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Bedazzle - Page 6

post #76 of 80
I remember when disco dust first became the rage a few years back.
I searched online and one of the places that I found it was at Edable Art.
At that time, there seemed to be no guidelines and I couldn't find it here in the US, so I actually e-mailed Edable Art about getting some.
I THOUGHT IT WAS, INDEED, EDIBLE!!!!! NOT!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I've always felt that I wasn't the only one initially caught in the confusion.

We're all exposed to non-toxics on a daily basis.
Yes, we passively consume some of them, but we're not DELIBERATELY eating them--unless we have a medical/psychological problem called a pica!
How can anyone deliberately serve what are, honestly, copious amounts of them to a person who will have NO IDEA that what they're consuming is plastic glitter???????

It's beyond me.
Rae
[/u]
I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
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I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
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post #77 of 80
I see FDA Approved a lot in this thread.... know that there are different levels of FDA approval for pigments and ingredients. Craft (many), Cosmetic (several), Food (some) - ALL many be non-toxic - but as has been discussed all are NOT food grade.

That's my big frustration with the disco glitters. Yes, they are the only way I know to get that effect - but the application and use must be very judicious.

I've eaten and held the bon bons in question.... and I work in the cosmetic industry as well... I've got literally dozens of jars cosmetic glitter and disco sparkle in my art studio. And all I can say is that the bon bon glitter behaves in EXACTLY the same way as the cosmetic and disco glitters.

Sometimes if it walks like a duck, quacks like a duck........

Even though a product may be "inert" how do we know it stays that way going through the digestive track.... I'm not a chemist or a biologist, but what do my stomach acids do to plastic glitter?

Craftsy Instructor: Master Series: The Art of Airbrushing. 

http://www.craftsy.com/class/the-art-of-airbrushing/418

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Craftsy Instructor: Master Series: The Art of Airbrushing. 

http://www.craftsy.com/class/the-art-of-airbrushing/418

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post #78 of 80
Okay, I am reviving this thread. What they use is, is mica. It is edible. It's what they put in lipstick. It can also be FDA approved for food items. I saw it used on cakes and it has complete metalic, straight up glitter look. It's really pretty and the FDA approved stuff cost a grip of money. Sorry, I can not remember what the product is called.
post #79 of 80
I'm still highly skeptical.

While I agree that Mica is a very common ingredient in food-safe pearls (as well as non-toxic decoration colors and cosmetics).... I have not seen it have anywhere near the same reflective properties as polyester glitter.

From a marketing standpoint, the person who developed a high-refraction 100% FDA food-grade glitter that approaches the performance of polyester glitter would be a rich man.

Craftsy Instructor: Master Series: The Art of Airbrushing. 

http://www.craftsy.com/class/the-art-of-airbrushing/418

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Craftsy Instructor: Master Series: The Art of Airbrushing. 

http://www.craftsy.com/class/the-art-of-airbrushing/418

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post #80 of 80
Okay, I saw this with my actual eyes. It is a highly reflective "glitter". I can see how the Bedazzle chocolates got their shine. Now I asked if it was FDA approved and they said yes. Are they telling the truth, I don't know, but she is very well know sugar artist and would lose a lot of face if she lied. And like I said, it's not cheap. It was $55 for I think and ounce or two.
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