.facebook.com/sweetperfectioncakes (come visit sometime!)

Reply
post #22 of 88
how do you know if you can use it or not?
post #23 of 88
Reverse creaming is for butter cakes from scratch.
post #24 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eva2

how do you know if you can use it or not?



Just try a batch and see how it goes. I've successfully converted several recipes to this way of mixing.
post #25 of 88
I learned it from Rose too. I think it is mentioned in Rose's Heavenly Cakes too. I have used it on seveal recipes and it works.
post #26 of 88
The two-step method sounds very much like reverse creaming but it uses hi-ratio shortening, not butter to coat the flour particles:

http://www.ochef.com/625.htm

HTH
post #27 of 88
My perfect white cake that I use for EVERYTHING is done with this method. People cannot believe how moist it is!
post #28 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeandDazzle

My perfect white cake that I use for EVERYTHING is done with this method. People cannot believe how moist it is!



Would you be willing to share how you use this method?

I have done this twice now. The first time I used RBs book and kne of her recipes. While the crumb was tender, it just was not sweet enough. I felt like is was eating slightly sweetened bread.

The second time I used the method as described in the issues of Cook's Country talked about here. In that magazine, you add the butter a bit at a time til you are supposed to get pea sizes pieces where all the dry ingredients and butter meld together. I never got pea sized pieces, but the flour clumped together when pressed between my fingers. They do not add a little bit of liquid like RL does as well as some of the other links posted here suggest. As a result I got one tough, rubbery cake that was full of tunneling. It was a classic example of over mixing. I know I was mixing too long to try to get those pea sized pieces.

I would like to try again. I am not completely satisfied with my vanilla cake and I think this would help.
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post #29 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by LindaF144a

Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeandDazzle

My perfect white cake that I use for EVERYTHING is done with this method. People cannot believe how moist it is!



Would you be willing to share how you use this method?

I have done this twice now. The first time I used RBs book and kne of her recipes. While the crumb was tender, it just was not sweet enough. I felt like is was eating slightly sweetened bread.

The second time I used the method as described in the issues of Cook's Country talked about here. In that magazine, you add the butter a bit at a time til you are supposed to get pea sizes pieces where all the dry ingredients and butter meld together. I never got pea sized pieces, but the flour clumped together when pressed between my fingers. They do not add a little bit of liquid like RL does as well as some of the other links posted here suggest. As a result I got one tough, rubbery cake that was full of tunneling. It was a classic example of over mixing. I know I was mixing too long to try to get those pea sized pieces.

I would like to try again. I am not completely satisfied with my vanilla cake and I think this would help.



Temp of your butter is really important. If your butter is room temp it's too warm. It has to be cold, or only slightly out of the fridge. I have made recipes that call for the pea sized pieces, this is impossible with warm butter and the cake fails.

Sweetness is all in your taste buds, so I can't help you there, but I love Rose's white velvet cake, I think it tastes great (where I think a lot of scratch white recipes taste eggy). Cook's Illustrated also has a great one and Dorie Greenspan's perfect party cake is pretty tasty. Google for recipes.
post #30 of 88
My recipe

1 cup milk
6 egg whites
1/2 TBLS Vanilla
1/2 TBLS Almond
1/3 cup mayo
Mix above all in 1 bowl, should sit to get alittle warmer, but doesnt have to

2 1/4 flour
1 3/4 sugar
3 TBLS + 1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp salt
Mix together (i do it in my kitchenaid with the wisk attachment)
add 1 stick softened unsalted butter (i do room temp) whisk and scrap til it looks like sand
Pour in wet.

This is seriously the best recipe I have ever tried. and i did the white scratch off and a hanful of other recipes too. And i use and abuse it too! it becomes lemon poppyseed, strawberry, cherry, whatever i need to make just like they use the WASC.
Let me know if you have anymore questions!!
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