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I started it, let's talk about it... - Page 3

post #31 of 183
i live in an area where it is not possible to run a cake business out of home. plain and simple not allowed.

Ill plainly state i make cakes fron friends and family, and have done for friends of friends, for the price of ingredients.

I simply cannot afford to make cakes for free. i usuallly have $100 to do groceries for myself and my son per forntight. so for those of you who would say "its not that much money", i think it would be wise to keep in mind that its not the much money for YOU but is the difference between food on the table and going hungry for others.

I have weighed up the pros and cons of doing what im doing. i dont do cakes for strangers, i do what i do to get practise, and in the hope that one day i will be able to move somewhere where i CAN have a home bakery and then when i go to advertise, i will have a variety of things to show for it.
Dream.Believe.Achieve.Succeed.

~!never trust a skinny cook!~
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Dream.Believe.Achieve.Succeed.

~!never trust a skinny cook!~
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post #32 of 183
Why do you have to do illegal cakes to start a cake business? As it was stated before, do something else and save your money.... something that does not require a specialized license. Cakes are not the only way to make money. Clean houses, work a part time job, etc. If you are selling for ingredients, there is no savings for your dream business. At least a designated job would help save for that goal. If you have children, work out of a closed restaurant in the middle of the night.

And watch the advice for running your expenses for your illegal business through your legal business. If you get caught, that is IRS FRAUD. As times are tough, watch out for someone turning you in. All it takes is one person losing a sale to you and that person decides "that's enough".
post #33 of 183
I really need to save this so I can read through the whole thing.
post #34 of 183
I see that I was quoted upthread. However, I actually have never said what was attributed to me. What I've said about KY is that "it's tricky." And you absolutely do not have to have commercial equipment. I know restaurants that do not have commercial equipment. It's preferred but not required.
Answers to the most often asked questions re: SPS. SPS instructions are on Page 15 of the Sticky at the top of the Cake Decorating Forum. Supplies can be ordered from Oasis Supply, Global or BakeryCrafts.
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Answers to the most often asked questions re: SPS. SPS instructions are on Page 15 of the Sticky at the top of the Cake Decorating Forum. Supplies can be ordered from Oasis Supply, Global or BakeryCrafts.
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post #35 of 183
Florida here... yes it is illegal. I had to get licensed, take the food safety class and rent a commercial kitchen. I pay monthly even if I dont use it monthly to keep my lease up. Like everything else in the world there is a cost to do business. If you want to run it as a business, there are costs. If it is for a hobby , dont complain about the costs, or dont do it. I was too paranoid about having a lawsuit filed without being legal. People today are sue happy and anything can happen. The risk is on your shoulders.
post #36 of 183
Whoever gave you the advice that a corporation will protect your home and personal assets is WRONG. (Hopefully it wasn't an attorney, if so, they should be disbarred) Speaking as an attorney with over 30 years experience and now a cake designer, don't do it unless you go the legal route. It is easy to pierce the corporate veil and go after your personal assets, especially if it can be shown that you are operating illegally.
post #37 of 183
There are several of us licensed bakers on CC who had to earn the money, build the portfolio, and build a following in order to get that license. We worked without a license for a while.

Mostly for friends and family... and sometimes we had to stretch out to friends of friends and friends of family. It actually helped me when I did get my license because I had already built that reputation.

In my opinion... everyone has to learn. You have to start somewhere. I don't think anyone should "be in business" without a license. But if you are doing a favor for a friend or family and you are receiving some sort of compensation or "thank you" for your time, materials, and effort for helping them out, in my opinion.... that's two people treating each other right.

No doubt this is a heated topic. I don't consider unlicensed occasional bakers who are doing something for a friend or family member a threat to my business. Really... if they went to a friend, they don't likely have the budget to come to me anyway... they just took business from Walmart or the local mass production bakery. But not a specialty cake artist with a minimum order that far exceeds the cost spent on materials.

Also... the bulk of the people that ordered from me during that time were people who had never even CONSIDERED a specialty cake until they saw me (someone they know) producing them. AND I can honestly say that all but 1 person that ordered from me during that phase of my life, no longer orders from me unless I'm doing them a favor because they can't afford me. I can pretty easily surmise that I wasn't stealing business from the local cake artists...
-Stacey
Truly Custom Cakery, LLC

Website: http://www.trulycustomcakery.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/TrulyCustom
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-Stacey
Truly Custom Cakery, LLC

Website: http://www.trulycustomcakery.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/TrulyCustom
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post #38 of 183
So it is ok to steal business from a bakery, just not the cake artist? The bakery has just as much of a right to fair trade. But... I do agree that friends, neighbors, family, co-workers... are not customers.
post #39 of 183
My point is that people are going on and on about how people can offer the cake "FOR LESS" and these custom shops can't compete with those prices and it's causing them to "lose" business.

If the price of the bakery/walmart/friend is the same... then that argument is void. And if that's their budget, they never would have called a custom shop anyway.

