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silicone molds and royal icing

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Hi! I tried searching this topic but couldn't find much.
I'd like to make some molded flowers, etc. out of royal icing. I'm not very good at piping them. I usually use chocolate, but I need a way to do them for hot weather... so I thought... royal! I know you can't use the chocolate molds for these, but I saw online that you could use silicone molds for royal icing. I was very surprised! I couldn't find any tips, however.
Has anyone done this? Any tips? How long do they take to dry, on average?

Thanks!
Maria
post #2 of 14
I'd think that would work best for pieces that were one solid shape, with not a lot of petals or little pieces that stick out. Like a rose as opposed to a daisy, know what I mean? Or the molds would have to be pretty shallow...

I can't imagine that royal icing would come out of a mold unless it dried fora good long time, maybe a few days. I'd be too scared to try to remove it from the mold.

Would solid chocolate not work? I can see chocolate clay being too soft, but I'd think that unless it was 100 degrees solid pieces of chcoolate would work fine.
post #3 of 14
I would also think unless the mold was shallow, the royal would not get dry in the middle.

I agree that white chocolate would work fine! And you can store in the fridge until use. Just handle with gloves to avoid fingerprinting and stuff.
post #4 of 14
seems like if one could use a silicone mold for royal, a chocolate mold could be used as well. I would grease the wells lightly and make sure not to reuse the scraped off icing. keep grease off of scraper between each mold sheet...or wait until they're completely dry and carefully clean up with a sharp knife. It's been an eternity since I've done it and like costumeczar stated, it does take days to dry completely to be able to invert it and tap out. Molded sguar works great in them too if you're wanting to get away from chocolate or gumpaste/fondant even...that can be used in chocolate molds (dust the molds with powdered sugar/cornstarch first for the latter)
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post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by all4cake

Molded sguar works great in them too if you're wanting to get away from chocolate or gumpaste/fondant even...that can be used in chocolate molds (dust the molds with powdered sugar/cornstarch first for the latter)



I was thinking of this, too. I'd think tht it would be easier to deal with than royal icing, too. You'd still need to let it dry for a long time, though. Maybe you could get a food dehumidifier and put them in that.
post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 
thanks for the tips! I'm going to try it in a really shallow mold first, I think.
post #7 of 14
actually, with the molded sugar, I pack it in, scrape off the back, place a parchment (can use waxed or freezer paper) covered board on back, invert then lightly tap. They dry before the day is out....bigger molded sugar items like the high heel, baby bottle...are ready to hollow the next day and ready to assemble the following day.
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post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 
all4cake, do you tap the sugar out of the mold right after you mold it? does it need to sit in the mold to "set up" for a while? Thanks!
post #9 of 14
yep...right after molding. If extended areas (like feet, nipples(baby bottle), tips of teapots...) continue coming off while (gently) tapping, your mixture needs a bit more water...add just a smidge at a time though.
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post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by all4cake

actually, with the molded sugar, I pack it in, scrape off the back, place a parchment (can use waxed or freezer paper) covered board on back, invert then lightly tap. They dry before the day is out....bigger molded sugar items like the high heel, baby bottle...are ready to hollow the next day and ready to assemble the following day.



Ah, that's right. I forgot that you can press them out. My mother had a bunch of molds that you were supposed to use to make fancy sugar cubes. They were pretty shallow, though, I can't see some of the more intricate flowers molds coming out clean if the sugar is still damp. It's worth a try, though.
post #11 of 14
oh, and you neither grease nor dust the mold. Just make sure it's clean and dry. If you're doing a lot of them, it may be necessary to rinse and dry thoroughly occasionally between moldings
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post #12 of 14
I've not used the silicone molds...just chocolate molds...pretty intricate details that will come out true to the mold if the sugar is just right...not too wet not too dry...too wet, it remains in the mold, too dry, pieces snap off upon release...it takes only a couple of tries to find the happy medium.

The deep recessed details of some of those would probably benefit from remaining in the mold until hardened completely...you're right, that could take days (I'm sorry if that is what you meant earlier and it went over my head)
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post #13 of 14
I was thinking of a chrysanthemum mold that I have that has a ton of little pointy petals. I do that one with chocolate or isomalt and stick them in the fridge, but I can't imagine that it would work with sugar unless it dried a lot first before you tried to push it out. Some other ones that don't have so many little parts that stick out would come out no problem, though, so it just depends on the mold. you're right, though,the sugar would have to be exactly right and not too wet!
post #14 of 14

Hey I'm trying to make someĀ chocolate cup candy with creamy stuff in the middle do u have an ideal what should i use for the middle can't be peanut butter because my friend is allergic to it so yea. Please helpĀ icon_sad.gif

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