Bakeries, Walmart, Sam's Club all know about each other and aren't all up in arms because the other guy stole their customer. Heaven forbid one of them have a sale!!!!!
-Stacey
Truly Custom Cakery, LLC

Website: http://www.trulycustomcakery.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/TrulyCustom
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-Stacey
Truly Custom Cakery, LLC

Website: http://www.trulycustomcakery.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/TrulyCustom
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post #40 of 183
Anna, I simply never said that and this is an irritation. Those three states allow baking from home. I was misquoted and this home kitchen versus commercial kitchen is a different discussion. Legally baking from home is allowed in Kentucky and you have to abide by other rules as well. Got it. Don't quote me but I think you have to follow certain continuing rules in the other states too.

Enjoy your cakery.





edited once for a typo & clarity
my cookies are prettier than your cookies because this is the second time i substituted my opalescent sanding sugar when i ran out of sugar to make the batch ha!

 

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my cookies are prettier than your cookies because this is the second time i substituted my opalescent sanding sugar when i ran out of sugar to make the batch ha!

 

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post #41 of 183
The point is the illegal baker takes from someone. It could be any legal baker at all price levels...Walmart, local bakery, me, you... you were basically sayng that as long as the baker is not at your price point, it's ok. My point is that the bakeries in town have just as much right to fair trade as the artist. And even the chains have heavily paid to do business in the community. Obviously due to their volume, they don't care. But a struggling bakery cares.
post #42 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

I see that I was quoted upthread. However, I actually have never said what was attributed to me. What I've said about KY is that "it's tricky." And you absolutely do not have to have commercial equipment. I know restaurants that do not have commercial equipment. It's preferred but not required.



Leah, you have to have a separate kitchen though, right? Like a basement kitchen? You can't do it from your "home kitchen". Right now I'm renting commercial space, but if I could do it from my home kitchen...I'd jump through whatever hoops necessary!
post #43 of 183
No doubt. The business is being taken from someone and no one should operate on a permanent or long term basis without the proper legal steps being taken.

I guess this argument wears on me. It just feel's very dramatic, presumptuous, and self righteous for anyone to say that someone who is trying desperately hard to break into the business and is taking a small amount of compensation for their hard work is "stealing" business from them. It's assumed that the one being "stolen" from had a shot at that person's business to begin with and likely... they never did.

Of course... if they took no compensation at all and just did it as a gift. There would be an even bigger issue. How does anyone compete with FREE?!
-Stacey
Truly Custom Cakery, LLC

Website: http://www.trulycustomcakery.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/TrulyCustom
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-Stacey
Truly Custom Cakery, LLC

Website: http://www.trulycustomcakery.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/TrulyCustom
Reply
post #44 of 183
Ok, so I have read this subject in several threads and would like to put some thoughts out there...
If you want to do cakes as a business, being legal is the way to go. First, it is the law. Second, it protects YOU. Third, it will get in venues that otherwise you could not get in.
When I started a year ago, I did free cakes for family and friends. Yes, it cost money, lots of it, pans, supplies, etc. I considered the money I spend education money, like, if I was going to school and had to pay tuition. Same thing, did not matter that I was teatching myself.
Now I m legal, I work out of a friends commercial kitchen where I pay a nominal amount (this will end by next year, she is moving out of state so I will have some decisions to make then). I charge just as much as any other custom bakery in my area. I could charge a lot less but I want to build a clientele that can afford me at a ghler price because I know my expenses will be higher then.
With that said, I have a question...most of the complains from legit business is that the illegal home bakers undercut them in price and therefore steals their sale. I would not like that either. But, would you fell just as upset if a legit business, with less overhead, chose to charge a lot less and was busier for that?
Some bakers out ther have fancy store fronts that cost a lot in overhead ( I would love to have one of those) and others work out of a small commercial kithchen, off the beaten path, with much lower overhead. If they are charging a lot less for their cakes and getting lots of sale because of that, are they stealing business from others or just being wiser in their decision of staying less fancy to cut costs.
Again, my question is not about illegal bakers, but legal ones undercutting your prices and stealing your business. thumbs_up.gif

"You might forget the party, but you will not forget my cakes!"
www.divineIndulgencesDesignerCakes.com
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"You might forget the party, but you will not forget my cakes!"
www.divineIndulgencesDesignerCakes.com
www.Facebook.com/divineIndulgencesDesignerCakes

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post #45 of 183
Some businesses require a license and expensive requirements. Give the cakes away and earn money to save for your business some other way. The law is the law. If you don't agree with it, move. I did not get a break by selling cakes. Not everyone starts illegally. I believe in the law. My area is one of the most expensive I have seen on this site for starting a baking related business, but I still complied. Every requirement has a purpose, whether environmental or for public safety.

There are too many people on this site all over the world who have legal bakeries. With the right business plan, it is possible anywhere. If someone cannot figure out how to do it legally, they don't have a business. There are many enterprising bakers on this site with successful businesses who started in unorthodox ways because of cash constraints.
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